Topics

Maximum allowable operating voltage


John T. Fitzer
 

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?


Dave Benson
 

John-

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?



John T. Fitzer
 

Thanks Dave.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 


John T. Fitzer
 

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 


Dave Benson
 

John-

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

73- Dave, K1SWL



On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 



John T. Fitzer
 

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 


Dave Benson
 

John-

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

73- Dave

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 



John T. Fitzer
 

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 


Dave Benson
 

John-

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

73- Dave, K1SWL

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 



David Wilcox <Djwilcox01@...>
 

What is the Muania sub groups name in the yahoo groups or has it been placed in the .io group?  I picked a kit up for my grandson at FDIM.

Dave K8WPE

On Jun 25, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Dave Benson <davek1swl@...> wrote:

John-

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

73- Dave, K1SWL

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 



WA0ITP
 

Hello David,

Thank you for purchasing the Murania.

The sub group's address is
MuraniaKit@4SQRP.groups.io  Cu there.


72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com
On 6/26/2018 4:06 AM, David Wilcox via Groups.Io wrote:

What is the Muania sub groups name in the yahoo groups or has it been placed in the .io group?  I picked a kit up for my grandson at FDIM.

Dave K8WPE

On Jun 25, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Dave Benson <davek1swl@...> wrote:

John-

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

73- Dave, K1SWL

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 




John T. Fitzer
 

Thanks for the info Dave. Speaking of transistor wars, do you remember Tetrode bipolar transistors? They had 4 leads, an emitter, collector, and 2 base leads. As I recall they were never very popular and didn’t show up much in consumer electronics, but they were kind of popular in military and telephone gear particularly as RF amps in that they had a somewhat higher gain at or near the upper end of their useful frequency range. I just googled to revive my memory and to verify I was remembering correctly and came across a 3N22. Now all I need is an RCA 5 tube 1 volt filament radio to listen to on the back porch. Hi Hi. By the way if you need a couple of 1T4’s I have some N.O.S. They apparently work good as Armstrong detectors with 45 volts on the plate.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 4:27 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

 

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 

 


Dave Benson
 

John-

The '3N22' rings a bell, but I'd never looked at them in detail.  Were they used as mixers or controllable-gain amplifiers?  FWIW I worked on military projects as a young engineer, but not in RF.   In fact, our division didn't have a spectrum analyzer- it meant using 'ham-intuition' to solve puzzling problems.

The 1T4 sounds intriguing- I'd be interested. 

73 -Dave

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 10:43 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info Dave. Speaking of transistor wars, do you remember Tetrode bipolar transistors? They had 4 leads, an emitter, collector, and 2 base leads. As I recall they were never very popular and didn’t show up much in consumer electronics, but they were kind of popular in military and telephone gear particularly as RF amps in that they had a somewhat higher gain at or near the upper end of their useful frequency range. I just googled to revive my memory and to verify I was remembering correctly and came across a 3N22. Now all I need is an RCA 5 tube 1 volt filament radio to listen to on the back porch. Hi Hi. By the way if you need a couple of 1T4’s I have some N.O.S. They apparently work good as Armstrong detectors with 45 volts on the plate.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 4:27 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

 

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 

 



John T. Fitzer
 

Dave I just went through my box of junk tubes and I couldn’t find any 1T4’s left. Sorry but my memory isn’t what it used to be. I did come across some 12AT7’s which I have seen used in regen circuit and some 1B2 VR tubes. I was planning someday to use some of these in a tube based regen but I’ll probably never get to that project as my interests have pretty much narrowed to QRP portable and solid state gear. Additionally my family obligations have greatly increased due having to care for elderly in-laws. If you would like what I have left I would be glad to ship to you for you to play with. Just let me know and confirm your address is Schoolhouse Rd.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 7:37 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

The '3N22' rings a bell, but I'd never looked at them in detail.  Were they used as mixers or controllable-gain amplifiers?  FWIW I worked on military projects as a young engineer, but not in RF.   In fact, our division didn't have a spectrum analyzer- it meant using 'ham-intuition' to solve puzzling problems.

 

The 1T4 sounds intriguing- I'd be interested. 

