Date   

Re: 4 S Tuner Malfunction Query

griffithsesq.robert
 

Thanks Dave, I will check it out.
Griff NE3I

Robert Alan Griffiths

On Jul 23, 2018, at 11:01 AM, David Furst <dfurst@...> wrote:

Robert, I also just built the 4S tuner and had similar problems to what you described.  I found that the wires from switch SW1 were touching the switch body (the metallic part) thus shorting the XCVR line to ground.  Check to see if you have very high resistance from the center pin of the XCVR BNC (J2) to chassis ground with the switch in the OUT position and the antenna disconnected.  You should also have some resistance (abt 94 ohms) with the switch in the IN position.  You don't have to disassemble the unit to measure this point. If you have a grounded J2, check the wires at the switch:  NONE should be touching the switch body.  This was just a careless mistake on my part and once I moved the wires away from the switch, the unit worked fine. Initial visual checks didn't reveal the wires touching unless you look at the switch from the side. Hope this helps.
Dave Furst WA3INF


Re: 4 S Tuner Malfunction Query

David Furst
 

Robert, I also just built the 4S tuner and had similar problems to what you described.  I found that the wires from switch SW1 were touching the switch body (the metallic part) thus shorting the XCVR line to ground.  Check to see if you have very high resistance from the center pin of the XCVR BNC (J2) to chassis ground with the switch in the OUT position and the antenna disconnected.  You should also have some resistance (abt 94 ohms) with the switch in the IN position.  You don't have to disassemble the unit to measure this point. If you have a grounded J2, check the wires at the switch:  NONE should be touching the switch body.  This was just a careless mistake on my part and once I moved the wires away from the switch, the unit worked fine. Initial visual checks didn't reveal the wires touching unless you look at the switch from the side. Hope this helps.
Dave Furst WA3INF


Re: 4 S Tuner Malfunction Query

Bob Zolecki
 

Sounds like bad solder joint around led circuit as seems tuner part is working and noise will not be as loud in tune mode as it is with tuner out.

On Jul 22, 2018, at 9:21 PM, griffithsesq.robert via Groups.Io <signalnaut=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I recently built the 4S Tuner. Neither light illuminates. In the tuning mode, adjusting the switch and capacitor positions varies the noise level however, in no position is the noise level as loud as it is without the tuner in the line at all. I have checked the wiring of the components as best as I could with a VOM. Perhaps I damaged a component during soldering. Any suggestions? Nice unit. Would like to have a working one for along side my Bayou Jumper and any future rig I build.
Griff NE3I
Robert Alan Griffiths



4S-Tuner: What is minimum TX power to drive the SWR and Power LEDs?

George H. Gates
 

I have built several tuners using a led as a indicator. Works ok with my 1/2 watt rigs. 72 George/W2BPI


Murania Broadcast Band Receiver

Larry Hastings
 

Opened up 4SQRP lastest Kit. "Murania AM Broadcast Band Receiver".
Wow this is a great beginners kit. If they are old enough to read instructions, and
you help them a little on soldering they will love it.
It's not a DX machine, but if you have a couple of local AM station it will work fine.
I love the case. Make sure you print off the color picture file. It helps alot. .
The only change I made was to change the feedback loop from 1.5 " to 2.0" long.
 Thanks David, Great kit.
Larry Hastings AB0AH


4 S Tuner Malfunction Query

griffithsesq.robert
 

I recently built the 4S Tuner. Neither light illuminates. In the tuning mode, adjusting the switch and capacitor positions varies the noise level however, in no position is the noise level as loud as it is without the tuner in the line at all. I have checked the wiring of the components as best as I could with a VOM. Perhaps I damaged a component during soldering. Any suggestions? Nice unit. Would like to have a working one for along side my Bayou Jumper and any future rig I build.
Griff NE3I
Robert Alan Griffiths


4S-Tuner: What is minimum TX power to drive the SWR and Power LEDs?

Michael Sciascia
 

In the tune mode, the power to drive the SWR/Power LEDs is provided by the transmitter.   I understand that the tuner is good to 10W, but what is the minimum power that will adequately drive the SWR/Power LEDs?    500mW?  100mW?


