Date   

Re: MORSE HAS FEW HETERONYMS

w2sh@...
 

Language is living and in constant change, but at a fairly leisurely rate.  As has been noted, "tks" is biting away at "tnx", and it's just a whisker shorter to send.  "Name" is often upstaged by a slightly quicker-to-send "op".  I don't use the latter because it  would reveal me as being an "olde pharte"; guess what?  I am!  I rigorously avoid "cul" because in my natal language it refers to an intimate body part.

72,

Charles, W2SH



To: 4sqrp@...
CC: aldenmcduffie@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Mon, 12 May 2014 11:27:52 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] MORSE HAS FEW HETERONYMS

 

Hey 4SQRPers, 05/12/14

 

Yup, the English Language - most languages for that matter - is full of inconsistencies.

These likely come for new words arriving from a village nearby that have a different

meaning but the same sound. Do this for hundreds of years and you get an increasing number of quasi-redundancies.

 

HOWEVER, Morse Code, is a new language time wise thanks to Mr Morse who coined it in 1836 or

there abouts.  That's like yesterday compared to say Latin or Greek.

 

I've begun studying Morse as a language and hope to summarize my findings for the Banner

sometime later in the year or next year. One of the interesting things I've found is that a majority

of words used in a casual QSO, such as TNX, FB, etc, are made up by hams. And the language

continues to evolve. An example of that is the arrival of the word "TU" for "thank you."

 

I've been keeping a copy of some of my rag chew QSOs and counting the frequency of use of

each of the words. The leading words so far are: ES, FB, 73, FER, IS, and TNX. I don't have enough

QSO samples yet to get a good ranking.

 

Of course contest words are different, the top rank is obvious, "5NN." I'm not collecting those

QSOs since that activity is pretty much call sign copying, i.e 700,000 call signs in the USA alone.

 

What is apparent so far is that comprehension for languages, including Morse Code, increases when enough words
are tied together for a thought. If a verb is included this aids the reader/listener to better comprehend of thought/sentence sent.
For example, when QTH is sent, you expect to get back a state abbreviation next rather than 5NN or something else.
Where is the verb? It is embedded in the QTH but we intuitively understant that. "My location IS...." Content matters in understanding.

 

Where I'm going with this is the idea that practicing Morse Code with short familiar messages should

increase one's ability to copy the QSO. And the rate needs to be high enough to begin to hear the words

and not the individual dits and dahs. Twenty WPM would be a minimum.

 

More later! Ain't ham radio fun! Uncle Phil, W0XI

 


Re: MORSE HAS FEW HETERONYMS

Chuck Carpenter
 

Phil.

I net that I check in to includes the weather, WX, CLDY, T STMS, LT WND< WNDY, OVRCST, CLR

Then, YL, XYL, WF, OM

And lots more CW abbreviations in the ARRL Operating Manual Seventh Edition, HAM DESKTOP REFERENCE pg 21
and probably other version of the manual. This is just the one I have on hand.

Including some of above, a lot of them used for message handling and etc.

Chuck Carpenter, W5USJ
EM22cv, Rains Co. TX


Re: MORSE HAS FEW HETERONYMS

Charlie Vest
 

I remember having a card on our high school station desk (WA0MHH) written by our "Elmer" (W0PSE) SK for an example for the new hams, since I was an old timer by then since I was licensed at 12:) Never owned a mic as far as I know and always wore a red suit jacket to hamfests and carried his mill to the CW competition at them. Didn't even take it out of the bag until 25 WPM and then would do a little "warm up" starting about 35, before the competition really started.

It had something like  GM or GE  OM and tnx for the call, can't remember if we used UR or not that was 50 years ago :). Can't remember all of the rest of it, but it described our dipole fed with 450 ohm parallel line and that CADLLAC station to even an old timer like me :) Heath DX-60 crystal control,CAUTION NO MORE THAN 75 WATTS INPUT !!, HRO-5 receiver and roughly 100 J-38's, and matching headphones wired to a patch panel in the back corner of the room.

Also as kind of a side note, since Thomas Edison was nearly deaf, and many books say he and his lady friend carried a coin in their pockets so they could "communicate, in private" when next to each other. I have read that he proposed to her using just that method. ( I have read every book on Edison since I was old enough to read and comprehend, so I am sure some of it could have taken on some "literary license", however I have read about the coin and marriage incident more than once.)

