Date   

Re: DMR information

Charles W. Powell
 

I wouldn’t say that it is like the CQ-100. While it is possible to operate strictly with a computer, it’s generally not done that way. Second, there are no charges other than equipment, and finally, I would think of it more like an enormous linked repeater than VOIP. My 2¢ anyway.

72,

Chas - NK8O

On Sep 14, 2018, at 10:57 PM, Dwayne R via Groups.Io <masterdr=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

In other words, this is like that CQ-100 VOIP stuff, is this correct?



--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 9/14/18, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: [4SQRP] DMR information
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 8:42 PM

It was brought to my attention that
perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i
will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and
what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio. Essentially it is a radio
that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech
for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it? Well, because it is
also includes a way of accessing other radios and users
world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios,
and allows a number of ways to gain access. DMR can
"talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area,
or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is
that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that
allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone
to access the network. In the case of the Four States
QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations
regardless of where each of us is located, formal or
informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who
is on the air with frequencies, times, etc. If our
Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or
all of these activities, plus any others that fall within
the realm of our amateur licenses. (Even if it's
not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it. On the
way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the
way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St.
Louis. There are folks who have more knowledge in
their pinky finger than I have in my entire head. I
have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door.
(Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).
I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk
Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would
otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside? Yes, sort of. The radios
are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and
figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you
want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also
generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.
It is a bit more complicated than just entering a
frequency and PL tone. It's more that you have a
target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code"
(roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your
radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and
finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are
going. I didn't think it was going to be nearly as
much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio??? Well, yes and no. It
does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol
using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end
than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio
is about communicating and DMR does a good job of
facilitating that. Think of it as having a
"local" repeater that any one of us can access at
any time, regardless of our physical location.
That's why there is some excitement over the
prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own
talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to
answer. I'm not an expert, but hey - that's
how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most
popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone
D868-uv. For hotspots, check out the
"OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"
I will stay away from others because I'm not as
familiar with them. Personally I have the Anytone and
Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the
whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or
so.






list misconfiguration

Greg Troxel
 

(sent to main-ownwer@, but that bounced)

From: "Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io" <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Subject: [4SQRP] DMR information
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 18:42:19 -0700 (12 hours, 2 minutes, 22 seconds ago)
Reply-To: main@4SQRP.groups.io

Two things:

- the From: addr above bounced when I tried to reply. I realize it's
trying to work around yahoo brokenness, but something isn't right.

- There's a reply-to header that does not give an address of the
poster, contrary to IETF standards. It results in replies that the
sender intended to be private going instead to the list. People
that haven't instructed their MUAs to ignore these could be upset or
embarrassed by this.


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Dan Reynolds
 

I posted a lot of information on the #SSB side. There is a lot of good information and there is a lot of misinformation and confusion. It's not hard and it's not expensive. I got into DMR for < $100. 

As to the comparisons to the other modes - well none of them compare pricewise and DMR is the fastest growing digital U/V mode. Maybe it's not pure radio - lots of Internet involved - but there is always some radio involved. I have no local DMR repeater so I use a chinese "hotspot" but I talk on a UHF radio to get to that hotspot. And on the other end it might be a repeater or a hotspot or even another digital mode. Doesn't matter. 

One of my first QSO's and my favorite so far: I was on my HT & hotspot and on the other end, Sweden, he was on his HT driving to work going through a repeater. I think it's cool. And as said it's something to do when the spots are low. I think this falls under the "advancing the radio art." And it's QRP to boot. I'd be happy to do a presentation at Ozarkcon. I'm NOT AN EXPERT but I waded through the mess to figure out how to make it work. And once you cut through all the bull out there you'll find it's a neat way to communicate. Nothing beats RF but this is a worthwhile diversion when when RF isn't working so well. Would be great when your trying to setup QSOs too.
IMHO


Re: DMR information

Greg Troxel
 

"Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io" <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io>
writes:

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so
programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that
will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also
generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a
bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's
more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color
code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio
knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a
frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think
it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.
Besides the radio being proprietary, the protocol is not open, and hams
may not build their own equipment. The protocol other than voice
encoding is openly documented. But, the codec used, AMBE2, is both
patented and secret (although there are rumors it has been reverse
engineered). Technically the codec is not part of the DMR spec, but
there was an agreement among manufacturers to use it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_mobile_radio

DSTAR is much the same, except that a proprietary codec is part of the
spec.