 

73 -Dave

 

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 10:43 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info Dave. Speaking of transistor wars, do you remember Tetrode bipolar transistors? They had 4 leads, an emitter, collector, and 2 base leads. As I recall they were never very popular and didn’t show up much in consumer electronics, but they were kind of popular in military and telephone gear particularly as RF amps in that they had a somewhat higher gain at or near the upper end of their useful frequency range. I just googled to revive my memory and to verify I was remembering correctly and came across a 3N22. Now all I need is an RCA 5 tube 1 volt filament radio to listen to on the back porch. Hi Hi. By the way if you need a couple of 1T4’s I have some N.O.S. They apparently work good as Armstrong detectors with 45 volts on the plate.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 4:27 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

 

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 

 

 


Dave Benson
 

John-

Please don't trouble yourself  about sending tubes along, but thanks anyway- I was intrigued by the 1T4. I also have a few tubes in one of my junk boxes. I'd be hard-pressed to find them, of course.

73- Dave

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 9:58 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I just went through my box of junk tubes and I couldn’t find any 1T4’s left. Sorry but my memory isn’t what it used to be. I did come across some 12AT7’s which I have seen used in regen circuit and some 1B2 VR tubes. I was planning someday to use some of these in a tube based regen but I’ll probably never get to that project as my interests have pretty much narrowed to QRP portable and solid state gear. Additionally my family obligations have greatly increased due having to care for elderly in-laws. If you would like what I have left I would be glad to ship to you for you to play with. Just let me know and confirm your address is Schoolhouse Rd.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 7:37 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

The '3N22' rings a bell, but I'd never looked at them in detail.  Were they used as mixers or controllable-gain amplifiers?  FWIW I worked on military projects as a young engineer, but not in RF.   In fact, our division didn't have a spectrum analyzer- it meant using 'ham-intuition' to solve puzzling problems.

 

The 1T4 sounds intriguing- I'd be interested. 

 

73 -Dave

 

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 10:43 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info Dave. Speaking of transistor wars, do you remember Tetrode bipolar transistors? They had 4 leads, an emitter, collector, and 2 base leads. As I recall they were never very popular and didn’t show up much in consumer electronics, but they were kind of popular in military and telephone gear particularly as RF amps in that they had a somewhat higher gain at or near the upper end of their useful frequency range. I just googled to revive my memory and to verify I was remembering correctly and came across a 3N22. Now all I need is an RCA 5 tube 1 volt filament radio to listen to on the back porch. Hi Hi. By the way if you need a couple of 1T4’s I have some N.O.S. They apparently work good as Armstrong detectors with 45 volts on the plate.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 4:27 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

 

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 

 

 



John T. Fitzer
 

OK Dave, the 1T4 as I recall is a 1 volt filament pentode that was used in IF amps of battery operated portable radios. It like all 1 volt filament tubes really weren’t capable of the gain achievable with higher voltage heater tubes. They are interesting, but guys like you and myself who worked on tube gear and realize that the solid state gear and devices are so superior in price and performance are probably not lured by the nostalgia of filaments glowing in the dark. All will be well until and if there is an EMP event. But then all bets are off anyway given the frailty of our power grid. By the way any word on possibly providing the Hilltopper for other bands. Even if the modification package would contain a micro programmed for any one band and a kit of hardware parte for the receiver input and xmitter output.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 11:29 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Please don't trouble yourself  about sending tubes along, but thanks anyway- I was intrigued by the 1T4. I also have a few tubes in one of my junk boxes. I'd be hard-pressed to find them, of course.

 

73- Dave

 

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 9:58 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I just went through my box of junk tubes and I couldn’t find any 1T4’s left. Sorry but my memory isn’t what it used to be. I did come across some 12AT7’s which I have seen used in regen circuit and some 1B2 VR tubes. I was planning someday to use some of these in a tube based regen but I’ll probably never get to that project as my interests have pretty much narrowed to QRP portable and solid state gear. Additionally my family obligations have greatly increased due having to care for elderly in-laws. If you would like what I have left I would be glad to ship to you for you to play with. Just let me know and confirm your address is Schoolhouse Rd.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 7:37 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

The '3N22' rings a bell, but I'd never looked at them in detail.  Were they used as mixers or controllable-gain amplifiers?  FWIW I worked on military projects as a young engineer, but not in RF.   In fact, our division didn't have a spectrum analyzer- it meant using 'ham-intuition' to solve puzzling problems.