Looking forward to your most interesting article.

Charlie, W5COV


On 5/12/2014 11:27 AM, Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@... [4sqrp] wrote:
 

Hey 4SQRPers, 05/12/14

 

Yup, the English Language - most languages for that matter - is full of inconsistencies.

These likely come for new words arriving from a village nearby that have a different

meaning but the same sound. Do this for hundreds of years and you get an increasing number of quasi-redundancies.

 

HOWEVER, Morse Code, is a new language time wise thanks to Mr Morse who coined it in 1836 or

there abouts.  That's like yesterday compared to say Latin or Greek.

 

I've begun studying Morse as a language and hope to summarize my findings for the Banner

sometime later in the year or next year. One of the interesting things I've found is that a majority

of words used in a casual QSO, such as TNX, FB, etc, are made up by hams. And the language

continues to evolve. An example of that is the arrival of the word "TU" for "thank you."

 

I've been keeping a copy of some of my rag chew QSOs and counting the frequency of use of

each of the words. The leading words so far are: ES, FB, 73, FER, IS, and TNX. I don't have enough

QSO samples yet to get a good ranking.

 

Of course contest words are different, the top rank is obvious, "5NN." I'm not collecting those

QSOs since that activity is pretty much call sign copying, i.e 700,000 call signs in the USA alone.

 

What is apparent so far is that comprehension for languages, including Morse Code, increases when enough words
are tied together for a thought. If a verb is included this aids the reader/listener to better comprehend of thought/sentence sent.
For example, when QTH is sent, you expect to get back a state abbreviation next rather than 5NN or something else.
Where is the verb? It is embedded in the QTH but we intuitively understant that. "My location IS...." Content matters in understanding.

 

Where I'm going with this is the idea that practicing Morse Code with short familiar messages should

increase one's ability to copy the QSO. And the rate needs to be high enough to begin to hear the words

and not the individual dits and dahs. Twenty WPM would be a minimum.

 

More later! Ain't ham radio fun! Uncle Phil, W0XI

 




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Re: MORSE HAS FEW HETERONYMS

dekle <dekle@...>
 

Hi Phil,
 
I'm glad to hear that you're going to write about this subject.
I've noticed a few changes since I've come back to ham radio.
For example, the use of "TKS" instead of "TNX" just gets under my skin. But I do like the new "TU".
Also, if I send "HI", am I laughing or saying hello? Usually, in context, it's not a problem. And on it goes.......
 
Bill
KV6Z
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 12, 2014 11:27 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] MORSE HAS FEW HETERONYMS

 

Hey 4SQRPers, 05/12/14

Yup, the English Language - most languages for that matter - is full of inconsistencies.

These likely come for new words arriving from a village nearby that have a different

meaning but the same sound. Do this for hundreds of years and you get an increasing number of quasi-redundancies.

HOWEVER, Morse Code, is a new language time wise thanks to Mr Morse who coined it in 1836 or

there abouts.  That's like yesterday compared to say Latin or Greek.

I've begun studying Morse as a language and hope to summarize my findings for the Banner

sometime later in the year or next year. One of the interesting things I've found is that a majority

of words used in a casual QSO, such as TNX, FB, etc, are made up by hams. And the language

continues to evolve. An example of that is the arrival of the word "TU" for "thank you."

I've been keeping a copy of some of my rag chew QSOs and counting the frequency of use of

each of the words. The leading words so far are: ES, FB, 73, FER, IS, and TNX. I don't have enough

QSO samples yet to get a good ranking.

Of course contest words are different, the top rank is obvious, "5NN." I'm not collecting those

QSOs since that activity is pretty much call sign copying, i.e 700,000 call signs in the USA alone.

What is apparent so far is that comprehension for languages, including Morse Code, increases when enough words
are tied together for a thought. If a verb is included this aids the reader/listener to better comprehend of thought/sentence sent.
For example, when QTH is sent, you expect to get back a state abbreviation next rather than 5NN or something else.
Where is the verb? It is embedded in the QTH but we intuitively understant that. "My location IS...." Content matters in understanding.

Where I'm going with this is the idea that practicing Morse Code with short familiar messages should

increase one's ability to copy the QSO. And the rate needs to be high enough to begin to hear the words

and not the individual dits and dahs. Twenty WPM would be a minimum.

