Date   

Built a Homebrew Hand Key today

Jim Sheldon
 

Found some leftover brass in the bin so I decided to make myself a
decent hand key. Came out pretty decent - 2" x 5" base, 1/2" and 3/8"
square key stock for parts, silver contacts off an old Japanese key that
got busted years ago and right now a Vibroplex bug knob with a big nylon
washer for the skirt. I plan on making a really pretty sunburst orange
Kirinite knob/skirt tomorrow but for now what's on it feels decent. It
sends better than I do - LOL.

Jim - W0EB


Assembly of my kit

keith ford
 

So I took the plunge, after looking through the manual multiple times. Those resisters are small almost like smt! But I checked them by colour and then with my DMM. Some of them are way off, like the 330k was only 198k and the 3 470ks were just at 200k.  I have an extra 1k and short a 100k.  But I have a large stash out in the garage so I'll retrieve one tomorrow and finish this stage. 

Took me a minute or two to find the markings on the pots! Dud they were on the bottom. The hand shakes have started so I'm stopping for tonight. 

More updates later, unless no one wants to read them...


Re: NorCal Doublet

RWeeks <neotoxo54@...>
 

Burtal...there has to be an english major in every group...😏. 😜

SENT FROM MY IPAD MINI
Rocky Weeks, AF5AF
East Arkansas Fur Takers, FTA Chap 29B
Arkansas Trappers Assoc.
South Western Arkansas Fur Takers, FTA Chap 29A

On Jan 31, 2017, at 18:39, john adams johnk4qq@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

 

Should have said SWR hi hi. John, K4QQ

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 31, 2017, at 6:21 PM, john adams johnk4qq@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

 

Just erected NorCal Doublet made of speaker wire as inverted vee.. RST flat on 20 and 30 with kx1 tuner but can't get it below 4.4 on 40 which is my main operating band. Any one else had this experience? John, K4QQ

Sent from my iPhone



Re: FDIM 2017 Buildathon kit announcement.

keith ford
 

Rex, when will they be available to the general public?

Keith

On Tuesday, January 31, 2017, 18:00, Rex Harper w1rex@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

 

Gangue,

I just posted the info/registration page for the FDIM 2017 Buildathon on my website.

The Buildathon this year will be a crystal oscillator and frequency combination unit suitable  for measuring crystals during the crystal grinding process....AND...we will be grinding a 'worthless' out-of-band FT-243 crystal thereby turning it into a useful 40m QRP crystal. I will be supplying a FT-243 with the kit so everyone should leave with TWO neat constructions.

Link to the website: http://qrpme.com/?p=product&id=B17

There isn't any info on the kit as it ain't been designed yet! It will be a reworking and updating of two previous designs: the 2011 Build-Along crystal checker kit and the 2105 Buildathon Frequency Counter kit. The new kit will merge both functions together and add a stable time base suitable for crystal grinding purposes.

With all the talk on the lists about FT-243 crystals, I figured it was time to bring back the Crystal Grinding workshop I hosted at the Ozarkcon convention way back in 2006. Everyone there had a blast re-working an FT-243 crystal and bringing the frequency up to 7030. A good time was had by all.

Hope to see some of you there!

Rex  W1REX


Re: NorCal Doublet

john adams <johnk4qq@...>
 

Should have said SWR hi hi. John, K4QQ

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 31, 2017, at 6:21 PM, john adams johnk4qq@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

 

Just erected NorCal Doublet made of speaker wire as inverted vee.. RST flat on 20 and 30 with kx1 tuner but can't get it below 4.4 on 40 which is my main operating band. Any one else had this experience? John, K4QQ

Sent from my iPhone


NorCal Doublet

john adams <johnk4qq@...>
 

Just erected NorCal Doublet made of speaker wire as inverted vee.. RST flat on 20 and 30 with kx1 tuner but can't get it below 4.4 on 40 which is my main operating band. Any one else had this experience? John, K4QQ

Sent from my iPhone


FDIM 2017 Buildathon kit announcement.

Rex Harper
 

Gangue,

I just posted the info/registration page for the FDIM 2017 Buildathon on my website.

The Buildathon this year will be a crystal oscillator and frequency combination unit suitable  for measuring crystals during the crystal grinding process....AND...we will be grinding a 'worthless' out-of-band FT-243 crystal thereby turning it into a useful 40m QRP crystal. I will be supplying a FT-243 with the kit so everyone should leave with TWO neat constructions.

Link to the website: http://qrpme.com/?p=product&id=B17

There isn't any info on the kit as it ain't been designed yet! It will be a reworking and updating of two previous designs: the 2011 Build-Along crystal checker kit and the 2105 Buildathon Frequency Counter kit. The new kit will merge both functions together and add a stable time base suitable for crystal grinding purposes.

