Date   

80 m net

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Ge Group 
I got on at around 7:40 and called cq just to test the waters. 
I got a quick reply from a station in TN. 
The main difference i noticed was lower a lower qrn level at this time? 

My results at 8:30 was Chas W2SH and he was very weak. 
I'm off duty next week as NCS due to my other monthly commitment, but 
I am thinking if trying the next at 7:30 local or 1:30 z in two weeks. 

Thanks 
72 Johnny AC0BQ


40m & 80m nets

w2sh@...
 

Was a couple of minutes late getting tuned up on 40m, but nothing was heard.

80m was a different story.  ACØBQ had the best signal I've heard from him this season, RST 579 most of the time with QSB down to 549.  I only got a 339 so condx not so great there.

Temp now plus 6 in NJ, but that's probably roasty toasty compared to you guys.

72,

Charles (aka Chas), W2SH


40m Net

dekle <dekle@...>
 

Got 2 QNIs tonight:

K4VIG     Gary     TN
AB4QL    Barry    AL

There may have been a 3rd that I just couldn't pull out.

Thanks all
73
Bill
KV6Z


Re: 40m Net

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Hello Chas
Well, I snagged A Tn station on 
My first CQ!
When you get back home we can give it a try at earlier time.
About the earliest I can make it is 7:00
Pm due to my late arrivals from work!
73
Stay Warm.
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 8:17 PM Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good idea Johnny.  Sorry I can’t be around to check tonight.  Funny thing: I have chatted with Paul WA9PWP just about every week before net time, and at least at my end, I have a great signal from him.  By the time the 80m net rolls around I even have difficulty copying Paul.  I think we should experiment with this because over the summer I regularly copied Paul N0NBD on 80m, who is about 70 miles south of me.  I haven’t heard Paul in MONTHS.  In fact, we had difficulty hearing each other to exchange SKCC numbers, so he wasn’t on my list at all last month.  It’s definitely a challenge.  Johnny AC0BQ is almost exactly the same distance, measuring out at 68 miles from my home in Louisburg.

72,

Chas - NK8O


On Jan 30, 2019, at 5:56 PM, Johnny Matlock <jomatlock@...> wrote:

Ge group
I'm listening at 3.564 just to see if I can detect any difference in 80 at a earlier time. 
Call if you can we will give it a shot.
72 
Johnny AC0BQ


On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 11:54 AM WA0ITP <wa0itp@...> wrote:
Good observations Chas, and FB coaching on the RF gain control.  Yes it's an excellent way to run a receiver.

Perhaps a solution for net time would be to specify Zulu and let CST and CDT wander around on their own.  IIRC, at one time, the 80M net began at 0130z, and the 40M net convened earlier, at 0100z I think.  Prop was better then tho.

Chas, I'd like to experiment on a new starting time, but I'll be out of town until mid, maybe late  Feb with no rig.  Perhaps others want to try out the bands at new times.

Another way of increasing checkins would be to post notes on various reflectors e.g QRP-L, QRP-Tech, KQ0RP, SLQS and any other groups that come to mind.

Let's keep plugging away and make the nets better. 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com
On 1/30/2019 1:19 AM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
Bill,

I think the problem is just at 40 meters is WAY too long at 2000 central during the winter. The net *might* work at 1900, and when I first started with these nets, the first one started at 1900.  The times were moved back for summer, because it was still daylight and the bands were too short, but they never were adjusted when winter came back around.  I think that was 2 years ago, but I wouldn’t swear to it.  Remember that over the summer, even though my logins were sporadic, I made it into just about every weekly net (when I was available) on both 40 and 80.  Then winter came with shorter days and the time change.  Effectively, we go around four hours later into darkness hours during the winter months.

So I know this only suggests a solution (different start time) that may or may not work with current band conditions.  If someone is available, I’d be happy to experiment with folks to see what times, if any, work, but I can’t do it this week because I am out of town.  I could be part of some experimentation next week on the 6th of February.  We could coordinate through the talkgroup.

Another *possible* change that won’t work for a lot of folks is to go to 160m.  I find 160 very challenging because 1) some of my radios don’t have that band, 2) antennas are a problem, and 3) the NOISE on 160 is impressive.

# Tangent.  The following is a tangent.  Stop now if you’ve already had enough! #

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.  Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming.  You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room.  If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise.  You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix.  You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?”  Well, yes, it does.  But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue?  The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands.  Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

The point?  Well, if you are trying to check into the 80 meter net, you know there are signals you can hear, and the noise is overwhelming, try this technique.

# End tangent #

72,

Chas - NK8O

On Jan 28, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Johnny Matlock <jomatlock@...> wrote:

Ge Bill
I have been considering moving the net to a earlier time slot.
I would be lucky to be home in time to call at 7:00?
What do you think about a time change?
73
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Mon, Jan 28, 2019 at 2:46 PM dekle <dekle@...> wrote:
Hello all.
I'm looking for someone to take over the 40m Wednesday Night CW Net.
I haven't had much luck lately and was wondering if someone else would be able to make more contacts than I have been able to.
Thanks.
Bill
KV6Z


--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com





--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: 40m Net

Charles W. Powell
 

Good idea Johnny.  Sorry I can’t be around to check tonight.  Funny thing: I have chatted with Paul WA9PWP just about every week before net time, and at least at my end, I have a great signal from him.  By the time the 80m net rolls around I even have difficulty copying Paul.  I think we should experiment with this because over the summer I regularly copied Paul N0NBD on 80m, who is about 70 miles south of me.  I haven’t heard Paul in MONTHS.  In fact, we had difficulty hearing each other to exchange SKCC numbers, so he wasn’t on my list at all last month.  It’s definitely a challenge.  Johnny AC0BQ is almost exactly the same distance, measuring out at 68 miles from my home in Louisburg.

72,

Chas - NK8O


On Jan 30, 2019, at 5:56 PM, Johnny Matlock <jomatlock@...> wrote:

Ge group
I'm listening at 3.564 just to see if I can detect any difference in 80 at a earlier time. 
Call if you can we will give it a shot.
72 
Johnny AC0BQ


On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 11:54 AM WA0ITP <wa0itp@...> wrote:
Good observations Chas, and FB coaching on the RF gain control.  Yes it's an excellent way to run a receiver.

Perhaps a solution for net time would be to specify Zulu and let CST and CDT wander around on their own.  IIRC, at one time, the 80M net began at 0130z, and the 40M net convened earlier, at 0100z I think.  Prop was better then tho.

Chas, I'd like to experiment on a new starting time, but I'll be out of town until mid, maybe late  Feb with no rig.  Perhaps others want to try out the bands at new times.

Another way of increasing checkins would be to post notes on various reflectors e.g QRP-L, QRP-Tech, KQ0RP, SLQS and any other groups that come to mind.

Let's keep plugging away and make the nets better. 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com
On 1/30/2019 1:19 AM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
Bill,

I think the problem is just at 40 meters is WAY too long at 2000 central during the winter. The net *might* work at 1900, and when I first started with these nets, the first one started at 1900.  The times were moved back for summer, because it was still daylight and the bands were too short, but they never were adjusted when winter came back around.  I think that was 2 years ago, but I wouldn’t swear to it.  Remember that over the summer, even though my logins were sporadic, I made it into just about every weekly net (when I was available) on both 40 and 80.  Then winter came with shorter days and the time change.  Effectively, we go around four hours later into darkness hours during the winter months.

So I know this only suggests a solution (different start time) that may or may not work with current band conditions.  If someone is available, I’d be happy to experiment with folks to see what times, if any, work, but I can’t do it this week because I am out of town.  I could be part of some experimentation next week on the 6th of February.  We could coordinate through the talkgroup.

Another *possible* change that won’t work for a lot of folks is to go to 160m.  I find 160 very challenging because 1) some of my radios don’t have that band, 2) antennas are a problem, and 3) the NOISE on 160 is impressive.

# Tangent.  The following is a tangent.  Stop now if you’ve already had enough! #

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.  Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming.  You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room.  If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise.  You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix.  You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?”  Well, yes, it does.  But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue?  The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands.  Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

The point?  Well, if you are trying to check into the 80 meter net, you know there are signals you can hear, and the noise is overwhelming, try this technique.

# End tangent #

72,

Chas - NK8O

On Jan 28, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Johnny Matlock <jomatlock@...> wrote:

Ge Bill
I have been considering moving the net to a earlier time slot.
I would be lucky to be home in time to call at 7:00?
What do you think about a time change?
73
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Mon, Jan 28, 2019 at 2:46 PM dekle <dekle@...> wrote:
Hello all.
I'm looking for someone to take over the 40m Wednesday Night CW Net.
I haven't had much luck lately and was wondering if someone else would be able to make more contacts than I have been able to.
Thanks.
Bill
KV6Z


--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com






Wednesday Evening 40 and 80 meter Nets - Wed, 01/30/2019 #cal-notice

main@4SQRP.groups.io Calendar <noreply@...>
 

Wednesday Evening 40 and 80 meter Nets

When:
Wednesday, 30 January 2019
8:00pm to 9:00pm
(GMT-06:00) America/Chicago

Where:
40 and 80 Meters

Description:
The 40 Meter Net will be at 8:00 pm central time  on 7.122 +-. QRM
NCS will be Bill KV6Z.

Wednesday evening 80 Meter CW Net. will be at  (8:30PM Central Time Wednesday). 
The 80 meter net will be called on 3.564 MHz +/- QRM.
Net control operators are Johnny AC0BQ or Paul N0NBD.

* NEW *  Wednesday evening DMR Voice Net will be at (Thursday) 0300 UTC (9:00PM Central Time Wednesday/)
Four States QRP has a Brandmeister DMR Talk Group (TG31654). Join us to discuss QRP, ask questions, or just ragchew. The Wednesday net is a directed net  but any other time you may use the Talk Group to chat with other QRPers.
Net Control operator is Bert NØYJ.


Re: 40m Net

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Ge group
I'm listening at 3.564 just to see if I can detect any difference in 80 at a earlier time. 
Call if you can we will give it a shot.
72 
Johnny AC0BQ


On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 11:54 AM WA0ITP <wa0itp@...> wrote:
Good observations Chas, and FB coaching on the RF gain control.  Yes it's an excellent way to run a receiver.

Perhaps a solution for net time would be to specify Zulu and let CST and CDT wander around on their own.  IIRC, at one time, the 80M net began at 0130z, and the 40M net convened earlier, at 0100z I think.  Prop was better then tho.

Chas, I'd like to experiment on a new starting time, but I'll be out of town until mid, maybe late  Feb with no rig.  Perhaps others want to try out the bands at new times.

Another way of increasing checkins would be to post notes on various reflectors e.g QRP-L, QRP-Tech, KQ0RP, SLQS and any other groups that come to mind.

Let's keep plugging away and make the nets better. 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com
On 1/30/2019 1:19 AM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
Bill,

I think the problem is just at 40 meters is WAY too long at 2000 central during the winter. The net *might* work at 1900, and when I first started with these nets, the first one started at 1900.  The times were moved back for summer, because it was still daylight and the bands were too short, but they never were adjusted when winter came back around.  I think that was 2 years ago, but I wouldn’t swear to it.  Remember that over the summer, even though my logins were sporadic, I made it into just about every weekly net (when I was available) on both 40 and 80.  Then winter came with shorter days and the time change.  Effectively, we go around four hours later into darkness hours during the winter months.

So I know this only suggests a solution (different start time) that may or may not work with current band conditions.  If someone is available, I’d be happy to experiment with folks to see what times, if any, work, but I can’t do it this week because I am out of town.  I could be part of some experimentation next week on the 6th of February.  We could coordinate through the talkgroup.

Another *possible* change that won’t work for a lot of folks is to go to 160m.  I find 160 very challenging because 1) some of my radios don’t have that band, 2) antennas are a problem, and 3) the NOISE on 160 is impressive.

# Tangent.  The following is a tangent.  Stop now if you’ve already had enough! #

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.  Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming.  You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room.  If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise.  You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix.  You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?”  Well, yes, it does.  But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue?  The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands.  Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

The point?  Well, if you are trying to check into the 80 meter net, you know there are signals you can hear, and the noise is overwhelming, try this technique.

# End tangent #

72,

Chas - NK8O

On Jan 28, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Johnny Matlock <jomatlock@...> wrote:

Ge Bill
I have been considering moving the net to a earlier time slot.
I would be lucky to be home in time to call at 7:00?
What do you think about a time change?
73
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Mon, Jan 28, 2019 at 2:46 PM dekle <dekle@...> wrote:
Hello all.
I'm looking for someone to take over the 40m Wednesday Night CW Net.
I haven't had much luck lately and was wondering if someone else would be able to make more contacts than I have been able to.
Thanks.
Bill
KV6Z


--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com



Re: RF Gain control

Charles W. Powell
 

An opportunity to design a mod for the radio?

72,

Chas - NK8O

On Jan 30, 2019, at 12:08 PM, Jim Pruitt <jpruitt67@...> wrote:

The idea is a good one and has been for decades. The one question I had was...what do we use with most of the current homebrew and direct conversion rigs that have no separate RF gain controls to allow us to do this magic?

Thank you.

Jim Pruitt
WA7DUY


On 1/29/2019 11:19 PM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
Bill,

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise. We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals. That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain. Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming. You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room. If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise. You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix. You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?” Well, yes, it does. But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue? The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands. Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

Chas - NK8O



Re: RF Gain control

Chris Howard w0ep
 

An external step attenuator?

On 1/30/19 2:08 PM, Jim Pruitt wrote:
The idea is a good one and has been for decades.  The one question I had was...what do we use with most of the current homebrew and direct conversion rigs that have no separate RF gain controls to allow us to do this magic?

Thank you.

Jim Pruitt
WA7DUY


On 1/29/2019 11:19 PM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
Bill,

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.  Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming.  You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room.  If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise.  You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix.  You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?”  Well, yes, it does.  But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue?  The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands.  Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

Chas - NK8O




Re: RF Gain control

Lee
 

I've done this (throttling the RG gain) for years, and I also teach it to new general licensees who are starting out on low bands. With the low bands, sensitivity is usually not an issue; even a rig with the sensitivity of a drill sergeant will hear signals on 80 and 160. What you need is increased SNR, especially for the CW signals right at or above the noise level. Even a small increase in SNR will often let a signal pop out of the noise. This technique got me DXCC on 160m with a Windom and no separate receive antenna.

For rigs without a RF gain control, a switchable attenuator may be the trick, especially if you run separate transmit/receive................

73 es GL de Lee KX4TT



The idea is a good one and has been for decades. The one question I had was...what do we use with most of the current homebrew and direct conversion rigs that have no separate RF gain controls to allow us to do this magic?

Thank you.

Jim Pruitt
WA7DUY

On 1/29/2019 11:19 PM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
Bill,

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the
old timers” say about dealing with noise. We are all used to cranking
the AF gain to try to hear signals. That works fine on upper bands,
but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the
RF gain. Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you
turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming. You
know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud,
you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw
your headphones across the room. If you reduce the RF gain to where
the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly
audible at a reasonable level over the noise. You have optimized your
signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix. You might
ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?” Well,
yes, it does. But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that
level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your
level of fatigue? The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain
back up when you change bands. Otherwise you’ll think the front-end
of your radio is blown!

Chas - NK8O


Wednesday Evening 40 and 80 meter Nets - Wed, 01/30/2019 8:00pm-9:00pm #cal-reminder

main@4SQRP.groups.io Calendar <main@...>
 

Reminder:
Wednesday Evening 40 and 80 meter Nets

When:
Wednesday, 30 January 2019
8:00pm to 9:00pm
(GMT-06:00) America/Chicago

Where:
40 and 80 Meters

Organizer:
jomatlock@...

Description:
The 40 Meter Net will be at 8:00 pm central time  on 7.122 +-. QRM
NCS will be Bill KV6Z.

Wednesday evening 80 Meter CW Net. will be at  (8:30PM Central Time Wednesday). 
The 80 meter net will be called on 3.564 MHz +/- QRM.
Net control operators are Johnny AC0BQ or Paul N0NBD.

* NEW *  Wednesday evening DMR Voice Net will be at (Thursday) 0300 UTC (9:00PM Central Time Wednesday/)
Four States QRP has a Brandmeister DMR Talk Group (TG31654). Join us to discuss QRP, ask questions, or just ragchew. The Wednesday net is a directed net  but any other time you may use the Talk Group to chat with other QRPers.
Net Control operator is Bert NØYJ.

View Event


Re: RF Gain control

Jim Pruitt
 

The idea is a good one and has been for decades.  The one question I had was...what do we use with most of the current homebrew and direct conversion rigs that have no separate RF gain controls to allow us to do this magic?

Thank you.

Jim Pruitt
WA7DUY

On 1/29/2019 11:19 PM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
Bill,

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.  Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming.  You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room.  If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise.  You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix.  You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?”  Well, yes, it does.  But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue?  The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands.  Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

Chas - NK8O


Re: 40m Net

WA0ITP
 

Good observations Chas, and FB coaching on the RF gain control.  Yes it's an excellent way to run a receiver.

Perhaps a solution for net time would be to specify Zulu and let CST and CDT wander around on their own.  IIRC, at one time, the 80M net began at 0130z, and the 40M net convened earlier, at 0100z I think.  Prop was better then tho.

Chas, I'd like to experiment on a new starting time, but I'll be out of town until mid, maybe late  Feb with no rig.  Perhaps others want to try out the bands at new times.

Another way of increasing checkins would be to post notes on various reflectors e.g QRP-L, QRP-Tech, KQ0RP, SLQS and any other groups that come to mind.

Let's keep plugging away and make the nets better. 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com
On 1/30/2019 1:19 AM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:

Bill,

I think the problem is just at 40 meters is WAY too long at 2000 central during the winter. The net *might* work at 1900, and when I first started with these nets, the first one started at 1900.  The times were moved back for summer, because it was still daylight and the bands were too short, but they never were adjusted when winter came back around.  I think that was 2 years ago, but I wouldn’t swear to it.  Remember that over the summer, even though my logins were sporadic, I made it into just about every weekly net (when I was available) on both 40 and 80.  Then winter came with shorter days and the time change.  Effectively, we go around four hours later into darkness hours during the winter months.

So I know this only suggests a solution (different start time) that may or may not work with current band conditions.  If someone is available, I’d be happy to experiment with folks to see what times, if any, work, but I can’t do it this week because I am out of town.  I could be part of some experimentation next week on the 6th of February.  We could coordinate through the talkgroup.

Another *possible* change that won’t work for a lot of folks is to go to 160m.  I find 160 very challenging because 1) some of my radios don’t have that band, 2) antennas are a problem, and 3) the NOISE on 160 is impressive.

# Tangent.  The following is a tangent.  Stop now if you’ve already had enough! #

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.  Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming.  You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room.  If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise.  You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix.  You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?”  Well, yes, it does.  But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue?  The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands.  Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

The point?  Well, if you are trying to check into the 80 meter net, you know there are signals you can hear, and the noise is overwhelming, try this technique.

# End tangent #

72,

Chas - NK8O

On Jan 28, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Johnny Matlock <jomatlock@...> wrote:

Ge Bill
I have been considering moving the net to a earlier time slot.
I would be lucky to be home in time to call at 7:00?
What do you think about a time change?
73
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Mon, Jan 28, 2019 at 2:46 PM dekle <dekle@...> wrote:
Hello all.
I'm looking for someone to take over the 40m Wednesday Night CW Net.
I haven't had much luck lately and was wondering if someone else would be able to make more contacts than I have been able to.
Thanks.
Bill
KV6Z


--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com



Re: 40m Net

Tim N9PUZ
 

The RF Gain control is the unsung here of any full featured radio. New hams are constantly amazed at turning up the volume and riding the RF Gain control to listen to other stations.

Tim / N9PUZ

On 1/30/2019 1:19 AM, Charles W. Powell via Groups.Io wrote:
# Tangent.  The following is a tangent.  Stop now if you’ve already had enough! #

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.


Re: 40m Net

Charles W. Powell
 

Bill,

I think the problem is just at 40 meters is WAY too long at 2000 central during the winter. The net *might* work at 1900, and when I first started with these nets, the first one started at 1900.  The times were moved back for summer, because it was still daylight and the bands were too short, but they never were adjusted when winter came back around.  I think that was 2 years ago, but I wouldn’t swear to it.  Remember that over the summer, even though my logins were sporadic, I made it into just about every weekly net (when I was available) on both 40 and 80.  Then winter came with shorter days and the time change.  Effectively, we go around four hours later into darkness hours during the winter months.

So I know this only suggests a solution (different start time) that may or may not work with current band conditions.  If someone is available, I’d be happy to experiment with folks to see what times, if any, work, but I can’t do it this week because I am out of town.  I could be part of some experimentation next week on the 6th of February.  We could coordinate through the talkgroup.

Another *possible* change that won’t work for a lot of folks is to go to 160m.  I find 160 very challenging because 1) some of my radios don’t have that band, 2) antennas are a problem, and 3) the NOISE on 160 is impressive.