More later! Ain't ham radio fun! Uncle Phil, W0XI

 


Re: Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

Rick Bennett
 

The key to operating your morse key is to lean the lean part of your hand on the table just right, put your dashes on the right and your dots on the left and make sure no character is left out, otherwise other hams may think poorly of your character.

 

de KC0PET, Rick


From: "Bill Cromwell wrcromwell@... [4sqrp]" <4sqrp@...>
To: 4sqrp@...
Sent: Sunday, May 11, 2014 7:36:12 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

 

On 05/11/2014 05:36 PM, 'dekle' dekle@... [4sqrp] wrote:
>
> 
>
> "If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of
> them, what do you call it?"
>
Um....

The end.



Re: Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

Phil Anderson
 

Hey 4SQRPers, 05/12/14

Yup, the English Language - most languages for that matter - is full of inconsistencies.
These likely come for new words arriving from a village nearby that have a different
meaning but the same sound. Take the folks in Jersey; they sound different.
Do this for hundreds of years and you get an increasing number of quasi-redundancies.

HOWEVER, Morse Code, is a new language time wise thanks to Mr Morse who coined it in 1836 or
there abouts.  That's like yesterday compared to say Latin or Greek.

I've begun studying Morse as a language and hope to summarize my findings for the Banner
sometime later in the year or next year. One of the interesting things I've found is that a majority
of words used in a casual QSO, such as TNX, FB, ord QSB, are made up by hams. And the language
continues to evolve. An examp le of that is the arrival of the word "TU" for "thank you."

I've been keeping a copy of some of my rag chew QSOs and counting the frequency of use of
each of the words. The leading words so far are: ES, FB, 73, FER, IS, and TNX. I don't have enough
QSO samples yet to get a good ranking.

Of course contest words are different, the top rank is obvious, "5NN." I'm not collecting those
since that activity is pretty much call sign copying, i.e 700,000 call signs in the us alone.

What is apparent is that comprehension for languages, including Morse Code, increases when enough words
are tied together for a thought. If a verb is included this aid the reader/listener to better comprehend
said message. For example, when QTH is sent, you expect to get back a state abbreviation next rather
than 5NN or something else.

Where I'm going with this is the idea that practicing Morse Code with short familar messages should
incre ase one's ability to copy Morse. And the rate needs to be high enough to begin to hear the words
and not the individual dits and dahs.

More later! Ain't ham radio fun! Uncle Phil, W0XI


MORSE HAS FEW HETERONYMS

Phil Anderson
 

Hey 4SQRPers, 05/12/14

 

Yup, the English Language - most languages for that matter - is full of inconsistencies.

These likely come for new words arriving from a village nearby that have a different

meaning but the same sound. Do this for hundreds of years and you get an increasing number of quasi-redundancies.

 

HOWEVER, Morse Code, is a new language time wise thanks to Mr Morse who coined it in 1836 or

there abouts.  That's like yesterday compared to say Latin or Greek.

 

I've begun studying Morse as a language and hope to summarize my findings for the Banner

sometime later in the year or next year. One of the interesting things I've found is that a majority

of words used in a casual QSO, such as TNX, FB, etc, are made up by hams. And the language

continues to evolve. An example of that is the arrival of the word "TU" for "thank you."

 

I've been keeping a copy of some of my rag chew QSOs and counting the frequency of use of

each of the words. The leading words so far are: ES, FB, 73, FER, IS, and TNX. I don't have enough

QSO samples yet to get a good ranking.

 

Of course contest words are different, the top rank is obvious, "5NN." I'm not collecting those

QSOs since that activity is pretty much call sign copying, i.e 700,000 call signs in the USA alone.

 

What is apparent so far is that comprehension for languages, including Morse Code, increases when enough words
are tied together for a thought. If a verb is included this aids the reader/listener to better comprehend of thought/sentence sent.
For example, when QTH is sent, you expect to get back a state abbreviation next rather than 5NN or something else.
Where is the verb? It is embedded in the QTH but we intuitively understant that. "My location IS...." Content matters in understanding.

 

Where I'm going with this is the idea that practicing Morse Code with short familiar messages should

increase one's ability to copy the QSO. And the rate needs to be high enough to begin to hear the words

and not the individual dits and dahs. Twenty WPM would be a minimum.

