Date   

Re: Soldering Iron Temperature

Cliff Fox (KU4GW)
 

Those were some great soldering tips Ron! Thanks! I wanted to tell you about a tip cleaner I discovered that works great. I saw the stuff they sell on Amazon that has steel wool in a snap closed container. Well, my 79 year old mom uses these things for scrubbing pots and dishes called Scotchbrite Stainless Steel Scrubbing Pads that are made from coarsely shredded stainless steel.  I took one of them and stuffed it down inside a small jelly jar and it works great for cleaning the tip on my iron. Just push it into it over and over 2-3 times and the tip looks like brand new!

Very 72/73 de Cliff KU4GW
Proud Member of the ARRL A-1 Operator Club (*Elected to Full Membership April 11, 2012
4SQRP # 536
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"It's not the class of license that the Amateur holds that matters, it's the class of the Amateur who holds the license!" 


Re: 30 Meter Hilltopper Kit

Gary E. Kohtala
 

Now all we need is a Hilltopper-80 to round out the set.  Emoji

Best regards,

Gary, K7EK


Re: 30 Meter Hilltopper Kit

WA0ITP
 

Wow, NIce Job everyone!  What a great group of excellent rigs.  Ron the manual is very well done.  

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 3:13 PM Johnny AC0BQ <jomatlock@...> wrote:
Good afternoon
I am pleased to announce that our kit
Group for the Hilltoppers has packaged up a 30 meter version.

We previously only kitted them by special request.

The link for the info is found here:
A special Thanks goes to Ron Potter and Jim Pruitt for modifying the manual.

Thanks,
Happy Thanksgiving
72
Johnny ACØBQ 



--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com



--


Re: 30 Meter Hilltopper Kit

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Ge Charles 
I don’t think so.
We just blended them into the manual.
72
Johnny 

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 3:28 PM Charles W. Powell via groups.io <doctorcwp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Are there any changes from Dave(Benson)'s original calculations?

72,

Chas - NK8O

On 11/23/20 3:13 PM, Johnny AC0BQ wrote:
Good afternoon
I am pleased to announce that our kit
Group for the Hilltoppers has packaged up a 30 meter version.

We previously only kitted them by special request.

The link for the info is found here:
A special Thanks goes to Ron Potter and Jim Pruitt for modifying the manual.

Thanks,
Happy Thanksgiving
72
Johnny ACØBQ 



--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com

--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: 60 Meter crystals needed

 

I don't know anything about the QRP Labs ' ProgRock rig...not even knowledgeable about QRP Labs.  Is their website qrplabs,com or something like that?  I will try to go check them out.

EuGene, KA5NLY


Re: 30 Meter Hilltopper Kit

Charles W. Powell
 

Are there any changes from Dave(Benson)'s original calculations?

72,

Chas - NK8O

On 11/23/20 3:13 PM, Johnny AC0BQ wrote:
Good afternoon
I am pleased to announce that our kit
Group for the Hilltoppers has packaged up a 30 meter version.

We previously only kitted them by special request.

The link for the info is found here:
A special Thanks goes to Ron Potter and Jim Pruitt for modifying the manual.

Thanks,
Happy Thanksgiving
72
Johnny ACØBQ 



--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


30 Meter Hilltopper Kit

Johnny AC0BQ
 

Good afternoon
I am pleased to announce that our kit
Group for the Hilltoppers has packaged up a 30 meter version.

We previously only kitted them by special request.

The link for the info is found here:
A special Thanks goes to Ron Potter and Jim Pruitt for modifying the manual.

Thanks,
Happy Thanksgiving
72
Johnny ACØBQ 



--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


Re: Soldering Iron Temperature

WB9YZU
 

I would bet there was volumes of scientific evidence to support that claim ;)
What it would do is increase the mass the element would need to heat. I'm not sure about the premature failure, but it would take longer to come up to temp, and longer to cool down.

Solder tips were the high volume items, not the heating element.
They were simple copper or steel tips with little or no cladding; they would be eaten away pretty quickly.

On my old Weller guns, I don't even bother to buy tips anymore, I just strip a piece of left over #12 Solid. They seem to last as long ;)

The controlled 40W Station is still using the same tip it had when I got it 15 years ago.
--
, Ron WB9YZU


Re: What is a QRP Ozark 17 transceiver?

 

Thanks, Johnny.