With all the talk on the lists about FT-243 crystals, I figured it was time to bring back the Crystal Grinding workshop I hosted at the Ozarkcon convention way back in 2006. Everyone there had a blast re-working an FT-243 crystal and bringing the frequency up to 7030. A good time was had by all.

Hope to see some of you there!

Rex  W1REX


Re: Station Grounding Information

Phil <w0xiphil@...>
 

Terry! That was a very interesting article.
 
I’ll follow up with a read/look at William Chesney/N8SA article ~ 2003.
 
tnx & 72
Uncle Phil, w0xi
 
 



Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Re: Station Grounding Information

WA0ITP
 

Great article!
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com
On 1/29/2017 10:04 PM, Tim McDonough N9PUZ tim.n9puz@... [4sqrp] wrote:

 

Most books and articles you read on creating a good RF ground for your
station rely on you having a very short run of cable from the common
ground at your operating location to the ground rod that's just outside
the basement wall or ground floor window of your shack. This is good
advice but my ham shack locations never seem to occupy a space near this
ideal ground rod. They are in an upstairs bedroom or the most difficult
corner of the basement possible.

The following article by Tim Ellison at Flex Radio Systems discusses all
of those "easy" situations plus offers some solutions for when that
ground point is a story or so above ground or 30 feet or more from your
only accessible ground point.



Tim N9PUZ



Re: USB CI-V interface cable

Dale Putnam
 

I could sure use that!!



Have a great day,
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy

"Actions speak louder than words"
1856 - Abraham Lincoln



From: 4sqrp@... <4sqrp@...> on behalf of Wayne Dillon wayne.dillon@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 6:53 AM
To: 4sqrp@...
Subject: [4sqrp] USB CI-V interface cable
 
 

Good morning all,
I have, surplus to requirements, a CI-V USB interface cable. Allegedly works with IC 707/718/725/726/7000. likely others as well. It comes with a driver disc. Free to good home, first e-mail to tell me you want it, gets it.
Blessings all
72/3 de Wayne - NQ0RP 

--
 
QRP -  EFFICIENCY AND SKILL, NOT POWER. 
 
I'm British by birth but American by CHOICE!

Jesus came to pay a debt He didn't owe because we owe a debt we cannot pay...

The Lord bless you and keep you
The Lord make His face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you
The Lord lift up his contenance upon you and give you peace.

God Bless from Wayne Dillon - NQ0RP

Joshua 24:14-15
2 Cor 5:17
1 Jn 2:17
 
www.4sqrp.com
Welcome to the web home of the Four States QRP Group, devoted to low power (QRP) amateur radio building and operation. Club Call Sign WQ5RP
Membership Chairman - 4SQRP Group
4SQRP 40m NCS
4SQRP #95
FISTS 17184
FPQRP #342 (Flying Pigs QRP Club)
G-QRP-11504
NAQCC # 0759
QRP-ARCI #11505
SKCC #1155T
SOC #848
30MDG#1176
NEQRP #693
GORC #192
DMC (Digital Modes Club) # 06686
Zombie# 1186


Re: USB CI-V interface cable.

Wayne Dillon
 

The cable has found a new home, thanks all.
Blessings,
Wayne - NQ0RP

--
 
QRP -  EFFICIENCY AND SKILL, NOT POWER. 
 
I'm British by birth but American by CHOICE!

Jesus came to pay a debt He didn't owe because we owe a debt we cannot pay...

The Lord bless you and keep you
The Lord make His face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you
The Lord lift up his contenance upon you and give you peace.

God Bless from Wayne Dillon - NQ0RP

Joshua 24:14-15
2 Cor 5:17
1 Jn 2:17
 
Membership Chairman - 4SQRP Group
4SQRP 40m NCS
4SQRP #95
FISTS 17184
FPQRP #342 (Flying Pigs QRP Club)
G-QRP-11504
NAQCC # 0759
QRP-ARCI #11505
SKCC #1155T
SOC #848
30MDG#1176
NEQRP #693
GORC #192
DMC (Digital Modes Club) # 06686
Zombie# 1186


Re: USB CI-V interface cable

Sam Neal
 

Hello. Wayne,

If it is still available, I would like to have it.

73,

Sam. Neal. N5AF
............