 

More later! Ain't ham radio fun! Uncle Phil, W0XI

 


Re: Gud Morning oh - oh

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Brrrrr!
Gm Dale
Well after a beautiful 80 degree Mothers Day, we had a couple rounds of thunderstorms last night. No damage this time!
The cool front that caused the storms is dropping our temp into the 60's, but thank goodness, no snow!
Hope your animals and garden survives!
72
Johnny AC0BQ

On Monday, May 12, 2014, Dale Putnam daleputnam@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

This morning.. the light gently brightenin, but with a solid overcast, no shadows... 
and that is ok.. the drifts are easier to see.... drifts... in Middle of May..   you know..
those piles of snow... stacked up by 30 mph winds... and a snowfall of 8 - 10 inches.
But that's ok.. the snow covers the sprouts in the garden... wrapping them in that cozy 
white blanket of snow and ice, to comfort them from the 26F.....

I'm not wishing this on anyone, but it isn't tied down here... my ropes won't hold it. 
and my ropin horse isn't anywhere at all interested in sittin down with it tied on.

Y'all take care, and be careful, twisty winds, sparks in the sky, water falls, all things to be aware of.

God Bless us everyone, 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



--
QRP....."more smiles per watt"
72
JOHNNY AC0BQ  ..


Gud Morning oh - oh

Dale Putnam
 

This morning.. the light gently brightenin, but with a solid overcast, no shadows... 
and that is ok.. the drifts are easier to see.... drifts... in Middle of May..   you know..
those piles of snow... stacked up by 30 mph winds... and a snowfall of 8 - 10 inches.
But that's ok.. the snow covers the sprouts in the garden... wrapping them in that cozy 
white blanket of snow and ice, to comfort them from the 26F.....

I'm not wishing this on anyone, but it isn't tied down here... my ropes won't hold it. 
and my ropin horse isn't anywhere at all interested in sittin down with it tied on.

Y'all take care, and be careful, twisty winds, sparks in the sky, water falls, all things to be aware of.

God Bless us everyone, 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 


Send in your score

John Lonigro
 

It's Monday. If you didn't participate in the SSS last night, your next chance won't be until June.

If you DID participate in the SSS last night, don't forget to send in your results so I can tally them. You've got until midnight tomorrow (Tuesday) night to get them in. This is your only reminder to send in your score. Send an email with your results to:

SecondSundaySprint@...

Put "Sprint" in the subject line.

Don't "reply" with your results. This is my everyday email. I have a special one set up for sprints. Results should be posted around Wednesday.

Thanks and 72,

John, AA0VE
SSS Coordinator


Re: Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

Bill Cromwell
 

On 05/11/2014 05:36 PM, 'dekle' dekle@... [4sqrp] wrote:



"If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?"
Um....


The end.


Re: Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

Bill Cromwell
 

On 05/11/2014 04:41 PM, 'Jim's Desktop' w0eb@... [4sqrp] wrote:

**

---much snipping---

Now it's _UP _to you what you do with this email.
I'm sending a copy to a friend of mine who lives in the UP. The UP is that part of Michigan north of the Straight of Mackinac between Lakes Michigan and Superior. Aka the Yooper.

73,

Bill KU8H

Michigan QRP Club M-1778

4SQRP 555


Re: Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

Charlie Vest
 

I once worked for a company, that had telephone stations in the noisy areas of the plant. The product had a very clever name, HEAR HERE .

Charlie, W5COV

On 5/11/2014 4:27 PM, David Martin davemrtn@... [4sqrp] wrote:

Isn't the english language fun !!!

While in California once (in the Hollywood area) I was entertained by watching an oriental and an Italian try to communicate using broken english....

Hey, I noticed the reminder at the bottom of your posting and I feel it necessary to say the next OzarkCon will be coming /_*UP*_/ on April 10-11, 2015.


On 05/11/2014 03:41 PM, 'Jim's Desktop' w0eb@... [4sqrp] wrote:

*I wish to add another hemograph to this. “_THEY’RE_ taking a package to _THEIR_ car over _THERE_”. It is apparent from the ignorant writing I read on the computer that schools no longer teach children the meanings of those three words. Lee
*

--

*Heteronyms... this is brilliant*

*Hemographs are words of like spelling but with more
than one meaning.*

*A homograph that is also pronounced differently is a
heteronym.*

**

*
*

1) The bandage was *_wound _*around the *_wound._*

2) The farm was used to *_produce produce_*.