Re: Kit building solder station

David Wilcox
 

No matter what soldering set you use I have found that one should order two (especially if they are inexpensive.  Mine were about $40 each)!  I ordered two in error but have found that having one set up with a fine tip and the other set up with a larger tip (for larger parts, coax connectors, etc.) allows me to continue working without having to let it cool down and change tips.  Also, if one goes bad you still have the other.  My first one went bad until one day the sun showed on the iron tip cord just right and it showed cat teeth marks.  Now I have two again and the cat is not allowed in the shack.

Just my not so humble opinion,

Dave K8WPE since 1960.

On Jul 21, 2018, at 1:40 PM, Donald Sanders <w4bws1@...> wrote:

Rob, There are many choices for a good solder station. I looked at several and decided to buy the Solomon SR-976 from Circuit Specialists. It is variable temp and about $45 if I remember correctly.  I bought several solder wicks and a couple other tips for the iron. I saved a few bucks each month and am glad I found this station. Not fancy but after 6 months I am very satisfied.

Dr. Don W4BWS


On Sat, Jul 21, 2018 at 11:54 AM, Dan Reynolds <on30ng@...> wrote:
Rob, I recently purchased one of those YiHua 936 (actually a Hakko clone and will take their tips). My favorite soldering iron power supply shot craps and wanted a backup. I think it's pretty good especially for the price - almost a ridiculous price in fact. I used it a little bit and I'm pleased. Like I said I wanted it as a backup.
My main iron is a Metcal. I'm not bragging -- I fell into an incredible deal and I think the Metcal irons are probably the best there is. It's a big heave black box - all heat sink, with a slender super flexible cable going to a very comfortable handle. The tips are more like cartridges that determine the heat range and tip size etc. There must be 100's of tips for them.There are several generations and styles of these stations including rework stations with vacuum and such. 
I was very fortunate to get one. I couldn't normally have afforded one and wouldn't pay that much for a soldering iron! But a great ham I met online and I horse traded some kits and stuff and that's how I got one. He worked where he got the old ones from his workplace and restored/refurbished and sold them at hamfests and such to make mad money to supply his hobby. These are professional stations and sell for BIG $$ when they're new. They're induction heated. Mine can melt solder in about 2 seconds. Seriously. The cord as I said is super flexible. It's actually coax. The induction part runs at 27 MHz. Talk about a dummy load just heating up!
If you get a chance to get one that works, with handle, power supply and some tips you need to try one. Mine has this heavy iron base with sponge and it won't move - it's great. Trust me you will never turn back. 
PS One thing I absolutely learned - have a back up! That's why I kept the YiHua till I replaced the power supply on mine.
--
Dan Reynolds -- KB9JLO
<><



Re: Kit building solder station

Rob Roberts
 

Thanks everyone for the replies and ideas!

kd0wkv


Re: Kit building solder station

Donald Sanders
 

Rob, There are many choices for a good solder station. I looked at several and decided to buy the Solomon SR-976 from Circuit Specialists. It is variable temp and about $45 if I remember correctly.  I bought several solder wicks and a couple other tips for the iron. I saved a few bucks each month and am glad I found this station. Not fancy but after 6 months I am very satisfied.

Dr. Don W4BWS


On Sat, Jul 21, 2018 at 11:54 AM, Dan Reynolds <on30ng@...> wrote:
Rob, I recently purchased one of those YiHua 936 (actually a Hakko clone and will take their tips). My favorite soldering iron power supply shot craps and wanted a backup. I think it's pretty good especially for the price - almost a ridiculous price in fact. I used it a little bit and I'm pleased. Like I said I wanted it as a backup.
My main iron is a Metcal. I'm not bragging -- I fell into an incredible deal and I think the Metcal irons are probably the best there is. It's a big heave black box - all heat sink, with a slender super flexible cable going to a very comfortable handle. The tips are more like cartridges that determine the heat range and tip size etc. There must be 100's of tips for them.There are several generations and styles of these stations including rework stations with vacuum and such. 
I was very fortunate to get one. I couldn't normally have afforded one and wouldn't pay that much for a soldering iron! But a great ham I met online and I horse traded some kits and stuff and that's how I got one. He worked where he got the old ones from his workplace and restored/refurbished and sold them at hamfests and such to make mad money to supply his hobby. These are professional stations and sell for BIG $$ when they're new. They're induction heated. Mine can melt solder in about 2 seconds. Seriously. The cord as I said is super flexible. It's actually coax. The induction part runs at 27 MHz. Talk about a dummy load just heating up!
If you get a chance to get one that works, with handle, power supply and some tips you need to try one. Mine has this heavy iron base with sponge and it won't move - it's great. Trust me you will never turn back. 
PS One thing I absolutely learned - have a back up! That's why I kept the YiHua till I replaced the power supply on mine.
--
Dan Reynolds -- KB9JLO
<><



Re: Kit building solder station

Dan Reynolds
 

Rob, I recently purchased one of those YiHua 936 (actually a Hakko clone and will take their tips). My favorite soldering iron power supply shot craps and wanted a backup. I think it's pretty good especially for the price - almost a ridiculous price in fact. I used it a little bit and I'm pleased. Like I said I wanted it as a backup.
My main iron is a Metcal. I'm not bragging -- I fell into an incredible deal and I think the Metcal irons are probably the best there is. It's a big heave black box - all heat sink, with a slender super flexible cable going to a very comfortable handle. The tips are more like cartridges that determine the heat range and tip size etc. There must be 100's of tips for them.There are several generations and styles of these stations including rework stations with vacuum and such. 
I was very fortunate to get one. I couldn't normally have afforded one and wouldn't pay that much for a soldering iron! But a great ham I met online and I horse traded some kits and stuff and that's how I got one. He worked where he got the old ones from his workplace and restored/refurbished and sold them at hamfests and such to make mad money to supply his hobby. These are professional stations and sell for BIG $$ when they're new. They're induction heated. Mine can melt solder in about 2 seconds. Seriously. The cord as I said is super flexible. It's actually coax. The induction part runs at 27 MHz. Talk about a dummy load just heating up!
If you get a chance to get one that works, with handle, power supply and some tips you need to try one. Mine has this heavy iron base with sponge and it won't move - it's great. Trust me you will never turn back. 
PS One thing I absolutely learned - have a back up! That's why I kept the YiHua till I replaced the power supply on mine.
--
Dan Reynolds -- KB9JLO
<><


Re: Kit building

John - KK4ITX
 

Rob,

One of your questions was the diameter of the solder.... my preference is to start with is .015 for the tight work and maybe .031 for the larger components, when you get to cables and wires you might move toward .062.

Just to recap, chisel tip, “lead” solder, heat the component lead and feed the solder to it.

Oddly, I used to have trouble with trembling and gave up stuff like that until I got back into radio. I believe that it was lack of patience causing my issues as now (75yrs) my work actually does (work) and it looks good too !

Glad that I found the 4SQRP, the kits are a blast, hope you have the same experience.

John
KK4ITX

If you need a parachute and don't have one you probably won't need one again.


Re: Kit building

cornhusker
 

On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 8:17 PM, Rob Roberts via Groups.Io
<kd0wkv@...> wrote:
Hello all,

I’m looking for advice on what brand of soldering iron and what type/thickness of solder do you recommend for kit building. Right now I’m using a cheap soldering iron from Harbor Freight and practicing on pixies.  Any advice or links would be appreciated. 

Rob
kd0wkv


Re: Kit building

Dale Putnam
 

I've used most of the available soldering irons, and have kept the 898D+ 2 in 1, because it is easy to set the temp, and easy to swap tips. and the tips seem to last a lot longer than others. Doesn't make noise either in my ear, or in the radios. HOWEVER, the care and maintenance of the tip is essential on all of these irons.

And I echo the warnings to stay away from acid core.. that is a no brainer.. and to stay clear away from no lead solder.. that is a certainty for return repairs, especially on board kits that are intended to be portable or moved much at all, SMD OR hole thru! No amount of temp control, flow control, elasticity of the solder, or not, will "fix" the issues with no lead. No lead is simply a marketing tool, that has NO application to longevity of use, or reliability of connections.


Good Luck with the builds.

Let me add, one tiny note.. the setting of temp, and the amount of time actually on the connection, combine to make up reliable connection.. or not. Too much, of either is a real bad thing. Not enough heat and too long.. is still very poor, too much heat, very little time.. just enough to flow is ok.. and setting the temp then controlling the time on is the easiest and most repeatable.