------ Original Message ------
Received: 08:02 AM CST, 01/31/2017
From:
"Wayne Dillon wayne.dillon@gmail.com [4sqrp]" <4sqrp@yahoogroups.com>
To: "4sqrp@yahoogroups.com" <4sqrp@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [4sqrp] USB CI-V interface cable

Good morning all,
I have, surplus to requirements, a CI-V USB interface cable. Allegedly
works with IC 707/718/725/726/7000. likely others as well. It comes with a
driver disc. Free to good home, first e-mail to tell me you want it, gets
it.
Blessings all
72/3 de Wayne - NQ0RP

--

*QRP* - *EFFICIENCY AND SKILL, NOT POWER.*

I'm British by birth but American by CHOICE!

Jesus came to pay a debt He didn't owe because we owe a debt we cannot
pay...

The Lord bless you and keep you
The Lord make His face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you
The Lord lift up his contenance upon you and give you peace.

God Bless from Wayne Dillon - NQ0RP

Joshua 24:14-15
2 Cor 5:17
1 Jn 2:17

http://www.4sqrp.com/index.php
Membership Chairman - 4SQRP Group
4SQRP 40m NCS
4SQRP #95
FISTS 17184
FPQRP #342 (Flying Pigs QRP Club)
G-QRP-11504
NAQCC # 0759
QRP-ARCI #11505
SKCC #1155T
SOC #848
30MDG#1176
NEQRP #693
GORC #192
DMC (Digital Modes Club) # 06686
Zombie# 1186


Re: BJ

Paul Ross <deadgoose@...>
 

The only hard part, IMHO is the three winding toroid, and getting the turns/spacing correct to get us in the right tuning range.

73 /paul W3FIS


Re: Another mod to the Bayou Jumper

Jim Sheldon
 

That's another decent way to do it, but remember, if you do use an allen set screw, you'll need a long allen wrench to reach in far enough to tighten it.  There just isn't enough room normally to get a standard size allen driver in there.

Either way, you Will have to snip 1/4" (might need to snip a very little more - depends on the length of the vernier's shaft) off the tuning pot's shaft or you won't get the vernier shaft to go down far enough.

Jim - W0EB

------ Original Message ------
From: "'Larry Draughn' ldraughn@... [4sqrp]" <4sqrp@...>
To: 4sqrp@...; "'CStratton'" <groups@...>
Sent: 1/31/2017 7:50:28 AM
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] Another mod to the Bayou Jumper

Hi Folks this is what I done to make the Dial fit without buying anymore hardware, I took the 50K pot and clipped off the metal around the thermal flush with the bottom of the Pot, cut approx. ¼ inch off the shaft of the Pot and mounted flat against the PCB, added a set screw in place of the Phillips jam screw on the Dial so you can us an Allen wrench to tighten, That’s it works pretty good. Hope this helps.

 


From: 4sqrp@... [mailto:4sqrp@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 8:44 AM
To: Jim Sheldon; 4sqrp@...
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Another mod to the Bayou Jumper

 

 

Hi Jim -

 

I'm trying the vernier dial mod to my BJ. To get an extra 1/8" of clearance for the shaft, I used 3/4" standoffs instead of the 5/8" standoffs. The work to let the vernier shaft just clear the pot, but now all of the other pot shafts are too short to be engaged by the supplied knobs.

 

Grinding the vernier shaft down would work, but to get 1/8" it looks like he set screw hole will be compromised.

 

What did you find on your build?

 

Thanks,

Chip

AE5KA

 

On Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 7:49 PM, 'Jim Sheldon' w0eb@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

 

I had a 1.5" diameter Philmore vernier dial laying around so I decided to see how difficult it would be to install for tuning the Bayou Jumper which is sort of fast and difficult, but not impossible, to get just right. 

 

First, it was necessary to drill out the hole in the panel for the tuning pot to a diameter of 7/16" to allow for clearance of the shaft coupler on the vernier.  Next, it was necessary to cut the tuning pot shaft down to just over 1/4" long and the bottom of the shaft coupler still bottomed out on the frame of the pot, leaving the base of the vernier mechanism about 1/8" above the panel.  There are two options here, grind down the shaft coupler until the vernier sits flush with the panel and the coupler doesn't bind on the frame of the pot or use 1/8" or so of spacers between the panel mounting standoffs and the panel (easier at assembly time to add the spacers between the main PC board and the bottom of the standoffs).  The mounting holes for the vernier must be carefully laid out and drilled for 2-56 screws and 2 of these are used to mount it to the panel.

 

Before re-assembling the panel/pc board combination, set the shaft on the tuning pot to mid range and the vernier to midrange (#50).  Carefully fit everything into place, tighten all the panel mounting screws and other top side hardware just like you did on the initial assembly.  Next, very carefully tighten the set screw on the vernier's shaft coupler to lock it to the tuning shaft of the pot.  You will only have 180 degrees of rotation rather than the full 270 degrees but this should fall within the 7020 to 7130 range assuming you had done the calibration steps earlier.