 

The 1T4 sounds intriguing- I'd be interested. 

 

73 -Dave

 

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 10:43 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info Dave. Speaking of transistor wars, do you remember Tetrode bipolar transistors? They had 4 leads, an emitter, collector, and 2 base leads. As I recall they were never very popular and didn’t show up much in consumer electronics, but they were kind of popular in military and telephone gear particularly as RF amps in that they had a somewhat higher gain at or near the upper end of their useful frequency range. I just googled to revive my memory and to verify I was remembering correctly and came across a 3N22. Now all I need is an RCA 5 tube 1 volt filament radio to listen to on the back porch. Hi Hi. By the way if you need a couple of 1T4’s I have some N.O.S. They apparently work good as Armstrong detectors with 45 volts on the plate.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 4:27 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

 

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dave Benson
 

John-

Here's an oddball vacuum tube:


I've always wanted to build a QRP transmitter with the 958A -  a 1.5V filament device.

73- Dave


On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:02 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

OK Dave, the 1T4 as I recall is a 1 volt filament pentode that was used in IF amps of battery operated portable radios. It like all 1 volt filament tubes really weren’t capable of the gain achievable with higher voltage heater tubes. They are interesting, but guys like you and myself who worked on tube gear and realize that the solid state gear and devices are so superior in price and performance are probably not lured by the nostalgia of filaments glowing in the dark. All will be well until and if there is an EMP event. But then all bets are off anyway given the frailty of our power grid. By the way any word on possibly providing the Hilltopper for other bands. Even if the modification package would contain a micro programmed for any one band and a kit of hardware parte for the receiver input and xmitter output.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 11:29 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Please don't trouble yourself  about sending tubes along, but thanks anyway- I was intrigued by the 1T4. I also have a few tubes in one of my junk boxes. I'd be hard-pressed to find them, of course.

 

73- Dave

 

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 9:58 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I just went through my box of junk tubes and I couldn’t find any 1T4’s left. Sorry but my memory isn’t what it used to be. I did come across some 12AT7’s which I have seen used in regen circuit and some 1B2 VR tubes. I was planning someday to use some of these in a tube based regen but I’ll probably never get to that project as my interests have pretty much narrowed to QRP portable and solid state gear. Additionally my family obligations have greatly increased due having to care for elderly in-laws. If you would like what I have left I would be glad to ship to you for you to play with. Just let me know and confirm your address is Schoolhouse Rd.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 7:37 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

The '3N22' rings a bell, but I'd never looked at them in detail.  Were they used as mixers or controllable-gain amplifiers?  FWIW I worked on military projects as a young engineer, but not in RF.   In fact, our division didn't have a spectrum analyzer- it meant using 'ham-intuition' to solve puzzling problems.

 

The 1T4 sounds intriguing- I'd be interested. 

 

73 -Dave

 

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 10:43 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info Dave. Speaking of transistor wars, do you remember Tetrode bipolar transistors? They had 4 leads, an emitter, collector, and 2 base leads. As I recall they were never very popular and didn’t show up much in consumer electronics, but they were kind of popular in military and telephone gear particularly as RF amps in that they had a somewhat higher gain at or near the upper end of their useful frequency range. I just googled to revive my memory and to verify I was remembering correctly and came across a 3N22. Now all I need is an RCA 5 tube 1 volt filament radio to listen to on the back porch. Hi Hi. By the way if you need a couple of 1T4’s I have some N.O.S. They apparently work good as Armstrong detectors with 45 volts on the plate.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 4:27 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

 

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?

 

 

 

 

 

 



John T. Fitzer
 

I have seen gear that used acorn tubes, mostly WW2 surplus at ham fests over the years but I never worked on any. That tube is a transmitting triode with a plate dissipation of 600 mw. Given the amount of PITA involved with getting a triode to be stable as an RF stage and only getting 0.6 watts or so out. Well thanks but not for me. I did have, a long time ago, a surplus field telephone made by Motorola that I put on 6 meters that used strange  tubes, they were real small and had the pins coming out of the bottom in a straight line, although I can’t remember the tube numbers. Again war surplus that I got cheap and had a nice toy to play with as a kid.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:44 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Here's an oddball vacuum tube:

 

 

I've always wanted to build a QRP transmitter with the 958A -  a 1.5V filament device.