I am not aware of any published protocol specs for Yaesu's system.


Now, if we could use codec2 over DMR, that would be cool.



Someone mentioned brandmeister. As I understand it there are multiple
DMR networks that are partially but not entirely cooperating, and I
don't understand anything more than that. So I am guessing this
talkgroup would only be on brandmeister, and not on DMR-MARC?

73 de n1dam


Re: DMR information

Mike Heitmann
 

There are three popular Digital Voice modes on VHF/UHF right now: DMR, System Fusion,  and D-STAR.  All of them are very similar, and all of them are 100% incompatible with each other.

The advantages of DMR over D-STAR or Fusion are inexpensive Chinese DMR radios. If you have a DMR repeater that accesses one of the DMR networks in range, a $100 DMR HT will get you on the air with world wide talk capability. If you’re not in range of a repeater, adding a $100 Digital Voice “Hotspot” will do the same thing. 

$100 - $200 to get into DMR vs $500 or more for a D-STAR or Fusion Radio is a big plus. 

Personally, I’m a big fan of D-STAR, I think the protocol is a better design and it uses your callsign to “route” your signal through the network. Since DMR is a commercial product being used in the Ham world, you need a separate DMR ID number (note: you can apply for one here: https://www.radioid.net/cgi-bin/trbo-database/register.cgi

I’m probably the wrong guy to ask which is “better”. I admit I’m biased. I’ve been on D-STAR since about 2006(?), and I was very involved in the development of an EMCOMM program called D-RATS that allows data (messages, forms, files, etc) to be transferred over the air while continuing to use the same radio for voice communication and (if the D-STAR radios have GPS) position tracking. So naturally, I think D-STAR is a better protocol. 

But the availability of inexpensive radios and hotspots give DMR the advantage for now.

FYI: I’m listening to  DMR STL Metro (TG31292) and D-STAR Reflector REF038 C right now (yes, with a Digital Voice Hotspot, you can do both at the same time).

72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at 10:57 PM, Robin Kidd <w4ien@...> wrote:

How is DMR different from D-Star? Is it better? What advantage does it have over D-Star?


72/73,
Robin
W4IEN
EM73vx

On September 14, 2018 at 9:42 PM "Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io" <doctorcwp@...> wrote:

It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Gary E. Kohtala
 

That would be DRM, vice DMR. Two entirely different things.

Best regards,

Gary, K7EK

Sent from BlueMail

On Sep 15, 2018, at 01:26, "ussv dharma via Groups.Io" <yahoo.com@groups.io target=_blank>ussvdharma=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Aloha:  For years I thought DMR stood fo9r Digital Mondale Radio...providing FM type quality to shortwave transmissions.  and then So many countries started transmitting an hour or two a day of DMR....almost all of the major countries started transmitting with the exception of USA.

If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!
 
MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
W7KFI  & AFZ4SM
 



On Fri, 9/14/18, Mike Heitmann <n0so@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR Talkgroup
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 9:40 PM

Here is a
good intro from the Missouri Digital Group:http://www.modigitalgroup.org/images/Introduction_to_DMR-DCC_2017.pdf
72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at
7:59 PM, Wayne Dillon <wayne.dillon@...>
wrote:

Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup
101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it.
Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that
will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be
a burden but I really have no clue.
Be
blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP








Re: DMR Talkgroup

ussv dharma
 

Aloha: For years I thought DMR stood fo9r Digital Mondale Radio...providing FM type quality to shortwave transmissions. and then So many countries started transmitting an hour or two a day of DMR....almost all of the major countries started transmitting with the exception of USA.

If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!
 
MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
W7KFI  & AFZ4SM
 

--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 9/14/18, Mike Heitmann <n0so@att.net> wrote:

Subject: Re: [4SQRP] DMR Talkgroup
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 9:40 PM

Here is a
good intro from the Missouri Digital Group:http://www.modigitalgroup.org/images/Introduction_to_DMR-DCC_2017.pdf
72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at
7:59 PM, Wayne Dillon <wayne.dillon@gmail.com>
wrote:

Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup
101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it.
Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that
will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be
a burden but I really have no clue.
Be
blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP


Re: DMR information

Gary E. Kohtala
 

I am well established on DMR with handhelds and mobile rigs. I like the idea of a talkgroup for us to coordinate and discuss QRP in general. What talk group are you anticipating for this purpose? Preferably one of the quieter less used ones. Thanks.