# Tangent.  The following is a tangent.  Stop now if you’ve already had enough! #

Having said all that, I discovered working last month that what “the old timers” say about dealing with noise.  We are all used to cranking the AF gain to try to hear signals.  That works fine on upper bands, but on 60, 80, and 160, the adjustment should be primarily through the RF gain.  Why? Let me put it this way: If you have S9 noise and you turn up the AF gain on the radio, the noise becomes overwhelming.  You know there is a signal that you can hear, but the noise is so loud, you can’t listen for more than a few minutes before you want to throw your headphones across the room.  If you reduce the RF gain to where the noise is at a tolerable level, then that signal is suddenly audible at a reasonable level over the noise.  You have optimized your signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the noise in the mix.  You might ask, “Doesn’t this reduce the sensitivity of the receiver?”  Well, yes, it does.  But if your noise is S-whatever, everything below that level is useless to you. So why amplify the noise and increase your level of fatigue?  The only thing to remember is to turn the RF gain back up when you change bands.  Otherwise you’ll think the front-end of your radio is blown!

The point?  Well, if you are trying to check into the 80 meter net, you know there are signals you can hear, and the noise is overwhelming, try this technique.

# End tangent #

72,

Chas - NK8O

On Jan 28, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Johnny Matlock <jomatlock@...> wrote:

Ge Bill
I have been considering moving the net to a earlier time slot.
I would be lucky to be home in time to call at 7:00?
What do you think about a time change?
73
Johnny AC0BQ 

On Mon, Jan 28, 2019 at 2:46 PM dekle <dekle@...> wrote:
Hello all.
I'm looking for someone to take over the 40m Wednesday Night CW Net.
I haven't had much luck lately and was wondering if someone else would be able to make more contacts than I have been able to.
Thanks.
Bill
KV6Z


--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: working on alignment hilltopper 20

KM6KJE
 

thanks, I got it

On Tuesday, January 29, 2019, 6:35:12 PM PST, Dave Benson <davek1swl@...> wrote:


Terry-

Your frequency counter connects to the center pin of the BNC connector (J1). The counter's ground lead can be clipped to the BNC connector's shell.

When you power up with the jumper installed, the Hilltopper transmits for 5 seconds. During that time, you turn the tuning knob to bring the frequency to 14060 kHz.

-  Dave, K1SWL

On Tue, Jan 29, 2019 at 7:40 PM KM6KJE <terry.schulz@...> wrote:
I was wondering what the center pin was to hook up a frequency counter to the section is alignment the CAL placement pin has only two pins  thanks


Re: working on alignment hilltopper 20

Dave Benson
 

Terry-

Your frequency counter connects to the center pin of the BNC connector (J1). The counter's ground lead can be clipped to the BNC connector's shell.

When you power up with the jumper installed, the Hilltopper transmits for 5 seconds. During that time, you turn the tuning knob to bring the frequency to 14060 kHz.

-  Dave, K1SWL


On Tue, Jan 29, 2019 at 7:40 PM KM6KJE <terry.schulz@...> wrote:
I was wondering what the center pin was to hook up a frequency counter to the section is alignment the CAL placement pin has only two pins  thanks


thank you

Bill Lamm
 



Wednesday Evening 40 and 80 meter Nets - Wed, 01/30/2019 8:00pm-9:00pm #cal-reminder

main@4SQRP.groups.io Calendar <main@...>
 

Reminder:
Wednesday Evening 40 and 80 meter Nets

When:
Wednesday, 30 January 2019
8:00pm to 9:00pm
(GMT-06:00) America/Chicago

Where:
40 and 80 Meters

Organizer:
jomatlock@...

Description:
The 40 Meter Net will be at 8:00 pm central time  on 7.122 +-. QRM
NCS will be Bill KV6Z.

Wednesday evening 80 Meter CW Net. will be at  (8:30PM Central Time Wednesday). 
The 80 meter net will be called on 3.564 MHz +/- QRM.
Net control operators are Johnny AC0BQ or Paul N0NBD.

* NEW *  Wednesday evening DMR Voice Net will be at (Thursday) 0300 UTC (9:00PM Central Time Wednesday/)
Four States QRP has a Brandmeister DMR Talk Group (TG31654). Join us to discuss QRP, ask questions, or just ragchew. The Wednesday net is a directed net  but any other time you may use the Talk Group to chat with other QRPers.
Net Control operator is Bert NØYJ.

View Event


working on alignment hilltopper 20

KM6KJE
 

I was wondering what the center pin was to hook up a frequency counter to the section is alignment the CAL placement pin has only two pins  thanks