Date   

Re: Ride Home

Virgil R. Hammond <n0tgr@...>
 

Dennis: was about 2:45P. and it was bad. Yes my Pruis must have good paint and the metal seems to with
stand up well as there was not one dent and it was marble size hail. Dick, n0tgr

From: Dennis Gaskill
To: Virgil R. Hammond <n0tgr@...>; 4sqrp@...
Sent: Sunday, April 7, 2013 11:21 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Ride Home
Dick;
Must be some good paint on your Prius.
We went by Beaumont at about 3:45 or 4:00 pm and saw the hail on the ground. What time did you get hailed on?
Dennis KC0IFQ
 
Sent: Sunday, April 07, 2013 9:27 PM
Subject: [4sqrp] Ride Home

 
A big thank you to Terry and all the others who made OzarkCon a success, also enjoyed eye balling
some of my PSK checkins suck as AC0BQ Jonnny , AC0WZ Dan and brother Bill, KA0KRN David
and W4RK Bill and N9PH  Jeremy.  Way to go fellows and come back often.
Ran into a bad hail storm at Beaumont, KS and had to park roadside for 15 minutes and that marble
size hail covered the ground. But my Toyota Prius survived w/o any dents through lots of prayers.
Enjoyed the fellowship and ready for next year.  Dick, N0TGR


Re: Ride Home

Tom Sevart <n2uhc@...>
 

On 04/08/2013 06:18, Paul Smith wrote:


The hail storm came over Humboldt and was golf ball size. The camper
roof has damage, the car and truck look like someone took a hammer to
them. Farm Bureau gets a call today... De Paul N0NBD
Sorry to hear that. I was busy mowing my grass before the rain came, but we didn't get any rain. I did see some stormn clouds off to the north so that was probably the storm that got you.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS


SOTA-rama in the Ozarks

Bill Gerth
 

SOTA-RAMA in the Ozarks
Spring 2013

If you thought there were lots of W0M-Missouri SOTA activations in the Eureka Springs Escarpment Region (ES) of Missouri plus a lot of activations in the Buffalo River Region of AR over the week-end, there's a good reason for it.  A goodly number of SOTA enthusiasts from MO, AR, NM, and KS gathered in Branson, MO to attend the 10th Anniversary of OzarkCon 2013, the excellent QRP conference sponsored by the Four State QRP Group (MO, AR, KS, OK).  SOTA had a good presence in the vendor exhibit area with two tables filled with pictures of SOTA adventures and lots of handouts for visitors.  KD5ZZK, W4RK, and W0MNA had a lot of interest shown in their exhibit and I wouldn't be surprised if we had quite a few new SOTA enthusiasts joining the fun in the near future.

Of course, having four (4) MO summits nearby plus quite a few AR summits just over the state line didn't hurt either.  I'm still waiting for tallies of numbers of QSOs from activators, but here is a summary of the separate qualifying activations that occurred from Thursday through Sunday with a nice mix of CW and SSB.  Several of us even got in some VHF Summit-to-Summit contacts.

W0M/ES-001 (Webster County HP) - NM5S, K5SSR, KD5ZZK, N0SA, W4RK
W0M/ES-002 (Romance Lookout) - KD5ZZK, K5SSR, NM5S
W0M/ES-003 (Pilot Knob) - W0MNA, W0AO, N0EVH, N0SA, W4RK
W0M/ES-004 (PT 1270) - W0MNA, W0AO, N0EVH, N0SA, KD5ZZK
W5A/BR-015 (Irons Mtn) - KD5ZZK
W5A/BR-016 (Sugarloaf Mtn) - KD5ZZK
W5A/BR-012 (Whitney Mtn) - KD5ZZK, NM5S, K5SSR
W5O/SO-026 (Hi Early Mtn) - K5SSR, NM5S

I'm sure KD5ZZK probably snuck one in there that I missed, but that is still a nice collection of Activators and Summits.  From my count, that makes 25 separate activations of 8 different summits.  Bear in mind that these activators also attended most of the excellent presentations at OzarkCon and manned the SOTA booth throughout.

Thanks to the 4 State QRP Group for wonderful hospitality and for giving us SOTA hams a good excuse to get together in Branson for some great fellowship with QRPers and doing what we love most: taking those QRP radios up to the summit and giving Chasers a lot of points.  SOTA and QRP makes a good combination.