 

73- Dave

 

 

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:02 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

OK Dave, the 1T4 as I recall is a 1 volt filament pentode that was used in IF amps of battery operated portable radios. It like all 1 volt filament tubes really weren’t capable of the gain achievable with higher voltage heater tubes. They are interesting, but guys like you and myself who worked on tube gear and realize that the solid state gear and devices are so superior in price and performance are probably not lured by the nostalgia of filaments glowing in the dark. All will be well until and if there is an EMP event. But then all bets are off anyway given the frailty of our power grid. By the way any word on possibly providing the Hilltopper for other bands. Even if the modification package would contain a micro programmed for any one band and a kit of hardware parte for the receiver input and xmitter output.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 11:29 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Please don't trouble yourself  about sending tubes along, but thanks anyway- I was intrigued by the 1T4. I also have a few tubes in one of my junk boxes. I'd be hard-pressed to find them, of course.

 

73- Dave

 

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 9:58 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I just went through my box of junk tubes and I couldn’t find any 1T4’s left. Sorry but my memory isn’t what it used to be. I did come across some 12AT7’s which I have seen used in regen circuit and some 1B2 VR tubes. I was planning someday to use some of these in a tube based regen but I’ll probably never get to that project as my interests have pretty much narrowed to QRP portable and solid state gear. Additionally my family obligations have greatly increased due having to care for elderly in-laws. If you would like what I have left I would be glad to ship to you for you to play with. Just let me know and confirm your address is Schoolhouse Rd.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 7:37 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

The '3N22' rings a bell, but I'd never looked at them in detail.  Were they used as mixers or controllable-gain amplifiers?  FWIW I worked on military projects as a young engineer, but not in RF.   In fact, our division didn't have a spectrum analyzer- it meant using 'ham-intuition' to solve puzzling problems.

 

The 1T4 sounds intriguing- I'd be interested. 

 

73 -Dave

 

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 10:43 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info Dave. Speaking of transistor wars, do you remember Tetrode bipolar transistors? They had 4 leads, an emitter, collector, and 2 base leads. As I recall they were never very popular and didn’t show up much in consumer electronics, but they were kind of popular in military and telephone gear particularly as RF amps in that they had a somewhat higher gain at or near the upper end of their useful frequency range. I just googled to revive my memory and to verify I was remembering correctly and came across a 3N22. Now all I need is an RCA 5 tube 1 volt filament radio to listen to on the back porch. Hi Hi. By the way if you need a couple of 1T4’s I have some N.O.S. They apparently work good as Armstrong detectors with 45 volts on the plate.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 4:27 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

It's an AM BC receiver. I have no other details except to note that the top cover is a work of art. One of the legends on the cover is "1 transistor".  I don't know if that's serious or a swipe at the 'transistor arms-race'  of the late '50s and early 60s. Anyway- I've always wanted to do some crystal radio work -after an absence of 60 years- and this seems pretty close. I'm pretty sure it's a TRF.

 

We have a 5kW (daytime) AM station a little over a mile away as the crow flies. We'll hear it!  It drops to 27W at sundown, so we'll hear more distant stations at night. 

 

It'll be available very soon. Your best bet would be to request a subscription to the Murania subgroup  :-)

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 11:17 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave I haven’t heard of the Murania kit, what is it? Have fun with the granddaughter, kids are a lot of fun. A few years back I designed a small very inexpensive regen receiver that the club kitted and sold for $10.00 to interested youngsters and then hosted a build session where we supplied the tools for the kids to assemble the kits with help from Elmer’s. The net result was that all the kids left with working receivers that had reasonable performance on the SW bands. Now the kids are really getting into Arduino and writing code and then taking their programs and actually loading into a micro and playing with it. I wish I were better at coding, but I can help the kids with interfacing the Arduino board with the real world. After all an Arduino robot controller isn’t worth anything if you can’t drive the motors. I guess even us obsolete guys have a purpose.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 5:49 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You don't appear to be a mere mortal. :-)  If you have a USB microscope, you have an advantage over my setup.