I was thinking about buying a dead one that is listed on FleaBag (aka, eBay), but it sounds like it would be very difficult to work on it, and likely more trouble than it's worth.  I bet I can find a nice 17 meter qrp xcvr kit, either here in the 4SQRP Store or from QRPme, and not have the hassle of trying to fix a busted one.  Also the one that is for sale is almost $47 with shipping and I can most likely get a new kit for about that cost or less.

Yep, I will pass on that QRP Boat Anchor!!

Thanks again!

EuGene, KA5NLY


Re: What is a QRP Ozark 17 transceiver?

Johnny AC0BQ
 


Hello Eugene 
I can shed a little light on the subject.

It was a 17 meter transceiver that was put out many years ago by the 4 state group.

It was redesigned for SMT parts and is currently in holding because it is very difficult to kit these parts.

They are not only small but the caps aren’t marked once they leave the Mfg package.

72
Johnny ACØBQ 

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 11:44 AM bigusmith via groups.io <bigusmith=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been trying to google and otherwise track down information on the Ozark 17 meter QRP transceiver with no luck.  I am seeking a copy of the manual, schematic, and other info, including assembly instructions if it was a kit.

Can anyone help me in my search?

EuGene, KA5NLY

--
Check out the 4SQRP website at 4sqrp.com


What is a QRP Ozark 17 transceiver?

 

I have been trying to google and otherwise track down information on the Ozark 17 meter QRP transceiver with no luck.  I am seeking a copy of the manual, schematic, and other info, including assembly instructions if it was a kit.

Can anyone help me in my search?

EuGene, KA5NLY


Re: Soldering Iron Temperature

Paul Goemans
 

Well,
Interesting concept. That was 50 years ago. A modern temperature controlled solder pencil will just crank more power into the heating element to maintain temperature. So you won’t gain any element life, and in fact be shortening its life!

WA9PWP



Sent from Pauls iPhone

On Nov 22, 2020, at 10:03 PM, Jerome Wysocki <jeromewysocki48@gmail.com> wrote:

I remember an old trick reported in Popular Electronics in the earlier 1960s. The author would wrap some 14 gauge bare copper wire closely and tightly around the outside porcelain part of of the heating element of a soldering iron. He claimed the copper acted like a heat sink, to remove excess heat from the outside shell of the heating element, claiming that this will drastically increase the life of the heating element. Now that I am starting to do a lot more soldering than I have in recent years, I think I'll try it. It can't hurt.





Re: Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

Clark WU4B
 


Ron, 

Thanks for the two posts.  Woke up this morning and wondered if I had the BOM as a separate document as it is not in my copy of the manual.  Funny how I think better after a good night’s sleep!

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 12:23 AM AG1P Ron <ag1p@...> wrote:

Here’s what is in the BOM - 0.5” OD x 0.75” 10-32 Nylon Spacer

 

72 - Ron - AG1P

4SQRP Volunteer Webmaster

 

From: main@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:main@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Sent: Sunday, November 22, 2020 4:15 PM
To: main@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

 

Looks very much like a 1/4" nylon standoff

 

John K5MO

 

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 5:40 PM Thomas Martin <tem494@...> wrote:

You may want to check “thingverse” website 3D printing site look under Ham Radio someone may have one listed many talented people there.

 

Tom

On Sunday, November 22, 2020, Clark WU4B <clark.macaulay@...> wrote:

I'm building s/n 201 and do not have the coil form.  What is the diameter as I will have to fabricate one here.

Thanks for all your help
--
72,

Clark WU4B

--

--
72,

Clark WU4B


Re: Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

AG1P Ron
 

Here’s what is in the BOM - 0.5” OD x 0.75” 10-32 Nylon Spacer

 

72 - Ron - AG1P

4SQRP Volunteer Webmaster

 

From: main@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:main@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Sent: Sunday, November 22, 2020 4:15 PM
To: main@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

 

Looks very much like a 1/4" nylon standoff

 

John K5MO

 

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 5:40 PM Thomas Martin <tem494@...> wrote:

You may want to check “thingverse” website 3D printing site look under Ham Radio someone may have one listed many talented people there.

 

Tom

On Sunday, November 22, 2020, Clark WU4B <clark.macaulay@...> wrote:

I'm building s/n 201 and do not have the coil form.  What is the diameter as I will have to fabricate one here.

Thanks for all your help
--
72,

Clark WU4B


Re: Soldering Iron Temperature

Jerome Wysocki
 

I remember an old trick reported in Popular Electronics in the earlier 1960s. The author would wrap some 14 gauge bare copper wire closely and tightly around the outside porcelain part of of the heating element of a soldering iron. He claimed the copper acted like a heat sink, to remove excess heat from the outside shell of the heating element, claiming that this will drastically increase the life of the heating element. Now that I am starting to do a lot more soldering than I have in recent years, I think I'll try it. It can't hurt.