73,
BILL GERTH, W4RK
SOTA USA W0M-Missouri
Association Manager


Re: Recommendations wanted on where to start

James Vroman AC0BN
 

My HF rig (ICOM 751a) developed an intermittent problem last field day.
of course it decides to work beautifully whenever I decide to troubleshoot on it. It is much bigger than I am wanting to carry in a pack and I had thought about an FT-817 but decided I wanted something I could build.
I have been an electronics hobbiest since the early 80s. I got my first license back then (Novice KA0PHN). I moved to Dallas and worked for Rockwell/Collins Defence Communications before I got into computers. Been primarily playing with microcontrollers and robots since then. I got back into Amateur Radio in 2004 when I moved back to Missouri. I started looking into QRP then but got sidetracked into storm spotting and ARES. Last month I went to an Advanced Wilderness Survival Class with some other Hams. We packed in gear but it was way too heavy and bulky. This got me fired up on QRP again so I decided this was the year. I love soldering and building things. I need to get a new scope - my old Tek has about had it. I have access to a 100mhz one at work though.

Hi James!

You might tell us a little about your building skills and experience.
There are a couple of small, multi-band kits available but they are more
challenging to build that some of the single band offerings.

Do you have an HF radio now that can be throttled back to 5W? If so
that's certainly the cheapest, quickest way to jump into QRP operation.

73,

Tim N9PUZ


Re: Ozarkcon

Nick-WA5BDU
 

Enjoyed yet another OzarkCon. Haven't missed one since the earliest days of ArkieCon.

The seminars were all interesting. The most exciting to me was the description of the upcoming Cyclone 40 transceiver. It's got a whole bunch of really unique and clever design features, and the receiver tested right up with the most expensive commercial rigs. Going from memory -- the thing has a receive mixer using four MOSFETs which also acts as the final amplifier in transmit mode! Through some kind of sleight of hand I didn't understand fully, this allows simple T/R switching with QSK possible up to 100 WPM. There's an analog permeability tuned VFO and soon to be added frequency annunciation MCU. Also what looks like a really interesting AGC circuit to keep you from getting blasted by strong signals. A four pole Gaussian (?) crystal filter that's supposed to sound better than the typical Cohn type. A wide range of battery voltages is usable too, like the ATS-3. Now I have to decide what 40M rig to get rid of.

Missed a few people, but it still seems like there was good attendance and I enjoyed meeting with a number of old friends I see but once a year.

73-

Nick, WA5BDU


Re: Ozark QRP Banner

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Hey Walter:
Good to see you and Joy at Ozarkcon.
Congrats on your plaque, well deserved with out a doubt!
I skimmed through the Banner last night, and as always another home run!
Loved the pics!
Keep up the good work.
CU soon.
Johnny AC0BQ


On Sat, Apr 6, 2013 at 9:38 PM, Walter - K5EST <walter.k5est@...> wrote:
 

Trying to get last minute things done before getting
out of Internet access, so I have forwarded the
April QRP Banner to the webmaster, and when
he has a chance it can be posted on the Group
website. Thanks for everyone's patience since
many of us are traveling from OzarkCon and
communications to the web are a little different.

There are lots of random pictures of the Conference.

72/73....Walter - K5EST







Re: Recommendations wanted on where to start

Charlie Vest
 

Many of these are in every good QRP'ers box of goodies . Many people still using them regularly . The Pixie2 is not for the beginner or feint of heart to start off operating with , in my humble opinion . Any of the other transceivers would be great to get on the air with and have some fun playing and making a few contacts and you have two nice pieces of QRP gear to get your antenna setup with .

Charlie , W5COV

 

Thanks for the info
I went digging this afternoon after work and found my box of QRP kits that I had bought when I first got back into Amateur Radio.
I found the following:

Tenna dipper
Rock Mite 40
PSK-80 Warbler
NoGawaTT SWR Wattmeter
Marker generator kit
Pixie2 QRP transceiver
8044ABM Iambic Keyer Kit

How would you rate them?