 

I used the 1.5" Philmore S38 vernier.  The S50 is a 2" diameter dial and these are also available for somewhere around the same price or just a little more.  The S38 is the ideal one as it fits within all original markings on the Bayou Jumper's panel where the S50 will cover the word Tuning and the top will extend into, if not completely cover the original V shaped pointer at top center. 

 

It's a daunting modification and probably most won't do it, but it does really slow down the tuning and makes it much easier to tune in a CW station and it's now actually possible to also tune in the SSB stations at the high end if they fall within the tuning range.  The radio is quite stable and once tuned to a frequency I didn't observe any drift after a couple minutes of warm up.  Super job by the designers.

 

Jim - W0EB

 

 

It actually looks pretty decent mounted on the radio - helps a lot with ease of tuning in a signal.

 

 

Closer picture of the installed Philmore S38 vernier dial

 


USB CI-V interface cable

Wayne Dillon
 

Good morning all,
I have, surplus to requirements, a CI-V USB interface cable. Allegedly works with IC 707/718/725/726/7000. likely others as well. It comes with a driver disc. Free to good home, first e-mail to tell me you want it, gets it.
Blessings all
72/3 de Wayne - NQ0RP 

--
 
QRP -  EFFICIENCY AND SKILL, NOT POWER. 
 
I'm British by birth but American by CHOICE!

Jesus came to pay a debt He didn't owe because we owe a debt we cannot pay...

The Lord bless you and keep you
The Lord make His face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you
The Lord lift up his contenance upon you and give you peace.

God Bless from Wayne Dillon - NQ0RP

Joshua 24:14-15
2 Cor 5:17
1 Jn 2:17
 
Membership Chairman - 4SQRP Group
4SQRP 40m NCS
4SQRP #95
FISTS 17184
FPQRP #342 (Flying Pigs QRP Club)
G-QRP-11504
NAQCC # 0759
QRP-ARCI #11505
SKCC #1155T
SOC #848
30MDG#1176
NEQRP #693
GORC #192
DMC (Digital Modes Club) # 06686
Zombie# 1186


Re: Another mod to the Bayou Jumper

Larry Draughn
 

Hi Folks this is what I done to make the Dial fit without buying anymore hardware, I took the 50K pot and clipped off the metal around the thermal flush with the bottom of the Pot, cut approx. ¼ inch off the shaft of the Pot and mounted flat against the PCB, added a set screw in place of the Phillips jam screw on the Dial so you can us an Allen wrench to tighten, That’s it works pretty good. Hope this helps.

 


From: 4sqrp@... [mailto:4sqrp@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 8:44 AM
To: Jim Sheldon; 4sqrp@...
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Another mod to the Bayou Jumper

 

 

Hi Jim -

 

I'm trying the vernier dial mod to my BJ. To get an extra 1/8" of clearance for the shaft, I used 3/4" standoffs instead of the 5/8" standoffs. The work to let the vernier shaft just clear the pot, but now all of the other pot shafts are too short to be engaged by the supplied knobs.

 

Grinding the vernier shaft down would work, but to get 1/8" it looks like he set screw hole will be compromised.

 

What did you find on your build?

 

Thanks,

Chip

AE5KA

 

On Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 7:49 PM, 'Jim Sheldon' w0eb@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

 

I had a 1.5" diameter Philmore vernier dial laying around so I decided to see how difficult it would be to install for tuning the Bayou Jumper which is sort of fast and difficult, but not impossible, to get just right. 

 

First, it was necessary to drill out the hole in the panel for the tuning pot to a diameter of 7/16" to allow for clearance of the shaft coupler on the vernier.  Next, it was necessary to cut the tuning pot shaft down to just over 1/4" long and the bottom of the shaft coupler still bottomed out on the frame of the pot, leaving the base of the vernier mechanism about 1/8" above the panel.  There are two options here, grind down the shaft coupler until the vernier sits flush with the panel and the coupler doesn't bind on the frame of the pot or use 1/8" or so of spacers between the panel mounting standoffs and the panel (easier at assembly time to add the spacers between the main PC board and the bottom of the standoffs).  The mounting holes for the vernier must be carefully laid out and drilled for 2-56 screws and 2 of these are used to mount it to the panel.

 

Before re-assembling the panel/pc board combination, set the shaft on the tuning pot to mid range and the vernier to midrange (#50).  Carefully fit everything into place, tighten all the panel mounting screws and other top side hardware just like you did on the initial assembly.  Next, very carefully tighten the set screw on the vernier's shaft coupler to lock it to the tuning shaft of the pot.  You will only have 180 degrees of rotation rather than the full 270 degrees but this should fall within the 7020 to 7130 range assuming you had done the calibration steps earlier.