3) The dump was so full that it had to *_refuse _*more
*_refuse_*.

4) We must *_polish _*the *_Polish _*furniture..

5) He could *_lead _*if he would get the *_lead _*out.

6) The soldier decided to *_desert _*his dessert in the
*_desert.._*

7) Since there is no time like the *_present_*, he
thought it was time to *_present _*the *_present_.*

8) A *_bass _*was painted on the head of the *_bass _*drum.

9) When shot at, the *_dove dove _*into the bushes.

10) I did not *_object _*to the *_object._*

11) The insurance was *_invalid _*for the *_invalid._*

12) There was a *_row _*among the oarsmen about how to
*_row_*.

13) They were too *_close _*to the door to *_close _*it.

14) The buck *_does _*funny things when the *_does _*are
present.

15) A seamstress and a *_sewer _*fell down into a
*_sewer _*line.

16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his *_sow
_*to *_sow._*

17) The *_wind _*was too strong for me to *_wind _*the sail.

18) Upon seeing the *_tear _*in the painting I shed a
*_tear.._*

19) I had to *_subject _*the *_subject _*to a series of
tests.

20) How can I *_intimate _*this to my most *_intimate
_*friend?

Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no
egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor
pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in
England or French fries in France . Sweetmeats are
candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat.
We take English for granted. But if we explore its
paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly,
boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from
Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing,
grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural
of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth, beeth?
One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2
indices? Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends
but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends
and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a
vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian
eat? Sometimes I think all the English speakers should
be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In
what language do people recite at a play and play at a
recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have
noses that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites? You have
to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which
your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you
fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm
goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it
reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of
course, is not a race at all. That is why, when the
stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are
out, they are invisible.

PS. - Why doesn't 'Buick' rhyme with 'quick'?

*You lovers of the English language might enjoy this.*

*There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more
meanings than any other two-letter word, and that is
*_'UP.'_

*It's easy to understand *_UP_, meaning toward the sky
or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the
morning, why do we wake _UP_?

At a meeting, why does a topic come _UP_?

Why do we speak _UP _and why are the officers _UP _for
election and why is it _UP _to the secretary to write_UP
_a report?

We call _UP _our friends.

And we use it to brighten _UP _a room, polish _UP _the
silver; we warm _UP _the leftovers and clean _UP _the
kitchen.

We lock _UP _the house and some guys fix _UP _the old car.

At other times the little word has real special meaning.

People stir _UP _trouble, line _UP _for tickets, work
_UP _an appetite, and think _UP_excuses.

To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed _UP_is
special.

A drain must be opened _UP _because it is stopped _UP_.

We open _UP _a store in the morning but we close it _UP
_at night.

*We seem to be pretty mixed *_UP _*about *_UP_!

To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of _UP_, look
the word _UP _in the dictionary.

In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes _UP _almost 1/4th
of the page and can add _UP _to about thirty definitions.

If you are _UP _to it, you might try building _UP _a
list of the many ways _UP _is used.

It will take _UP _a lot of your time, but if you don't
give _UP_, you may wind _UP _with a hundred or more.

When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding _UP_.

When the sun comes out we say it is clearing _UP_.

*When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes
things *_UP_.

*When it doesn't rain for awhile, things dry *_UP_.

*One could go on and on, but I'll wrap it *_UP_,

for now my time is _UP_,

so.......it is time to shut _UP_!

Now it's _UP _to you what you do with this email.

--
*David Martin - K5DCM ---o0o---
Mountain Home, Arkansas*
Guns don't kill people, any more than spoons & forks cause obesity.



---
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Re: Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

dekle <dekle@...>
 


 "If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?"
 
 
A Rockmite.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 11, 2014 3:41 PM
Subject: [4sqrp] Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

 

 
 
 
I wish to add another hemograph to this.  “THEY’RE  taking a package to  THEIR  car over  THERE”.  It is apparent from the ignorant writing I read on the computer that schools no longer teach children the meanings of those three words.  Lee

--

Heteronyms... this is brilliant

 Hemographs are words of like spelling but with more than one meaning.