--- In 4sqrp@..., "Todd F. Carney / K7TFC" wrote:
>
>
> On Mon, Apr 8, 2013 at 12:33 PM, James "Chewy" Vroman
> wrote:
>
> > **
> > I have been interested in QRP for a long time and have decided that this
> > is the year. I will be relearning my Morse and am looking for
> > recommendations on a QRP transceiver kit as well as any other
> > recommendations to build a complete portable station. I am wanting
> > something small and light to carry backpacking.
> >
>
> James,
>
> Ask 100 QRPers that question and you'll get at least 200 answers! Everyone
> has his favorite, or has not had good luck with one or more. Rather than
> offer a specific recommendation, here's a few general things to consider.
>
> 1. First of all, go to the DXZone site and browse through their listing of
> QRP "manufactures" (in quotes because often the "factory" is the garage or
> chicken coop out back).
> http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Manufacturers/QRP_Kits/. A large proportion
> of these kits are offered by hams as a side business (to save up for their
> new tower or for that $200 iambic key they're been wanting, etc.). This is
> no comment on the quality of the kits. Mostly, they are excellent designs,
> with high-quality PCBs and parts. Actually, I think the parts are typically
> of a higher quality than kits offered by established companies
> (Ten-Tec/You-Kits, MFJ, etc.) because ham kit makers tend to buy from an
> engineering and serious-hobbyist supply chain (Mouser, Digikey, etc) rather
> than the chain for mass-produced electronics. In many cases, those offering
> the kits are also the designers, and they are either professional engineers
> or they are talented and well-grounded amateurs. Either way, there's not
> much between you and the designer, and most try hard to reply to questions
> (though it's a side-business and they do have lives--some patience is
> sometimes called for).
>
> 2. Most of the kits have been reviewed by homebrewing hams. These can be
> found in a number different places, including personal blogs and the
> discussion groups. The eHam site usually comes up near the top of a Google
> search for the kit in question and the word "review." You can also go
> directly to their review page: http://www.eham.net/reviews/ and search from
> there.
>
> 3. Avoid the lower-powered kits for now. Build one as close to the maximum
> 5-Watt QRP definition as you can. I imagine they'll be many who disagree,
> but higher power will make it more likely you'll have enough QSOs to keep
> the excitement up and to let the QRP bug bite hard. This is especially true
> if you're using a low-gain "compromise" antenna. Later, you can get into
> QRPp--very low power--if you want.
>
> 4. Most QRP kits are CW only, but there are a few with SSB as well. They
> are necessarily more complex than for CW only, but they do offer the
> code-challenged ham someone to talk to while they learn and/or improve
> their code. Personally, I'd stick with CW only because, 1) they are easier
> rigs to build at first so you don't get bogged down in the construction,
> and 2) a code-only rig is a good spur to learning and practicing the code.
>
> 5. Which band? I'll leave that mostly for others to answer, but generally
> I'd start with whatever is active wherever you spend most of your time.
> Okay, here's one suggestion: 20 meters. It's good for daytime QSOs,
> sometimes of a 1000 miles or more. Here's a video by John W5CYF of a 20m
> QSO from the gulf-coast of Mississippi to W1AW in Connecticut:
> http://youtu.be/IGg92YR-pTA. By the way, W5CYF has over 175 videos on
> YouTube, and I'd say at least half of them are on QRP and/or kit building.
> Lots of other kit-building videos on YouTube as well.
>
> 6. If you haven't already, take a look at SOTA--Summits on the Air. It's an
> association of hiker-hams that started in England but has now spread nearly
> everywhere. Each country or region has its own SOTA association and, in the
> United States at least, subdivided down further (by state, etc.). The idea
> is that you win points for "activating" (making QSOs from) a registered
> summit, lower points for low, short, and/or easy hikes, and more pointsr
> for challenging summits. One can also earn points as a "spotter" of a
> summit activation. This would be someone who answered a CQ from a summit,
> at home and in his pajamas, maybe. This is a way those not able (or
> willing) to climb summits can participate, and anyway it's how activation
> QSOs are documented. Like most "radio sport," there's certificates, pins,
> rolls of honor, etc. Here's a few SOTA sites: http://www.sota.org.uk/ (the
> central site), and for you in Missouri:
> http://www.sota.org.uk/Associations/viewAssociation/prefix/W0M. It was
> started just 6 weeks ago. So far, MO has 49 qualifying summits. Of course,
> you can activate a summit anywhere in the world that's listed as a SOTA
> summit.
>
> I'm sure you'll get lots of other input from the group. Welcome to the
> wacky world of QRP.
>
> 73,
>
> Todd
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> K7TFC / Medford, Oregon, USA / CN82ni / UTC-8
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> QRP (CW & SSB) / EmComm / SOTA / Homebrew / Design
>