 

I used the 1.5" Philmore S38 vernier.  The S50 is a 2" diameter dial and these are also available for somewhere around the same price or just a little more.  The S38 is the ideal one as it fits within all original markings on the Bayou Jumper's panel where the S50 will cover the word Tuning and the top will extend into, if not completely cover the original V shaped pointer at top center. 

 

It's a daunting modification and probably most won't do it, but it does really slow down the tuning and makes it much easier to tune in a CW station and it's now actually possible to also tune in the SSB stations at the high end if they fall within the tuning range.  The radio is quite stable and once tuned to a frequency I didn't observe any drift after a couple minutes of warm up.  Super job by the designers.

 

Jim - W0EB

 

 

It actually looks pretty decent mounted on the radio - helps a lot with ease of tuning in a signal.

 

 

Closer picture of the installed Philmore S38 vernier dial

 


Re: Another mod to the Bayou Jumper

random.path
 

Hi Jim -

I'm trying the vernier dial mod to my BJ. To get an extra 1/8" of clearance for the shaft, I used 3/4" standoffs instead of the 5/8" standoffs. The work to let the vernier shaft just clear the pot, but now all of the other pot shafts are too short to be engaged by the supplied knobs.

Grinding the vernier shaft down would work, but to get 1/8" it looks like he set screw hole will be compromised.

What did you find on your build?

Thanks,
Chip
AE5KA

On Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 7:49 PM, 'Jim Sheldon' w0eb@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

I had a 1.5" diameter Philmore vernier dial laying around so I decided to see how difficult it would be to install for tuning the Bayou Jumper which is sort of fast and difficult, but not impossible, to get just right. 
 
First, it was necessary to drill out the hole in the panel for the tuning pot to a diameter of 7/16" to allow for clearance of the shaft coupler on the vernier.  Next, it was necessary to cut the tuning pot shaft down to just over 1/4" long and the bottom of the shaft coupler still bottomed out on the frame of the pot, leaving the base of the vernier mechanism about 1/8" above the panel.  There are two options here, grind down the shaft coupler until the vernier sits flush with the panel and the coupler doesn't bind on the frame of the pot or use 1/8" or so of spacers between the panel mounting standoffs and the panel (easier at assembly time to add the spacers between the main PC board and the bottom of the standoffs).  The mounting holes for the vernier must be carefully laid out and drilled for 2-56 screws and 2 of these are used to mount it to the panel.
 
Before re-assembling the panel/pc board combination, set the shaft on the tuning pot to mid range and the vernier to midrange (#50).  Carefully fit everything into place, tighten all the panel mounting screws and other top side hardware just like you did on the initial assembly.  Next, very carefully tighten the set screw on the vernier's shaft coupler to lock it to the tuning shaft of the pot.  You will only have 180 degrees of rotation rather than the full 270 degrees but this should fall within the 7020 to 7130 range assuming you had done the calibration steps earlier.
 
I used the 1.5" Philmore S38 vernier.  The S50 is a 2" diameter dial and these are also available for somewhere around the same price or just a little more.  The S38 is the ideal one as it fits within all original markings on the Bayou Jumper's panel where the S50 will cover the word Tuning and the top will extend into, if not completely cover the original V shaped pointer at top center. 
 
It's a daunting modification and probably most won't do it, but it does really slow down the tuning and makes it much easier to tune in a CW station and it's now actually possible to also tune in the SSB stations at the high end if they fall within the tuning range.  The radio is quite stable and once tuned to a frequency I didn't observe any drift after a couple minutes of warm up.  Super job by the designers.
 
Jim - W0EB
 
 
It actually looks pretty decent mounted on the radio - helps a lot with ease of tuning in a signal.
 
 
Closer picture of the installed Philmore S38 vernier dial



Re: Station Grounding

Bry Carling <af4k@...>
 

One thing I know. The common (white) is at a DIFFERENT potential by the time it reaches your outlet. It may be quite a few volts above ground. Certainly NOT a good idea to ever connect to another grounded point in your system.




From: Brian Ford
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2017 11:04 PM
To: 4sqrp@...; Bry Carling
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Station Grounding
 
Oh okay, I understood house wiring to be a common, plus the ground. The common being the white wire and the bare stranded wire the ground. 

Keith 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Monday, January 30, 2017, 21:44, Bry Carling af4k@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

 

>>There is no way that a ground rod will create an RF Ground for your station.