A homograph that is also pronounced differently is a heteronym.

 


1) The bandage was wound around the wound.

2) The farm was used to produce produce.

3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.

4) We must polish the Polish furniture..

5) He could lead if he would get the lead out.

6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert..

7) Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.

8) A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.

9) When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

10) I did not object to the object.

11) The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

12) There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.

13) They were too close to the door to close it.

14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.

15) A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.

16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.

17) The wind was too strong for me to wind the sail.

18) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear..

19) I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

20) How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?

Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France . Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth, beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices? Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and play at a recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have noses that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites? You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all. That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible.

PS. - Why doesn't 'Buick' rhyme with 'quick'?

You lovers of the English language might enjoy this.

There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that is 'UP.'

It's easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP?

At a meeting, why does a topic come UP?

Why do we speak UP and why are the officers UP for election and why is it UP to the secretary to write UP a report?

We call UP our friends.

And we use it to brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver; we warm UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen.

We lock UP the house and some guys fix UP the old car.

At other times the little word has real special meaning.

People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UP excuses.

To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed UP is special.

A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP.

We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night.

We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP!

To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look the word UP in the dictionary.

In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4th of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions.

If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used.

It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don't give UP, you may wind UP with a hundred or more.

When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP.

When the sun comes out we say it is clearing UP.

When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes things UP.

When it doesn't rain for awhile, things dry UP.

One could go on and on, but I'll wrap it UP,

for now my time is UP,

so.......it is time to shut UP!

Now it's UP to you what you do with this email.



Re: Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

davemrtn
 

Isn't the english language fun !!!

While in California once (in the Hollywood area) I was entertained by watching an oriental and an Italian try to communicate using broken english....

Hey, I noticed the reminder at the bottom of your posting and I feel it necessary to say the next OzarkCon will be coming /_*UP*_/ on April 10-11, 2015.

On 05/11/2014 03:41 PM, 'Jim's Desktop' w0eb@... [4sqrp] wrote:

*I wish to add another hemograph to this. “_THEY’RE_ taking a package to _THEIR_ car over _THERE_”. It is apparent from the ignorant writing I read on the computer that schools no longer teach children the meanings of those three words. Lee
*

--

*Heteronyms... this is brilliant*

*Hemographs are words of like spelling but with more than
one meaning.*

*A homograph that is also pronounced differently is a
heteronym.*

**

*
*

1) The bandage was *_wound _*around the *_wound._*

2) The farm was used to *_produce produce_*.

3) The dump was so full that it had to *_refuse _*more
*_refuse_*.

4) We must *_polish _*the *_Polish _*furniture..

5) He could *_lead _*if he would get the *_lead _*out.

6) The soldier decided to *_desert _*his dessert in the
*_desert.._*

7) Since there is no time like the *_present_*, he
thought it was time to *_present _*the *_present_.*

8) A *_bass _*was painted on the head of the *_bass _*drum.

9) When shot at, the *_dove dove _*into the bushes.

10) I did not *_object _*to the *_object._*

11) The insurance was *_invalid _*for the *_invalid._*

12) There was a *_row _*among the oarsmen about how to
*_row_*.

13) They were too *_close _*to the door to *_close _*it.

14) The buck *_does _*funny things when the *_does _*are
present.

15) A seamstress and a *_sewer _*fell down into a *_sewer
_*line.

16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his *_sow
_*to *_sow._*

17) The *_wind _*was too strong for me to *_wind _*the sail.

18) Upon seeing the *_tear _*in the painting I shed a
*_tear.._*

19) I had to *_subject _*the *_subject _*to a series of
tests.

20) How can I *_intimate _*this to my most *_intimate
_*friend?

Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no
egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor
pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in
England or French fries in France . Sweetmeats are
candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat.
We take English for granted. But if we explore its
paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing
rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea
nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing,
grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural
of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth, beeth?
One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2
indices? Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends
but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends
and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a
vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?
Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be
committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what
language do people recite at a play and play at a
recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have noses
that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while
a wise man and a wise guy are opposites? You have to
marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your
house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in
a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off
by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it
reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of
course, is not a race at all. That is why, when the stars
are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out,
they are invisible.

PS. - Why doesn't 'Buick' rhyme with 'quick'?

