Re: DMR at Ozarkcon


John Lonigro
 

I guess I concur with Tom.  However, I believe one reason amateur radio even exists is to have a means of providing communications in an emergency.  I'm not very familiar with FT8, but I've heard that just about all you can exchange is a callsign and maybe a grid square.  I think the ideal digital mode would be one that's almost as robust as FT8 but with the ability to send at least 30-40 characters of data besides callsigns.  I don't know but perhaps that would be JS8CALL, as mentioned by Dennis Shelton.  But if someone is happy making FT8 contacts, at least he's making use of the airwaves and having fun in the process.  In an emergency, he may have to use a different mode but his FT8 experience will certainly help in that regard.

On a separate topic, I have an SW+ 80M CW transceiver I built many years ago.  I don't have room for a good 80M antenna and have never put it on the air.  It's in an original Small Wonder case (about 4"x4"x2") and puts out about 1.5 Watts from 3.556 - 3.587 MHz.  The frequency range can be adjusted.  It comes with full documentation and will be available for sale at Ozarkcon if anyone is interested.  I think with case it cost me about $100.  I'll sell it for $50.

72,
John, AA0VE

On 3/18/19 8:45 AM, Thomas Martin wrote:
My two cents worth
Making contacts is the fun of Ham radio finding a station to work no matter the mode used.
We have seen a reassurance of CW recently when people were saying it was going away.  
Some times getting the Software and computer working for the new modes is a little challenging at least for me but solving those problems is what makes ham radio fun.

Tom
K0amd


On Mar 18, 2019, at 5:24 AM, Dave Benson <davek1swl@...> wrote:

At the risking of hijacking the original thread, I'll add my two-cents worth.

I'm using FT8 because it's a good way to rack up QSOs. My passion these days is for portable operation, where programs like SOTA and POTA need a certain number of contacts for activation credit. At least during weekdays, it can be tough to scrounge up the necessary minimum on CW if you're not 'spotted'.  By contrast, FT8 is always jumping if the band's open.  It's a matter of 'going where the action is'. The contacts themselves aren't terribly exciting.

I'm preparing for warmer weather here (NH) by assembling a portable FT8 station.  A Microsoft 'Surface' and a homebrew FT8 transceiver. The rig runs 8 watts out, and recently picked up a new country - EA9 (Cueta y Mellila)- with it.  And yes- I'll have a small CW rig along on outings- that mode has always been my favorite.

73- Dave, K1SWL

On Sun, Mar 17, 2019 at 5:46 PM David Speltz <dspeltz@...> wrote:
FT8 is rather remarkable and in a few short weeks I had worked the Falklands, WAS, etc etc on a nine foot vertical all from NH.  However, I really do find PSK, which tends to have the same robust characteristics, more interesting since it is keyboard to keyboard talking other that watching the robot do its work.  I am sure I will be back to FT8 now and then, but after maybe 1000 contacts, there is so much more to do and so little time.

David KB1PJ

On Mar 17, 2019, at 4:39 PM, Jim Parks <jim.ny0j@...> wrote:

Here is my experience with FT8. I have been a ham for nearly 50 years and had been inactive for the past 20 years due  to the typical excuses, job, family etc. I retired and moved into a condo in Branson MO and decided to become an active ham again. Unfortunately, due to very restrictive HOA regulations a “normal” antenna was out of the question. I did have, however, a 18’ piece of downspout right outside the room where I could put my radio equipment. I jury rigged an antenna out of it, but to no surprise I heard virtually nothing in the way of SSB signals and a few weak CW signals. One day while tuning around on 40m near 7.074 I heard these strange musical tones. Asking around, I discovered FT8. I downloaded the software and learned to use it. In the past 14 months, using this amazing weak-signal mode, I have worked, and have confirmed 49 states on 5 bands and have confirmed over 35 DXCC entities. I would NEVER have been able to do this using the “conventional” modes. This reenergized me in ham radio and kept one old him active. I think this is just an example of just how broad this hobby is. There is something for everybody from 75m rag chewers to 10GHZ moon bounce communicators. I guess my feeling is that you don’t knock it until you have at least tried it. It might just be the right thing for you. You CAN trach an old dog new tricks as long as he has an open mind!!!
 
 
73
Jim Parks  NY0J
 
 
 
From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Kohtala via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019 2:36 PM
To: main@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR at Ozarkcon
 
 

Yes, of course, however there is a mentality afoot that repeatedly attacks FT8  (and other things they don't understand, not taking time to get the facts).  This is quite rampant and it's difficult to separate the humor from the haters. Sorry if I overreacted. I use FT8 quite regularly and find it quite awesome. For those that don't support FT8 or other modes, please don't belittle those that do. I am sure that is reciprocal in that each amateur makes personal choices. Check out FT8. You will like it. FT8 fits in perfectly for QRP and QRPp work as it is a weak signal mode. Soapbox off.

Best regards,

Gary, K7EK

Radcliff, KY (EM77at)

Sent from BlueMail
On Mar 16, 2019, at 09:36, Duane Brayton <dwbrayton@...> wrote:
Gary, 

Do you not understand humor? 

On Mar 15, 2019, at 23:39, "Gary Kohtala via Groups.Io" < yahoo.com@groups.io target=_blank>gary.k7ek= yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote: 


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