Sorry to have to say it Don but, you are mistaken


The first thing to know is that there are three functions served by grounding in ham shacks: 1. Electrical Safety 2. Stray RF Suppression (or simply RF Grounding) 3. Lightning Protection. Each has it's own set of requirements, but not all station setups need every kind of ground.


You can say it all you want. I have seen RFI problems come about in my shack when a ground wire accidentally came off a rig. I have even had RF burns off a Drake TR4 when the ground became disconnected. Don;t kid yourself tat a ground is not needed for RF reasons.


If an AC safety was the only reason for grounding equipment then the manufacturers would be satisfied with the 3rd wire ground providing a suitable ground for all amateur radio equipment. The reality is this:  I don't know of ANY reputable manufacturer that does not provide a separate terminal for that braid or green wire to go to the ground rod outside. There is a good reason for that!


I have been a radio amateur for 48 years and I know what I am talking about. I was an SWL for a few years before that and we had a buried chassis with coal and salt on it in the back garden  for lack of a costly ground rod.


You can learn more here:


http://www.arrl.org/grounding

www.arrl.org
After antennas, station grounding is probably the most discussed subject in amateur radio and it is also the one replete with the most misconceptions.




From: 4sqrp@... <4sqrp@...> on behalf of Don Wilhelm donwilh@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...>
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2017 9:09 PM
To: 4sQRP Yahoo Reflector
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Station Grounding
 
 

There is no way that a ground rod will create an RF Ground for your
station. The earth is not a 'sink' for RF energy. The ground for your
station is for AC safety and lightning protection only.
Your station ground rod must be connected to the AC mains entry ground
rod by a #6 or larger wire - that is for the safety of you and your
household as well as being a NEC requirement. The only exception is if
the ground rods are 100 feet or more apart.

For curing "RF in the shack", look to your antenna system and use means
to keep the RF off the antenna feedlines. Balanced antennas help, and
running your feedline at right angles to the antenna for at least 1/4
wavelength will help a lot, and any antenna should have an effective
common mode choke (some baluns qualify, others are poor) at the antenna
feedpoint will keep common mode RF off the feedline.

Even at QRP levels, RF-in-the-shack can cause "strange happenings". A
ground rod will not cure that problem.

Consider an 8 foot connection to a ground rod - at 28MHz the end of that
grounding point will have a high impedance to 28 MHz RF - for an RF
Ground, a very low impedance is needed, so any length of wire to the
ground will not be effective for RF - in fact, it will do quite the
opposite.

Bottom line - do not rely on a ground rod for an RF ground - it just
will not be.

73,
Don W3FPR

Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:10 pm (PST) . Posted by:
"Tim McDonough N9PUZ" tim_n9puz
Most books and articles you read on creating a good RF ground for your
station rely on you having a very short run of cable from the common
ground at your operating location to the ground rod that's just outside
the basement wall or ground floor window of your shack. This is good
advice but my ham shack locations never seem to occupy a space near this
ideal ground rod. They are in an upstairs bedroom or the most difficult
corner of the basement possible.

The following article by Tim Ellison at Flex Radio Systems discusses all
of those "easy" situations plus offers some solutions for when that
ground point is a story or so above ground or 30 feet or more from your
only accessible ground point.



Tim N9PUZ


Re: Station Grounding

Bry Carling <af4k@...>
 

Don - It's not me you are disagreeing but with ARRL. I copied and pasted. Take your semantics up with them.


If you want to get RF burns and feedback in your shack you are welcome to.



From: Don Wilhelm
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2017 11:51 PM
To: Bry Carling; 4sqrp@...
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Station Grounding
 
Bry,

I must strongly disagree.
An RF Ground must have a low impedance at all frequencies in the RF
spectrum.
Consider my example of an 8 foot wire (or braid or whatever conductor)
to a ground rod.
Yes, the impedance at the ground rod is low, but the 28MHz impedance at
the end of an 8 foot conductor is quite high.  As such it will be very
ineffective as a low impedance path to ground.
It is plain physics - a 1/4 wavelength of wire having a low impedance at
one end will have a high impedance at the other end.
What is the electrical length of the conductor to your ground rod?  No
matter what the length, it will be a quarter wavelength at some frequency.

If you want to create a low impedance RF ground path, use a wire that is
1/4 wavelength long and leave the far end open - in other words a
"counterpoise wire" - it will have a low impedance at the shack end, no
ground rod required.