Have a great day,
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy

"Actions speak louder than words"
1856 - Abraham Lincoln



Re: Kit building

Darryl J Kelly
 

I borrowed a friends's Aoyue 469 and liked it so well I bought my own. $30 from Amazon and other places, up to 80 watts, uses Hakko type types. I prefer the 1.2mm chisel for kit building. Just finished a QRX20, and it worked the first time. Darryl, KK5IB


Re: Kit building

W0IIT
 

What a great response to this question!!  This is a prime example of why 4State folks are the best and why our group continues to grow, even in times of poor propagation!!!

cu es 72 Bart W0IIT
4Sqrp #72, Flying Pig #11,




On Jul 19, 2018, at 11:36 PM, Frank Artieta <73tuudefrank@...> wrote:

Hello :)

Good work soldering modern electronics , works best using quality tools and solder !

I use a HAKKO FX-88D Digital Soldering Station !
The Tip is a 1.6mm HAKT18D16P T18-D16
Stay away from lead free solder !!!!!!!
I do not know what lead free solder is really good for but can guarantee it is not the stuff to use on small thru hole components !!!!!!!!!

The solder I use is KESTER Rosin Core .60mm / 0.25" My Favorite
The part numbers are ! SM63PB37   #66/285

I am sure 0.30 " would work great also !

Certainly there are other good brands of soldering equipment but I love my  HAKKO FX-88D 

And do not use lead free solder or acid core solder ! EVER !!!!!
I recommend you try to find some good YouTube videos that you trust and watch them !

The truth can be expensive !
But this the truth !

I hope this helps !
73 de kd5ald



Re: Kit building

Mike D
 

I am a big fan of the Weller wesd51 for through-hole.  It, or a similar Hakko are the best options for a beginner.


On Thu, Jul 19, 2018, 8:17 PM Rob Roberts via Groups.Io <kd0wkv=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello all,

I’m looking for advice on what brand of soldering iron and what type/thickness of solder do you recommend for kit building. Right now I’m using a cheap soldering iron from Harbor Freight and practicing on pixies.  Any advice or links would be appreciated. 

Rob
kd0wkv


Kit building solder station

Rob <roomberg@...>
 

I have been using this soldering iron for 2 years
and have been extremely pleased  with it.
YiHua 936 Rework Soldering Station SMD DesolderingSolder Iron w/ Stand 110V US

https://www.ebay.com/itm/381444146894

I don't know why its title says REWORK and SMD and DESOLDERING

It is really nothing more than a soldering iron.


AND
use KESTER 44 solder .... you will not be disappointed.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/202006855960

73 Rob KB3BYT


Re: Kit building

Frank Artieta
 

Hello :)

Good work soldering modern electronics , works best using quality tools and solder !

I use a HAKKO FX-88D Digital Soldering Station !
The Tip is a 1.6mm HAKT18D16P T18-D16
Stay away from lead free solder !!!!!!!
I do not know what lead free solder is really good for but can guarantee it is not the stuff to use on small thru hole components !!!!!!!!!

The solder I use is KESTER Rosin Core .60mm / 0.25" My Favorite
The part numbers are ! SM63PB37   #66/285

I am sure 0.30 " would work great also !

Certainly there are other good brands of soldering equipment but I love my  HAKKO FX-88D 

And do not use lead free solder or acid core solder ! EVER !!!!!
I recommend you try to find some good YouTube videos that you trust and watch them !

The truth can be expensive !
But this the truth !

I hope this helps !
73 de kd5ald


Re: Kit building

Mike Scheidt
 

Rob,

 

A very accomplished kit builder (W0EB) is a friend of mine.  He steered me to Walmart and on his suggestion, I purchased a 2 in 1 soldering station.  The title of this one says it’s also lead free.  It does soldering and also has a hot air gun for some SMD work.  Anyway, it runs about $63 and I’ve been exceptionally happy with mine.  Also, if you check out the Walmart website, they have many other types and price ranges to choose from.  I  like the one W0EB suggested as the temperature can be set fairly precisely.

 

I had mine shipped to me, as not all Walmarts stock very many (if any) soldering stuff. 

 

Good luck.

 

Mike

N0XM

 

From: main@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:main@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rob Roberts via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 11:54 AM
To: main@4SQRP.groups.io
Subject: [4SQRP] Kit building

 

Hello all,

I’m looking for advice on what brand of soldering iron and what type/thickness of solder do you recommend for kit building. Right now I’m using a cheap soldering iron from Harbor Freight and practicing on pixies.  Any advice or links would be appreciated. 

Rob
kd0wkv


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