Re: Recommendations wanted on where to start

Tim N9PUZ
 

On 4/8/2013 2:33 PM, James "Chewy" Vroman wrote:
I have been interested in QRP for a long time and have decided that this
is the year.
I will be relearning my Morse and am looking for recommendations on a
QRP transceiver kit as well as any other recommendations to build a
complete portable station.
I am wanting something small and light to carry backpacking.
All ideas are appreciated!!!
Hi James!

You might tell us a little about your building skills and experience. There are a couple of small, multi-band kits available but they are more challenging to build that some of the single band offerings.

Do you have an HF radio now that can be throttled back to 5W? If so that's certainly the cheapest, quickest way to jump into QRP operation.

73,

Tim N9PUZ


Re: Recommendations wanted on where to start

James Vroman AC0BN
 

Thanks for the info
I went digging this afternoon after work and found my box of QRP kits that I had bought when I first got back into Amateur Radio.
I found the following:

Tenna dipper
Rock Mite 40
PSK-80 Warbler
NoGawaTT SWR Wattmeter
Marker generator kit
Pixie2 QRP transceiver
8044ABM Iambic Keyer Kit

How would you rate them?

--- In 4sqrp@yahoogroups.com, "Todd F. Carney / K7TFC" <k7tfc@...> wrote:


On Mon, Apr 8, 2013 at 12:33 PM, James "Chewy" Vroman <james@...>
wrote:

**
I have been interested in QRP for a long time and have decided that this
is the year. I will be relearning my Morse and am looking for
recommendations on a QRP transceiver kit as well as any other
recommendations to build a complete portable station. I am wanting
something small and light to carry backpacking.
James,

Ask 100 QRPers that question and you'll get at least 200 answers! Everyone
has his favorite, or has not had good luck with one or more. Rather than
offer a specific recommendation, here's a few general things to consider.

1. First of all, go to the DXZone site and browse through their listing of
QRP "manufactures" (in quotes because often the "factory" is the garage or
chicken coop out back).
http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Manufacturers/QRP_Kits/. A large proportion
of these kits are offered by hams as a side business (to save up for their
new tower or for that $200 iambic key they're been wanting, etc.). This is
no comment on the quality of the kits. Mostly, they are excellent designs,
with high-quality PCBs and parts. Actually, I think the parts are typically
of a higher quality than kits offered by established companies
(Ten-Tec/You-Kits, MFJ, etc.) because ham kit makers tend to buy from an
engineering and serious-hobbyist supply chain (Mouser, Digikey, etc) rather
than the chain for mass-produced electronics. In many cases, those offering
the kits are also the designers, and they are either professional engineers
or they are talented and well-grounded amateurs. Either way, there's not
much between you and the designer, and most try hard to reply to questions
(though it's a side-business and they do have lives--some patience is
sometimes called for).

2. Most of the kits have been reviewed by homebrewing hams. These can be
found in a number different places, including personal blogs and the
discussion groups. The eHam site usually comes up near the top of a Google
search for the kit in question and the word "review." You can also go
directly to their review page: http://www.eham.net/reviews/ and search from
there.

3. Avoid the lower-powered kits for now. Build one as close to the maximum
5-Watt QRP definition as you can. I imagine they'll be many who disagree,
but higher power will make it more likely you'll have enough QSOs to keep
the excitement up and to let the QRP bug bite hard. This is especially true
if you're using a low-gain "compromise" antenna. Later, you can get into
QRPp--very low power--if you want.

4. Most QRP kits are CW only, but there are a few with SSB as well. They
are necessarily more complex than for CW only, but they do offer the
code-challenged ham someone to talk to while they learn and/or improve
their code. Personally, I'd stick with CW only because, 1) they are easier
rigs to build at first so you don't get bogged down in the construction,
and 2) a code-only rig is a good spur to learning and practicing the code.

5. Which band? I'll leave that mostly for others to answer, but generally
I'd start with whatever is active wherever you spend most of your time.
Okay, here's one suggestion: 20 meters. It's good for daytime QSOs,
sometimes of a 1000 miles or more. Here's a video by John W5CYF of a 20m
QSO from the gulf-coast of Mississippi to W1AW in Connecticut:
http://youtu.be/IGg92YR-pTA. By the way, W5CYF has over 175 videos on
YouTube, and I'd say at least half of them are on QRP and/or kit building.
Lots of other kit-building videos on YouTube as well.

6. If you haven't already, take a look at SOTA--Summits on the Air. It's an
association of hiker-hams that started in England but has now spread nearly
everywhere. Each country or region has its own SOTA association and, in the
United States at least, subdivided down further (by state, etc.). The idea
is that you win points for "activating" (making QSOs from) a registered
summit, lower points for low, short, and/or easy hikes, and more pointsr
for challenging summits. One can also earn points as a "spotter" of a
summit activation. This would be someone who answered a CQ from a summit,
at home and in his pajamas, maybe. This is a way those not able (or
willing) to climb summits can participate, and anyway it's how activation
QSOs are documented. Like most "radio sport," there's certificates, pins,
rolls of honor, etc. Here's a few SOTA sites: http://www.sota.org.uk/ (the
central site), and for you in Missouri:
http://www.sota.org.uk/Associations/viewAssociation/prefix/W0M. It was
started just 6 weeks ago. So far, MO has 49 qualifying summits. Of course,
you can activate a summit anywhere in the world that's listed as a SOTA
summit.

I'm sure you'll get lots of other input from the group. Welcome to the
wacky world of QRP.

73,

Todd
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
K7TFC / Medford, Oregon, USA / CN82ni / UTC-8
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
QRP (CW & SSB) / EmComm / SOTA / Homebrew / Design


Re: Recommendations wanted on where to start

Todd K7TFC
 

On Mon, Apr 8, 2013 at 12:33 PM, James "Chewy" Vroman <james@...> wrote:
I have been interested in QRP for a long time and have decided that this is the year. I will be relearning my Morse and am looking for recommendations on a QRP transceiver kit as well as any other recommendations to build a complete portable station. I am wanting something small and light to carry backpacking.

James,

Ask 100 QRPers that question and you'll get at least 200 answers! Everyone has his favorite, or has not had good luck with one or more. Rather than offer a specific recommendation, here's a few general things to consider.

1. First of all, go to the DXZone site and browse through their listing of QRP "manufactures" (in quotes because often the "factory" is the garage or chicken coop out back). http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Manufacturers/QRP_Kits/. A large proportion of these kits are offered by hams as a side business (to save up for their new tower or for that $200 iambic key they're been wanting, etc.). This is no comment on the quality of the kits. Mostly, they are excellent designs, with high-quality PCBs and parts. Actually, I think the parts are typically of a higher quality than kits offered by established companies (Ten-Tec/You-Kits, MFJ, etc.) because ham kit makers tend to buy from an engineering and serious-hobbyist supply chain (Mouser, Digikey, etc) rather than the chain for mass-produced electronics. In many cases, those offering the kits are also the designers, and they are either professional engineers or they are talented and well-grounded amateurs. Either way, there's not much between you and the designer, and most try hard to reply to questions (though it's a side-business and they do have lives--some patience is sometimes called for).

2. Most of the kits have been reviewed by homebrewing hams. These can be found in a number different places, including personal blogs and the discussion groups. The eHam site usually comes up near the top of a Google search for the kit in question and the word "review." You can also go directly to their review page: http://www.eham.net/reviews/ and search from there.

3. Avoid the lower-powered kits for now. Build one as close to the maximum 5-Watt QRP definition as you can. I imagine they'll be many who disagree, but higher power will make it more likely you'll have enough QSOs to keep the excitement up and to let the QRP bug bite hard. This is especially true if you're using a low-gain "compromise" antenna. Later, you can get into QRPp--very low power--if you want.  

4. Most QRP kits are CW only, but there are a few with SSB as well. They are necessarily more complex than for CW only, but they do offer the code-challenged ham someone to talk to while they learn and/or improve their code. Personally, I'd stick with CW only because, 1) they are easier rigs to build at first so you don't get bogged down in the construction, and 2) a code-only rig is a good spur to learning and practicing the code. 

5. Which band? I'll leave that mostly for others to answer, but generally I'd start with whatever is active wherever you spend most of your time. Okay, here's one suggestion: 20 meters. It's good for daytime QSOs, sometimes of a 1000 miles or more. Here's a video by John W5CYF of a 20m QSO from the gulf-coast of Mississippi to W1AW in Connecticut: http://youtu.be/IGg92YR-pTA. By the way, W5CYF has over 175 videos on YouTube, and I'd say at least half of them are on QRP and/or kit building. Lots of other kit-building videos on YouTube as well.   

6. If you haven't already, take a look at SOTA--Summits on the Air. It's an association of hiker-hams that started in England but has now spread nearly everywhere. Each country or region has its own SOTA association and, in the United States at least, subdivided down further (by state, etc.). The idea is that you win points for "activating" (making QSOs from) a registered summit, lower points for low, short, and/or easy hikes, and more pointsr for challenging summits. One can also earn points as a "spotter" of a summit activation. This would be someone who answered a CQ from a summit, at home and in his pajamas, maybe. This is a way those not able (or willing) to climb summits can participate, and anyway it's how activation QSOs are documented. Like most "radio sport," there's certificates, pins, rolls of honor, etc. Here's a few SOTA sites: http://www.sota.org.uk/ (the central site), and for you in Missouri: http://www.sota.org.uk/Associations/viewAssociation/prefix/W0M. It was started just 6 weeks ago. So far, MO has 49 qualifying summits. Of course, you can activate a summit anywhere in the world that's listed as a SOTA summit.

I'm sure you'll get lots of other input from the group. Welcome to the wacky world of QRP. 

73,

Todd
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
K7TFC / Medford, Oregon, USA / CN82ni / UTC-8
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
QRP (CW & SSB) / EmComm / SOTA / Homebrew / Design



Re: OzarkCon is Over

Darwin Piatt
 

Hello from Nebraska.
We had an enjoyable 7 hour drive back to Omaha, Only a little rain as we crossed the Iowa border.
We were once again pleased at the turn out for the Build-a-Thon. Over 30, that's great. I believe most builders went home with a finished product.
I was (is) a great little gadget and now we get to start the "what are we going to build in 2014" process.
I figure Dave can come up with something cool again? after all, he will have another full year to play. :)
Both Darrel and I and the rest of the Midwest HomeBrewers group appreciate the turn out and had our normal amount of fun.
Please come back again next year!
73's from all of us here
Dar..
--
Dar W9HZC


Re: Parts list for beginning builder

John Taylor <k0qh@...>
 

Thanks to Terry and everyone for a great time. I also feel that if there was
someway to lengthen Ozarkcon it would make an already great event that much
better. The last 2 years I have gotten in around noon on Thursday and have all
day Friday as do many others. Sunday is the get up eat and leave day for most
everyone. After all, quite a few of us are retired and glad to meet and greet.
As for FDIM, I've yet to attend as I'd rather spend the $ on Ozarkcon, I haven't
been to Dayton since 1986 and don't feel the need, money only goes so far.

The kit build session was a lot of fun and I got a nice project out of it.
Just a straw poll but how many come on Thursday or would be able to?
Thanks
72/73

John Taylor,K0QH
PB #174
SLQS
4SQRP
www.stgdxcc.webs.com

----- Original Message ----
From: John R. Lonigro <jonigro@gmail.com>
To: 4sqrp@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, April 8, 2013 5:44:20 AM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Re: Parts list for beginning builder

Terry et al:

I need to add my thanks as well. It was definitely a good weekend. I
look forward to it every year.

As far as lasting two full days, if people just want to talk QRP longer,
they can show up early Friday afternoon and leave at checkout time
Sunday. That's pretty close to two days, without any additional effort
on the organizers' parts. With FDIM only 6 weeks later, there's no
reason to officially extend the event. I'm sure Terry and all the other
organizers had their hands full as it is (and they did a great job).