*You lovers of the English language might enjoy this.*

*There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more
meanings than any other two-letter word, and that is *_'UP.'_

*It's easy to understand *_UP_, meaning toward the sky or
at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the
morning, why do we wake _UP_?

At a meeting, why does a topic come _UP_?

Why do we speak _UP _and why are the officers _UP _for
election and why is it _UP _to the secretary to write_UP
_a report?

We call _UP _our friends.

And we use it to brighten _UP _a room, polish _UP _the
silver; we warm _UP _the leftovers and clean _UP _the
kitchen.

We lock _UP _the house and some guys fix _UP _the old car.

At other times the little word has real special meaning.

People stir _UP _trouble, line _UP _for tickets, work _UP
_an appetite, and think _UP_excuses.

To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed _UP_is special.

A drain must be opened _UP _because it is stopped _UP_.

We open _UP _a store in the morning but we close it _UP
_at night.

*We seem to be pretty mixed *_UP _*about *_UP_!

To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of _UP_, look
the word _UP _in the dictionary.

In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes _UP _almost 1/4th of
the page and can add _UP _to about thirty definitions.

If you are _UP _to it, you might try building _UP _a list
of the many ways _UP _is used.

It will take _UP _a lot of your time, but if you don't
give _UP_, you may wind _UP _with a hundred or more.

When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding _UP_.

When the sun comes out we say it is clearing _UP_.

*When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes things
*_UP_.

*When it doesn't rain for awhile, things dry *_UP_.

*One could go on and on, but I'll wrap it *_UP_,

for now my time is _UP_,

so.......it is time to shut _UP_!

Now it's _UP _to you what you do with this email.
--
*David Martin - K5DCM ---o0o---
Mountain Home, Arkansas*
Guns don't kill people, any more than spoons & forks cause obesity.


Fw[2]: Heteronyms... this is brilliant

Jim Sheldon
 

I wish to add another hemograph to this. “THEY’RE taking a package to
THEIR car over THERE”. It is apparent from the ignorant writing I
read on the computer that schools no longer teach children the meanings
of those three words. Lee

--

Heteronyms... this is brilliant

Hemographs are words of like spelling but with more than one
meaning.

A homograph that is also pronounced differently is a heteronym.





1) The bandage was wound around the wound.



2) The farm was used to produce produce.



3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.



4) We must polish the Polish furniture..



5) He could lead if he would get the lead out.



6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert..



7) Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time
to present the present.



8) A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.



9) When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.



10) I did not object to the object.



11) The insurance was invalid for the invalid.



12) There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.



13) They were too close to the door to close it.



14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.



15) A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.



16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.



17) The wind was too strong for me to wind the sail.



18) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear..



19) I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.



20) How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?





Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no egg in
eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in
France . Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't
sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its
paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are
square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.



And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers
don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth,
why isn't the plural of booth, beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one
moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices? Doesn't it seem crazy that you
can make amends but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and
ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?



If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian
eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? Sometimes I think all
the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the
verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and
play at a recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have noses
that run and feet that smell?



How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man
and a wise guy are opposites? You have to marvel at the unique
lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns
down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an
alarm goes off by going on.



English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the
creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at
all. That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when
the lights are out, they are invisible.



PS. - Why doesn't 'Buick' rhyme with 'quick'?





You lovers of the English language might enjoy this.



There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any
other two-letter word, and that is 'UP.'



It's easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of
the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP?



At a meeting, why does a topic come UP?



Why do we speak UP and why are the officers UP for election and why
is it UP to the secretary to writeUP a report?



We call UP our friends.



And we use it to brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver; we warm
UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen.



We lock UP the house and some guys fix UP the old car.



At other times the little word has real special meaning.



People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite,
and think UPexcuses.



To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed UPis special.



A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP.



We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night.



We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP!



To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look the word UP in
the dictionary.



In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4th of the page and
can add UP to about thirty definitions.



If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many
ways UP is used.



It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don't give UP, you
may wind UP with a hundred or more.



When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP.



When the sun comes out we say it is clearing UP.



When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes things UP.



When it doesn't rain for awhile, things dry UP.



One could go on and on, but I'll wrap it UP,



for now my time is UP,



so.......it is time to shut UP!



Now it's UP to you what you do with this email.