Read the ARRL article you quoted carefully, for RF ground, it refers to
radials at the base of an antenna, not a ground rod - except for a 1/2
wavelength radiator.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 1/30/2017 10:44 PM, Bry Carling wrote:
> >>There is no way that a ground rod will create an RF Ground for your
> station.
>
> Sorry to have to say it Don but, you are mistaken
>
>
> The first thing to know is that there are three functions served by
> grounding in ham shacks: 1. Electrical Safety 2. Stray RF Suppression
> (or simply RF Grounding) 3. Lightning Protection. Each has it's own
> set of requirements, but not all station setups need every kind of ground.
>
>
> You can say it all you want. I have seen RFI problems come about in my
> shack when a ground wire accidentally came off a rig. I have even had
> RF burns off a Drake TR4 when the ground became disconnected. Don;t
> kid yourself tat a ground is not needed for RF reasons.
>
>
> If an AC safety was the only reason for grounding equipment then the
> manufacturers would be satisfied with the 3rd wire ground providing a
> suitable ground for all amateur radio equipment. The reality is this: 
> I don't know of ANY reputable manufacturer that does not provide a
> separate terminal for that braid or green wire to go to the ground rod
> outside. There is a good reason for that!
>
>
> I have been a radio amateur for 48 years and I know what I am talking
> about. I was an SWL for a few years before that and we had a buried
> chassis with coal and salt on it in the back garden  for lack of a
> costly ground rod.
>
>
> You can learn more here:
>
>
> http://www.arrl.org/grounding
www.arrl.org
After antennas, station grounding is probably the most discussed subject in amateur radio and it is also the one replete with the most misconceptions.

>
> Grounding - American Radio Relay League <http://www.arrl.org/grounding>
www.arrl.org
After antennas, station grounding is probably the most discussed subject in amateur radio and it is also the one replete with the most misconceptions.

> www.arrl.org
www.arrl.org
The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) is the national association for amateur radio, connecting hams around the U.S. with news, information and resources.

> After antennas, station grounding is probably the most discussed
> subject in amateur radio and it is also the one replete with the most
> misconceptions.
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* 4sqrp@... <4sqrp@...> on behalf of Don
> Wilhelm donwilh@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...>
> *Sent:* Monday, January 30, 2017 9:09 PM
> *To:* 4sQRP Yahoo Reflector
> *Subject:* Re: [4sqrp] Station Grounding
>
> There is no way that a ground rod will create an RF Ground for your
> station. The earth is not a 'sink' for RF energy. The ground for your
> station is for AC safety and lightning protection only.
> Your station ground rod must be connected to the AC mains entry ground
> rod by a #6 or larger wire - that is for the safety of you and your
> household as well as being a NEC requirement. The only exception is if
> the ground rods are 100 feet or more apart.
>
> For curing "RF in the shack", look to your antenna system and use means
> to keep the RF off the antenna feedlines. Balanced antennas help, and
> running your feedline at right angles to the antenna for at least 1/4
> wavelength will help a lot, and any antenna should have an effective
> common mode choke (some baluns qualify, others are poor) at the antenna
> feedpoint will keep common mode RF off the feedline.
>
> Even at QRP levels, RF-in-the-shack can cause "strange happenings". A
> ground rod will not cure that problem.
>
> Consider an 8 foot connection to a ground rod - at 28MHz the end of that
> grounding point will have a high impedance to 28 MHz RF - for an RF
> Ground, a very low impedance is needed, so any length of wire to the
> ground will not be effective for RF - in fact, it will do quite the
> opposite.
>
> Bottom line - do not rely on a ground rod for an RF ground - it just
> will not be.
>
> 73,
> Don W3FPR
>
> Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:10 pm (PST) . Posted by:
> "Tim McDonough N9PUZ" tim_n9puz
> Most books and articles you read on creating a good RF ground for your
> station rely on you having a very short run of cable from the common
> ground at your operating location to the ground rod that's just outside
> the basement wall or ground floor window of your shack. This is good
> advice but my ham shack locations never seem to occupy a space near this
> ideal ground rod. They are in an upstairs bedroom or the most difficult
> corner of the basement possible.
>
> The following article by Tim Ellison at Flex Radio Systems discusses all
> of those "easy" situations plus offers some solutions for when that
> ground point is a story or so above ground or 30 feet or more from your
> only accessible ground point.
>
> <https://helpdesk.flexradio.com/hc/en-us/articles/204779159-Grounding-Systems-in-the-Ham-Shack-Paradigms-Facts-and-Fallacies>
helpdesk.flexradio.com
Content provided by: Jose I. Calderon, DU1ANV - Makiling Amateur Radio Society. Member: Philippine Amateur Radio Association (PARA). Reprinted with permission of the ...