 

I'd like to have one of those- perhaps I should pull the trigger. We'll have our 7-1/2 year-old granddaughter with us this summer, and she loves using her mom's microscope.  I'll also order one of 4SQRP's 'Murania'  AM BC kits as soon as they're available- she should get a real kick out of that. 

 

73- Dave

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 1:52 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Yes Dave, I have been working with electronic components both commercially and as a hobby for over 56 years now. I have a visor with additional magnifying loops attached which I have used for the past 35 years. I also use a computer USB micro-scope for inspecting surface mounted components, boy that sure helps. Anyway now if I have any doubt I use a meter to check the value of caps prior to installing them, same for resistors. Good digital meters with resistance and capacitance ranges are available for under $50.00 and are worth their weight in gold, even though they don’t weigh much Hi Hi. It is true that it is a bit harder to build or service electronics gear today then when we were younger, the reliability has been exponentially increased by reduced heating through higher efficiency of active components,. and much improved mechanical ruggedness that results from the minimization or elimination of component leads. Additionally because of the reduced weight and lower power requirements we hams can have equipment with features and performance that were not available even on the most expensive gear of 50 years ago and at a cost anyone can afford. Imagine the Heath HR10 receiver available in 1968. It cost about $80.00 then which is equivalent to $360.00 in today’s dollars and its performance in my opinion was way below the weber radios available for less than $300.00 and they have transmit capabilities. I have an ATS 3 built into an Altoids tin and I simply can’t believe the performance of that radio. By the way thank you for your work in designing the hill topper and making it available for us mere mortals.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2018 12:22 PM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

Yes- the club has done a wonderful job with kitting!   

 

Components have indeed gotten smaller- especially capacitors.  I use a 10X eye-loupe (and good lighting) to check their values. They're available from Digikey and doubtlessly from other electronic suppliers for $3-4.  I can also recommend a magnifying visor (Amazon and others) for about $20.  Mine came with an assortment of lenses, and I went immediately to the strongest lens- a focal length of 4 inches.

 

73- Dave, K1SWL

 

 

 

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 10:24 AM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

Dave received the kit this week and opened it to see the contents of the kit. I just want to say I’m impressed with the way everything was packaged with the parts sorted into individually marked bags sorted by recommended construction group sequence. I think this will make construction so much easier, as the size of components has shrunk along with their marking. Great job to whomever assembles the kits. I may not have time to assemble for a while due to family and work obligations, but am looking forward to building and using the kit. I can’t wait for the 40 meter version to become available, and after that maybe a 30, and 80 meter version. If and when they are available I’ll purchase them all. That’s the beauty of QRP and home construction, the rigs are economical enough so that you can afford to have more toys. Great job guys.

 

From: HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:HilltopperKit@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Benson
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:55 AM
To: HilltopperKit@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [HilltopperKit] Maximum allowable operating voltage

 

John-

 

You should be OK in the 14V supply ballpark.  The limiting factor is the 16V electrolytic cap just 'downstream' of the reverse-polarity protection diode.  I often run my Hilltopper on a 4-cell LiFePO4 battery, which charges to 14V.

4SQRP and I are discussing the best way to put a version for 40M on the streets.  Hoping to get it ironed out soon.

 

73- Dave Benson, K1SWL

 

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 1:37 PM, John T. Fitzer <John.fitzer@...> wrote:

I am thinking about purchasing the hill topper kit and am wondering what the maximum allowable operating voltage is. I have a MTR3 and a ATS3 both of which say to limit the operating voltage to 12 volts maximum. For those rigs I use 8 NiMH cells which yields approximately 11.2 volts at full charge. I also have several 10 cell NiMH batteries with 2.1X5.5 mm DC power connectors that I use foe my Sierra. Those batteries output approximately 14.4 volts full charge. My question is would I be safe using the 10 call NiMH batteries with the hill topper as long as I ensure the SWR is reasonable i.e. 1.5 or less? In addition Dave put up a post that he was going to offer a 40 meter conversion kit. Is that still in the works?