Re: Half wave endfed

Wayne Dillon
 

Yeah, That's my "go place" for EFHW antenna info.
God Bless de Wayne - KC0PMH


On Sat, May 10, 2014 at 5:25 PM, 'Todd F. Carney / K7TFC' k7tfc@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

Hi! My favorite paper on end-fed half-waves is by Steve Yates, AA5TB. 


Instead of a unun, he describes a capacitor-and-hand-wound-transformer setup that uses a very short (5%) counterpoise.  

73,

Todd
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
K7TFC / Medford, Oregon, USA / CN82ni / UTC-
7
 (P
​D
T)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



On Sat, May 10, 2014 at 9:33 PM, Walter - K5EST walter.k5est@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

Bobby, take a look at the seemingly best wire lengths for 9:1 baluns. Click on the Installation Notes. ...below mid-page.

http://www.balundesigns.com/servlet/the-102/QRP-9-cln-1-Unun-1.5/Detail

.........Walter . K5EST.........
Editor - Ozark QRP Banner
.............4sqrp.com............

On May 10, 2014 2:55 PM, "rolph981@... [4sqrp]" <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

I have a question for the group. If I have a 9:1 unun can I use it to feed a half wavelength of wire cut for 17 meters? Or for that matter can I use it to feed one half wavelength for any band? Will I need to use a antenna tuner to make this work? Well I guess I really have three questions! Hi Hi

Bobby






--
http://www.qsl.net/kc0pmh/   Under construction but please visit anyway.
 
QRP -  EFFICIENCY AND SKILL, NOT POWER. 
 
I'm British by birth but American by CHOICE!

Jesus came to pay a debt He didn't owe because we owe a debt we cannot pay...

The Lord bless you and keep you
The Lord make His face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you
The Lord lift up his contenance upon you and give you peace.

God Bless from Wayne Dillon - KC0PMH

Joshua 24:14-15
2 Cor 5:17
1 Jn 2:17
 

4 State QRP Group NCS - 40m & 160m
4SQRP #95
FPQRP #342 (Flying Pigs QRP Club)
NAQCC # 0759
QRP-ARCI #11505
SKCC #1155T
SOC #848
30MDG#1176
NEQRP #693
GORC #192
DMC (Digital Modes Club) # 06686


Re: Well now.. Happy Mother's Day...

Dale Putnam
 

Hi AJ,
  wow.. 14 dits.. in a row... hopefully spaced ... that would be a call that I  would need to practice a bit for...

About the steel roof.... I did that to me too... put a steel roof on the house... THEN contemplated what I had done.. 
when the 2M radio quit inside the house too... 
But I win... with a HF vert on the roof.. and a mag mount 2m vert too. 
The vert on the roof is a great dx antenna too... and if I want to do NVIS stuff... a dipole spaced a foot off the roof, works great too. 
Good Luck!!  It is a good day for antenna work too... 
now 5 inches of snow.. and continuing 30 mph wind... 
anythingn put up today, will stay up.....

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Sun, 11 May 2014 07:24:59 -0700
Subject: [4sqrp] Re: Well now.. Happy Mother's Day...

 
All the Mothers Happy Mothers Day , Yah Dale , sorry to say here is 77 @ 923 am cst , we planted some pepper and tomato seeds , and i am trying to figure out how to get an attic antenna in with our metal roof, ZYL reminded me of the metal roof , hihi. 73s AJ W5HEH, yah a lot of Dits , hihi.


Re: Well now.. Happy Mother's Day...

email4utoo@...
 

All the Mothers Happy Mothers Day , Yah Dale , sorry to say here is 77 @ 923 am cst , we planted some pepper and tomato seeds , and i am trying to figure out how to get an attic antenna in with our metal roof, ZYL reminded me of the metal roof , hihi. 73s AJ W5HEH, yah a lot of Dits , hihi.


Well now.. Happy Mother's Day...

Dale Putnam
 

Happy Mother's Day, to all the Mother's 

And in a lot of towns, the pretty outfits will be seen as Mom is taking to Dinner ...

However.. at least here... one might be better off, bundling up a bit better... with temps 
of 28F and wind in the 30s... and 4 inches of new heavy wet snow... 
Maybe next weekend would be a better choice?

Get ready.. I'm not holding onto this one.....

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy