Date   

Re: DMR information

Robin Kidd <w4ien@...>
 

How is DMR different than D-Star? Is it better, the same? Is there an advantage over D-Star?


72/73,
Robin
W4IEN
EM73vx

On September 14, 2018 at 9:42 PM "Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io" <doctorcwp@...> wrote:

It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


Re: DMR information

Dwayne R <masterdr@...>
 

In other words, this is like that CQ-100 VOIP stuff, is this correct?



--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 9/14/18, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: [4SQRP] DMR information
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 8:42 PM

It was brought to my attention that
perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i
will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and
what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio
that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech
for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is
also includes a way of accessing other radios and users
world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios,
and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can
"talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area,
or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is
that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that
allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone
to access the network.  In the case of the Four States
QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations
regardless of where each of us is located, formal or
informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who
is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our
Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or
all of these activities, plus any others that fall within
the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's
not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the
way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the
way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St.
Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in
their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I
have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door.
(Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).
 I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk
Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would
otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios
are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and
figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you
want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also
generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.
 It is a bit more complicated than just entering a
frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a
target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code"
(roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your
radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and
finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are
going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as
much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It
does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol
using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end
than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio
is about communicating and DMR does a good job of
facilitating that.  Think of it as having a
"local" repeater that any one of us can access at
any time, regardless of our physical location.
 That's why there is some excitement over the
prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own
talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to
answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's
how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most
popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone
D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the
"OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"
 I will stay away from others because I'm not as
familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and
Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the
whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or
so.


Re: DMR information

Paul Smith
 

Cool BEANS! Chas! tnx

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> on behalf of Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp@...>
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 8:42:19 PM
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Subject: [4SQRP] DMR information
 
It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


DMR information

Charles W. Powell
 

It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Mike Heitmann
 

Here is a good intro from the Missouri Digital Group:

72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at 7:59 PM, Wayne Dillon <wayne.dillon@...> wrote:

Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup 101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it. Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be a burden but I really have no clue.
Be blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Paul
The antenna he was using was a tekecopic antenna from MFJ,
I think?
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 7:24 PM Jim Sheldon <w0eb@...> wrote:
Mind posting the amazon name for that one?  No luck searching for it.

W0EB

> On Sep 14, 2018, at 6:59 PM, ussv dharma via Groups.Io <ussvdharma=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Do a google search involving amazon, I did that and got the clamp for much less thant the $35.
>
>
> If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!
>
> MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
> W7KFI  & AFZ4SM
>
>
> --------------------------------------------
> On Fri, 9/14/18, Paul Smith <n0nbd@...> wrote:
>
> Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount
> To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
> Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 6:06 PM
>
> Where does a guy look for one
> de Paul N0NBD
>
>
>
>
>
>




--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Ge Wayne
Chas NK8O is working up a explanation for the group.
This was discussed at Ozarkcon, and it sounded like a possible way for the group to communicate during low cycle times.

For now just google DMR open source radio, and best of all it’s still Qrp !

72
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 7:59 PM Wayne Dillon <wayne.dillon@...> wrote:
Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup 101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it. Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be a burden but I really have no clue.
Be blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP

--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Charles W. Powell
 


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Wayne Dillon
 

Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup 101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it. Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be a burden but I really have no clue.
Be blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Jim Sheldon
 

Mind posting the amazon name for that one? No luck searching for it.

W0EB

On Sep 14, 2018, at 6:59 PM, ussv dharma via Groups.Io <ussvdharma=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Do a google search involving amazon, I did that and got the clamp for much less thant the $35.


If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!

MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
W7KFI & AFZ4SM


--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 9/14/18, Paul Smith <n0nbd@outlook.com> wrote:

Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 6:06 PM

Where does a guy look for one
de Paul N0NBD






Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

ussv dharma
 

Do a google search involving amazon, I did that and got the clamp for much less thant the $35.


If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!
 
MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
W7KFI  & AFZ4SM
 

--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 9/14/18, Paul Smith <n0nbd@outlook.com> wrote:

Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 6:06 PM

Where does a guy look for one
de Paul N0NBD


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Hello Mike 
That sounds like a excellent idea!
I think the group needs a new project to stir up some activity.

We possibly could set up a sub group 
To keep all of the info in one spot?

72
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 5:36 PM Mike Heitmann <n0so@...> wrote:
We could make a project out of building your own DMR “Hotspot”.

Some joker was supposed to present that topic at OzarKCon last year and “skipped out” at the last minute.

72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at 4:09 PM, Bob Zolecki via Groups.Io <bobzolecki@...> wrote:

Hi Charles

So is this my computer talking to your computer with no ham radio used at all or where do I go to find out how this works...

You got a 80 yr old ham here...I don't know about this new stuff...Is this a 4State project or not?

73 de Bob KR9Z


-----Original Message-----
From: Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp@...>
To: main <main@4SQRP.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Sep 14, 2018 3:06 pm
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR Talkgroup

Update: Application is made and approval is pending.  If we get this, we will have to USE it.  They make the initial assignment for 60 days, and they monitor usage.  If it is used a reasonable amount, then the assignment is made permanent.  I'm sure we can manage that!  Then if someone wants to link to a repeater or group of repeaters, we can further expand our footprint.

72,

Charles

--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Paul Smith
 

Tnx Bill

https://www.qsradio.com/shop-now.html#!/Claw%E2%84%A2-Mount/p/51822117/category=13543022

www.qsradio.com
We carry a wide selection of Amateur Radio accessories.&nbsp;


Sent from Outlook




From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> on behalf of dekle <dekle@...>
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 10:24 PM
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount
 

 
Bill
KV6Z
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 5:06 PM
Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Where does a guy look for one
de Paul N0NBD

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Mike Heitmann
 

We could make a project out of building your own DMR “Hotspot”.

Some joker was supposed to present that topic at OzarKCon last year and “skipped out” at the last minute.

72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at 4:09 PM, Bob Zolecki via Groups.Io <bobzolecki@...> wrote:

Hi Charles

So is this my computer talking to your computer with no ham radio used at all or where do I go to find out how this works...

You got a 80 yr old ham here...I don't know about this new stuff...Is this a 4State project or not?

73 de Bob KR9Z


-----Original Message-----
From: Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp@...>
To: main <main@4SQRP.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Sep 14, 2018 3:06 pm
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR Talkgroup

Update: Application is made and approval is pending.  If we get this, we will have to USE it.  They make the initial assignment for 60 days, and they monitor usage.  If it is used a reasonable amount, then the assignment is made permanent.  I'm sure we can manage that!  Then if someone wants to link to a repeater or group of repeaters, we can further expand our footprint.

72,

Charles


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Mike Heitmann
 

In the interim, the St Louis Metro Talk Group (TG 31292) is lightly used. I hang out there a lot.

72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at 2:06 PM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Update: Application is made and approval is pending. If we get this, we will have to USE it. They make the initial assignment for 60 days, and they monitor usage. If it is used a reasonable amount, then the assignment is made permanent. I'm sure we can manage that! Then if someone wants to link to a repeater or group of repeaters, we can further expand our footprint.

72,


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

dekle <dekle@...>
 


 
Bill
KV6Z
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Smith
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 5:06 PM
Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Where does a guy look for one
de Paul N0NBD

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Paul Smith
 

Hello Bob, I am waiting for my sons to tell me what I need to order to be able to do this hi hi

de paul N0NBD


Sent from Outlook




From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Zolecki via Groups.Io <bobzolecki@...>
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 9:09 PM
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR Talkgroup
 
Hi Charles

So is this my computer talking to your computer with no ham radio used at all or where do I go to find out how this works...

You got a 80 yr old ham here...I don't know about this new stuff...Is this a 4State project or not?

73 de Bob KR9Z


-----Original Message-----
From: Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp@...>
To: main <main@4SQRP.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Sep 14, 2018 3:06 pm
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR Talkgroup

Update: Application is made and approval is pending.  If we get this, we will have to USE it.  They make the initial assignment for 60 days, and they monitor usage.  If it is used a reasonable amount, then the assignment is made permanent.  I'm sure we can manage that!  Then if someone wants to link to a repeater or group of repeaters, we can further expand our footprint.

72,

Charles


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Paul Smith
 

I have been forwarding your posts to Les and Dwight. Les is supposed to subscribe here tonight
de Paul N0NBD


At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Paul Smith
 

Where does a guy look for one
de Paul N0NBD


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Bob Zolecki
 

Hi Charles

So is this my computer talking to your computer with no ham radio used at all or where do I go to find out how this works...

You got a 80 yr old ham here...I don't know about this new stuff...Is this a 4State project or not?

73 de Bob KR9Z


-----Original Message-----
From: Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp@...>
To: main <main@4SQRP.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Sep 14, 2018 3:06 pm
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR Talkgroup

Update: Application is made and approval is pending.  If we get this, we will have to USE it.  They make the initial assignment for 60 days, and they monitor usage.  If it is used a reasonable amount, then the assignment is made permanent.  I'm sure we can manage that!  Then if someone wants to link to a repeater or group of repeaters, we can further expand our footprint.

72,

Charles

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