John AA0VE

On 04/07/2013 09:45 PM, Tom Sevart wrote:

On 04/07/2013 14:12, Woody Hester wrote:

Ozarkcon is over too fast. We need
to make it a full week hi hi!&#92;
Or at least two full days! I could sit around and talk about
homebrewing for days. I just wish I could come down earlier. Perhaps
next time I'll take two days off and come down a day earlier.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS



------------------------------------

4SQRP Website: http://4sqrp.com
OzarkCon is coming April 5-6 in Branson, MO
View Details at http://www.ozarkcon.com/index.phpYahoo! Groups Links


Recommendations wanted on where to start

James Vroman AC0BN
 

I have been interested in QRP for a long time and have decided that this is the year.
I will be relearning my Morse and am looking for recommendations on a QRP transceiver kit as well as any other recommendations to build a complete portable station.
I am wanting something small and light to carry backpacking.
All ideas are appreciated!!!

James "Chewy" Vroman
AC0BN



Re: Ozark QRP Banner

W0IIT
 

Walter & Joy,

Great seeing the pair of you at Ocon!! Who would have guessed that you were attending every thing that was going on at Ocon, socializing, and at the same time(behind the scene) you were working on the Banner!!! I have said it before and will say it again Walter, "you da man!!!!".

Joy thanks for helping out Patsy. She was looking to say thanks personally yesterday morning but I bet you guys got up and hit the road early for Houston.

Drive safely!!

cu, Bart


Re: Ozarkcon

WA1EDJ
 

I saw in the agenda for Ozarkon the mention of the  Cyclone 40 kit introduction......I was not able to attend....what is this kit?

Bob  WA1EDJ


On Mon, Apr 8, 2013 at 9:29 AM, nm0s_qrp <ai9e_qrp@...> wrote:
What can I say that hasn't already been said - Ozarkcon 2013 was an amazing time.  Thanks to all who worked so hard to make it a success.  The hard part is waiting a year until the next one!

73 Dave NM0S



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Ozarkcon

nm0s_qrp <ai9e_qrp@...>
 

What can I say that hasn't already been said - Ozarkcon 2013 was an amazing time. Thanks to all who worked so hard to make it a success. The hard part is waiting a year until the next one!

73 Dave NM0S


Re: ozarkcon.........great

Jim Sheldon
 

Tired?  Tired don't get it by half, but it was an absolutely fun weekend.  N5LXW and I left Branson around 8:00 Sunday morning.  We must have rolled through Beaumont sometime before the hailstorm hit as we didn't even get rained on.  The skies to the South were really dark looking pretty much all the way along highway 400, but didn't notice any lightening during our drive.  We stopped at Bacani Plaza just outside of Fredonia about 11:30 for a short munchie break and got to my place in Park City around 1:30.  It sprinkled a few drops as we were unloading the car and getting all of N5LXW's stuff transferred to his car so he could head up to Newton, but that was all the precip of any type we saw the whole trip.  To top that off, only had .01" of rain in the gauge this morning.  Need MORE here -
 
Sorry you guys got hailed on - Paul, you apparently got hammered!  OUCH!  Don'cha just hate it when that happens!!!!  Glad everybody that has reported in got home safely.
 
Jim - W0EB

>The Enigma machine is actually from the website called -- www.cryptomuseum.com
> which, I think is in Holland, not Bletchley Park, England.  That
> website has a lot of info on the old cipher and crypto machines,
> including simulators for the Enigma and the American KL-7 that can
> be downloaded and run on just about any PC.  The simulators actually work just like
> the real machines did.
>
> Jim - W0EB
>
>
>> On 04/07/2013 13:42, Phil Anderson wrote:
>>
>>> Yup, a neat show and good talks. Tom, I too noted Woody's
>>> electronic Enigma simulator and it sure was a beautiful and
>>> neat project. He indicated we could order it through a
>>> group/museum? in the UK.....search via google to find. Anybody
>>> else tired? Hi. Unk Phil
 
>
>
>


Re: PigRig program button stopped working

Stephen Roberts <steverob@...>
 

I just occurred to me that when I built the rig the wire I used for the power in was heavier gauge than spec'd and I could only get one turn around the ferrite choke. Could that be the problem? Maybe an external choke on the power input would help?

Steve



On Apr 7, 2013, at 5:09 PM, Todd F. Carney / K7TFC wrote:

 

Steve,

Do you think noise might be getting in and screwing up the keyer chip? Something peculiar to your environment or DC source, maybe? The Vcc bypass cap, C23, is about as close as it could be to the chip, but I wonder what adding, say, 1uF *and* a .01uF caps across C23 to provide a range of low-impedance paths for a wider range of noise frequencies? I also wonder if you could have a bad D7? Or for that matter anything else in the power chain. If your PR is naked, I wonder what an enclosure might do?

Sorry if these ideas have already been mentioned.

73,

Todd
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
K7TFC / Medford, Oregon, USA / CN82ni / UTC-8
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
QRP (CW & SSB) / EmComm / SOTA / Homebrew / Design


On Sun, Apr 7, 2013 at 11:17 AM, w1sfr <steverob@...> wrote:
 

I spoke too soon. It worked fine for about 5 minutes then the keyer went whacky again. Now I'm getting weird sounds when I key down. If I hit the switch the sidetone sounds fine, but as soon as I start to send, there's a very loud hum as I key it. I tried different keys thinking it might be a plug or something, but I'm back to thinking that it's the keyer IC.

Steve



--- In 4sqrp@..., "w1sfr" wrote:
>
> Ok guys, here's an update.
>
> Well, the keyer chip has mysteriously rebooted itself and is now working. Don't ask me what happened. I took the rig to the shop and checked everything. I found that the stock switch was indeed intermittent so I installed a mini toggle switch for now until I can locate a momentary switch like the one that came with the kit. While I was at it, I installed a power indicator led light which will be helpful when I operate via battery. I also discovered in the process that one of my APP connectors in a 3 way dongle that I built is not good, which explains the sudden and nerve wracking loss of power which at the time I took as a very bad sign.
>
> Anyhoo, all is well and the radio is happily chirping along. Now all I have to do is get someone to answer my call and confirm my calling freq and all will be well in the world.
>
> 72
> Steve
> W1SFR
>
>
> --- In 4sqrp@..., "w1sfr" wrote:
> >
> > I decided to try to realign my xmit freq and adjusted the cap so I heard a good signal on 7030.7 on my big rig.
> >
> > After doing that, I put everything back together and hooked it up and now I don't have any control of my keyer.
> >
> > What should I look for?
> >
> > Steve
> > W1SFR
> >
>






Re: Ride Home

Paul Smith
 

The hail storm came over Humboldt and was golf ball size. The camper roof has damage, the car and truck look like someone took a hammer to them. Farm Bureau gets a call today... De Paul N0NBD

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 7, 2013, at 9:27 PM, "Virgil R. Hammond" <n0tgr@...> wrote:

 

A big thank you to Terry and all the others who made OzarkCon a success, also enjoyed eye balling
some of my PSK checkins suck as AC0BQ Jonnny , AC0WZ Dan and brother Bill, KA0KRN David
and W4RK Bill and N9PH  Jeremy.  Way to go fellows and come back often.
Ran into a bad hail storm at Beaumont, KS and had to park roadside for 15 minutes and that marble
size hail covered the ground. But my Toyota Prius survived w/o any dents through lots of prayers.
Enjoyed the fellowship and ready for next year.  Dick, N0TGR


Re: ozarkcon.........great

Jim Sheldon
 

It's actually from the website called -- www.cryptomuseum.com which, I think is in Holland, not Bletchley Park, England.  That website has a lot of info on the old cipher and crypto machines, including simulators for the Enigma and the American KL-7 that can be downloaded and run on just about any PC.  
 
Jim - W0EB


> On 04/07/2013 13:42, Phil Anderson wrote:
>
>> Yup, a neat show and good talks. Tom, I too noted Woody's
>> electronic Enigma simulator and it sure was a beautiful and neat
>> project. He indicated we could order it through a group/museum?
>> in the UK.....search via google to find. Anybody else tired? Hi.
>> Unk Phil
>>
>
> I think he said he got it from the museum at Bletchly Park.
>
> Yes, I'm tired as well.  A 3 hour drive and met up with the wife &
> in-laws in Pittsburg for dinner, then came home to mow the grass
> before it started raining again, which it didn't.  Then had a
> number of other things to do so no chance of a nap for me at all.
>
> --
> Tom Sevart N2UHC
> St. Paul, KS
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> 4SQRP Website: http://4sqrp.com
> OzarkCon is coming April 5-6 in Branson, MO
> View Details at http://www.ozarkcon.com/index.phpYahoo! Groups Links
>
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