>
> Tim N9PUZ
>
>


Re: Station Grounding

Don Wilhelm
 

Bry,

I must strongly disagree.
An RF Ground must have a low impedance at all frequencies in the RF spectrum.
Consider my example of an 8 foot wire (or braid or whatever conductor) to a ground rod.
Yes, the impedance at the ground rod is low, but the 28MHz impedance at the end of an 8 foot conductor is quite high. As such it will be very ineffective as a low impedance path to ground.
It is plain physics - a 1/4 wavelength of wire having a low impedance at one end will have a high impedance at the other end.
What is the electrical length of the conductor to your ground rod? No matter what the length, it will be a quarter wavelength at some frequency.

If you want to create a low impedance RF ground path, use a wire that is 1/4 wavelength long and leave the far end open - in other words a "counterpoise wire" - it will have a low impedance at the shack end, no ground rod required.

Read the ARRL article you quoted carefully, for RF ground, it refers to radials at the base of an antenna, not a ground rod - except for a 1/2 wavelength radiator.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 1/30/2017 10:44 PM, Bry Carling wrote:
There is no way that a ground rod will create an RF Ground for your
station.

Sorry to have to say it Don but, you are mistaken


The first thing to know is that there are three functions served by grounding in ham shacks: 1. Electrical Safety 2. Stray RF Suppression (or simply RF Grounding) 3. Lightning Protection. Each has it's own set of requirements, but not all station setups need every kind of ground.


You can say it all you want. I have seen RFI problems come about in my shack when a ground wire accidentally came off a rig. I have even had RF burns off a Drake TR4 when the ground became disconnected. Don;t kid yourself tat a ground is not needed for RF reasons.


If an AC safety was the only reason for grounding equipment then the manufacturers would be satisfied with the 3rd wire ground providing a suitable ground for all amateur radio equipment. The reality is this: I don't know of ANY reputable manufacturer that does not provide a separate terminal for that braid or green wire to go to the ground rod outside. There is a good reason for that!


I have been a radio amateur for 48 years and I know what I am talking about. I was an SWL for a few years before that and we had a buried chassis with coal and salt on it in the back garden for lack of a costly ground rod.


You can learn more here:


http://www.arrl.org/grounding

Grounding - American Radio Relay League <http://www.arrl.org/grounding>
www.arrl.org
After antennas, station grounding is probably the most discussed subject in amateur radio and it is also the one replete with the most misconceptions.




------------------------------------------------------------------------
*From:* 4sqrp@yahoogroups.com <4sqrp@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of Don Wilhelm donwilh@embarqmail.com [4sqrp] <4sqrp@yahoogroups.com>
*Sent:* Monday, January 30, 2017 9:09 PM
*To:* 4sQRP Yahoo Reflector
*Subject:* Re: [4sqrp] Station Grounding

There is no way that a ground rod will create an RF Ground for your
station. The earth is not a 'sink' for RF energy. The ground for your
station is for AC safety and lightning protection only.
Your station ground rod must be connected to the AC mains entry ground
rod by a #6 or larger wire - that is for the safety of you and your
household as well as being a NEC requirement. The only exception is if
the ground rods are 100 feet or more apart.

For curing "RF in the shack", look to your antenna system and use means
to keep the RF off the antenna feedlines. Balanced antennas help, and
running your feedline at right angles to the antenna for at least 1/4
wavelength will help a lot, and any antenna should have an effective
common mode choke (some baluns qualify, others are poor) at the antenna
feedpoint will keep common mode RF off the feedline.

Even at QRP levels, RF-in-the-shack can cause "strange happenings". A
ground rod will not cure that problem.

Consider an 8 foot connection to a ground rod - at 28MHz the end of that
grounding point will have a high impedance to 28 MHz RF - for an RF
Ground, a very low impedance is needed, so any length of wire to the
ground will not be effective for RF - in fact, it will do quite the
opposite.

Bottom line - do not rely on a ground rod for an RF ground - it just
will not be.

73,
Don W3FPR

Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:10 pm (PST) . Posted by:
"Tim McDonough N9PUZ" tim_n9puz
Most books and articles you read on creating a good RF ground for your
station rely on you having a very short run of cable from the common
ground at your operating location to the ground rod that's just outside
the basement wall or ground floor window of your shack. This is good
advice but my ham shack locations never seem to occupy a space near this
ideal ground rod. They are in an upstairs bedroom or the most difficult
corner of the basement possible.

The following article by Tim Ellison at Flex Radio Systems discusses all
of those "easy" situations plus offers some solutions for when that
ground point is a story or so above ground or 30 feet or more from your
only accessible ground point.

<https://helpdesk.flexradio.com/hc/en-us/articles/204779159-Grounding-Systems-in-the-Ham-Shack-Paradigms-Facts-and-Fallacies>

Tim N9PUZ

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