Best regards,

Gary, K7EK

Sent from BlueMail

On Sep 14, 2018, at 22:49, Paul Smith <n0nbd@...> wrote:

Cool BEANS! Chas! tnx

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> on behalf of Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp@...>
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 8:42:19 PM
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Subject: [4SQRP] DMR information
 
It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


Re: DMR information

Robin Kidd <w4ien@...>
 

How is DMR different from D-Star? Is it better? What advantage does it have over D-Star?


72/73,
Robin
W4IEN
EM73vx

On September 14, 2018 at 9:42 PM "Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io" <doctorcwp@...> wrote:

It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


Re: DMR information

Robin Kidd <w4ien@...>
 

How is DMR different than D-Star? Is it better, the same? Is there an advantage over D-Star?


72/73,
Robin
W4IEN
EM73vx

On September 14, 2018 at 9:42 PM "Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io" <doctorcwp@...> wrote:

It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


Re: DMR information

Dwayne R <masterdr@...>
 

In other words, this is like that CQ-100 VOIP stuff, is this correct?



--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 9/14/18, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: [4SQRP] DMR information
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 8:42 PM

It was brought to my attention that
perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i
will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and
what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio
that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech
for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is
also includes a way of accessing other radios and users
world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios,
and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can
"talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area,
or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is
that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that
allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone
to access the network.  In the case of the Four States
QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations
regardless of where each of us is located, formal or
informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who
is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our
Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or
all of these activities, plus any others that fall within
the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's
not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the
way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the
way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St.
Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in
their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I
have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door.
(Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).
 I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk
Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would
otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios
are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and
figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you
want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also
generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.
 It is a bit more complicated than just entering a
frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a
target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code"
(roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your
radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and
finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are
going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as
much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It
does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol
using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end
than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio
is about communicating and DMR does a good job of
facilitating that.  Think of it as having a
"local" repeater that any one of us can access at
any time, regardless of our physical location.
 That's why there is some excitement over the
prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own
talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to
answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's
how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most
popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone
D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the
"OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"
 I will stay away from others because I'm not as
familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and
Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the
whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or
so.


Re: DMR information

Paul Smith
 

Cool BEANS! Chas! tnx

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> on behalf of Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp@...>
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 8:42:19 PM
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Subject: [4SQRP] DMR information
 
It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


DMR information

Charles W. Powell
 

It was brought to my attention that perhaps everyone on the list is not familiar with DMR, so i will do my best to give an explanation of what it is and what it does.

DMR = Digital Mobile Radio.   Essentially it is a radio that uses a digital voice encoding to optimize human speech for radio transmission.

So why would we want to use it?  Well, because it is also includes a way of accessing other radios and users world-wide through the internet, using inexpensive radios, and allows a number of ways to gain access.  DMR can "talk" or work through DMR repeaters in your area, or radio-to-radio, but the really exciting part of it is that there are now inexpensive "hotspots" that allow you use your home internet connection or mobile phone to access the network.  In the case of the Four States QRP group, it would allow us to have ad-hoc conversations regardless of where each of us is located, formal or informal nets, or even "spotting" nets to see who is on the air with frequencies, times, etc.  If our Talk Group is approved, we will have a platform for any or all of these activities, plus any others that fall within the realm of our amateur licenses.  (Even if it's not, there are other places we could congregate on DMR.)

I was skeptical about DMR until I got into it.  On the way to Dayton (Xenia) this year, I talked to hams along the way and even arranged to have lunch with a fellow ham in St. Louis.  There are folks who have more knowledge in their pinky finger than I have in my entire head.  I have spoken with Eric, 4Z1UG, as though he were next door. (Some of you might listen to his podcast, QSO Today).  I have done a lot of listening on the Baynet Talk Group, and picked up a lot of information that I would otherwise have had to spend hours researching.

Is there a downside?  Yes, sort of.  The radios are proprietary, so programming requires some planning and figuring out a "code plug" that will do what you want it to do and go where you want it to go. It also generally requires a computer and a cable for programming.  It is a bit more complicated than just entering a frequency and PL tone.  It's more that you have a target (Talk Group, or Individual), a "color code" (roughly equivalent to a PL tone), a time slot, so your radio knows which half of the conversation(s) it wants, and finally a frequency that allows you to get where you are going.  I didn't think it was going to be nearly as much fun though as I found it to be.

Is DMR Amateur Radio???  Well, yes and no.  It does involve RF, but it is also a voice-over-IP protocol using the Internet. I think of it more as a means to an end than "real radio." But in the end, Amateur Radio is about communicating and DMR does a good job of facilitating that.  Think of it as having a "local" repeater that any one of us can access at any time, regardless of our physical location.  That's why there is some excitement over the prospect of involving the Four States QRP folks in our own talk group.

If anyone has any questions, ask me and I will do my best to answer.  I'm not an expert, but hey - that's how we learn.

72,

Chas - NK8O

P.S. If you want to investigate prices, look at the most popular radios, such as the TYT MD-380 and the Anytone D868-uv.  For hotspots, check out the "OpenSpot" and look on HRO for "Zumspot"  I will stay away from others because I'm not as familiar with them.  Personally I have the Anytone and Zumspot. The Zumspot is based on a Raspberry Pi Zero, so the whole thing is about 1" x 1.5" x 2.75" or so. 


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Mike Heitmann
 

Here is a good intro from the Missouri Digital Group:

72 de Mike, N0SO

On Sep 14, 2018, at 7:59 PM, Wayne Dillon <wayne.dillon@...> wrote:

Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup 101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it. Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be a burden but I really have no clue.
Be blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Paul
The antenna he was using was a tekecopic antenna from MFJ,
I think?
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 7:24 PM Jim Sheldon <w0eb@...> wrote:
Mind posting the amazon name for that one?  No luck searching for it.

W0EB

> On Sep 14, 2018, at 6:59 PM, ussv dharma via Groups.Io <ussvdharma=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Do a google search involving amazon, I did that and got the clamp for much less thant the $35.
>
>
> If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!
>
> MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
> W7KFI  & AFZ4SM
>
>
> --------------------------------------------
> On Fri, 9/14/18, Paul Smith <n0nbd@...> wrote:
>
> Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount
> To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
> Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 6:06 PM
>
> Where does a guy look for one
> de Paul N0NBD
>
>
>
>
>
>




--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Ge Wayne
Chas NK8O is working up a explanation for the group.
This was discussed at Ozarkcon, and it sounded like a possible way for the group to communicate during low cycle times.

For now just google DMR open source radio, and best of all it’s still Qrp !

72
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 7:59 PM Wayne Dillon <wayne.dillon@...> wrote:
Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup 101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it. Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be a burden but I really have no clue.
Be blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP

--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Charles W. Powell
 


Re: DMR Talkgroup

Wayne Dillon
 

Can someone please write a simple DMR Talkgroup 101, I have no idea how this works or what I need to do it. Now located in Kalispell, NW Montana it is something that will keep me in touch with the rest of the gang. Sorry to be a burden but I really have no clue.
Be blessed all
Wayne - NQ0RP


Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

Jim Sheldon
 

Mind posting the amazon name for that one? No luck searching for it.

W0EB

On Sep 14, 2018, at 6:59 PM, ussv dharma via Groups.Io <ussvdharma=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Do a google search involving amazon, I did that and got the clamp for much less thant the $35.


If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!

MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
W7KFI & AFZ4SM


--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 9/14/18, Paul Smith <n0nbd@outlook.com> wrote:

Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 6:06 PM

Where does a guy look for one
de Paul N0NBD






Re: At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount

ussv dharma
 

Do a google search involving amazon, I did that and got the clamp for much less thant the $35.


If you don't change direction you WILL arrive exactly where you're headed!!
 
MSGT. Susan Meckley, USA (Ret.)
W7KFI  & AFZ4SM
 

--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 9/14/18, Paul Smith <n0nbd@outlook.com> wrote:

Subject: [4SQRP] At Brutus NK8O was using a clamp antenna mount
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018, 6:06 PM

Where does a guy look for one
de Paul N0NBD

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