Re: Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

Curt
 

If you have any doubts email the designer NM0S for help.

I treasure my own Cyclone, best simple rig in my experience.

73 curt


Re: Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

John
 

Looks very much like a 1/4" nylon standoff

John K5MO


On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 5:40 PM Thomas Martin <tem494@...> wrote:
You may want to check “thingverse” website 3D printing site look under Ham Radio someone may have one listed many talented people there.

Tom

On Sunday, November 22, 2020, Clark WU4B <clark.macaulay@...> wrote:
I'm building s/n 201 and do not have the coil form.  What is the diameter as I will have to fabricate one here.

Thanks for all your help
--
72,

Clark WU4B


Re: Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

Thomas Martin
 

You may want to check “thingverse” website 3D printing site look under Ham Radio someone may have one listed many talented people there.

Tom


On Sunday, November 22, 2020, Clark WU4B <clark.macaulay@...> wrote:
I'm building s/n 201 and do not have the coil form.  What is the diameter as I will have to fabricate one here.

Thanks for all your help
--
72,

Clark WU4B


Cyclone 40 PTO Coil Form

Clark WU4B
 

I'm building s/n 201 and do not have the coil form.  What is the diameter as I will have to fabricate one here.

Thanks for all your help
--
72,

Clark WU4B


Re: Soldering Iron Temperature

Roy Parker
 

Actually it's more of a problem trying to use too cool of a temp. Strange, but it will heat the circuit more while trying to 'melt solder'.


On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 12:23 PM, WB9YZU via groups.io
<wb9yzu@...> wrote:
Woody, soldering is part art and part science, but like painting a car, the result is a matter of how well you prep the surface, keep your tools in good working order, and use the right tools. Lead heatsinks used to be a thing, especially when people used 15-25W single temp pencils for soldering, but most of what Hams run into now won't need them. Along with a Soldering Iron, a Tweezers,  small Hemostats, Dental Pick, and a set of small good quality dikes will be of help.

Once the board is prepped - I use IPA (Alcohol NOT the Beer!), 70-91% will work with the preference towards 91%. This can be obtained at your drug store.
Make sure your solder is either new or clean. I have some really old solder, and the surface oxidates. Wipe it with a rag with a bit of IPA on it to remove the oxidation or it will end up in your work. Speaking of solder, use the right size and type for what you want to do. Pb or Pb Free, and I prefer larger solder for PL259, and smaller solder for repairs and kits. I prefer a 60/40 Rosin core small diameter solder. If you want to use extra flux (and it is sometimes desirable) there are a number of brands of solder flux out there - they even make it in pen form. I'm still using the tin of Kesler stuff from 20 years ago (I should probably ditch it ;) ).

Iron choice - Don't even bother to buy a 25W iron. Seriously, just say No; don't even take one it someone gives it to you Free!
Because of the length of time it will take to heat, melt, an flow the solder, you will damage components and boards.
Like Paul mentioned, a 40-50W Pencil with adjustable temp will do most all kit building and rework. 
The Tip type depends on what you are using it for. Sometimes you may need a sharp tip, others a blade, and most generally a slightly blunt tip.
I can't stress enough the importance of keeping the tip clean and tinned! Whether you use the copper coil method or the damp sponge method is a matter of preference.

The actual soldering is the art, and it depends on what you are soldering.
For normal through board components, you apply the heat to the circuit pad, add solder to the pad until it flows onto the component, then add additional solder to create the fillet. If you have a dual sided board, you want to make sure it flows though to the other side. Don't dilly dally though, when the job is done, remove the heat and let it cool naturally. A 60/40 Pb solder fillet will be shinny when done right, Pb Free will look like a cold solder connection and there isn't any thing for it.

Connectors generally require more heat, and it depend what you are soldering. For example, for a PL259 male, a 125W Weller gun is often the appropriate tool, though if it is cold where I am working, I'm not apposed to pulling out the 250W Weller :) Again, timing is everything. Too long and you risk melting the insulation or the connector.

Soldering SMD is a horse of a different color.
It generally involves  1st tinning the pad with solder, placing the component on the pad, and reflowing the solder (ether with a pencil or a hot air tool) onto the component.
Your success with this method depends on prepwork and the size of the component. 
A Hot Air setup is useful for removing components and reinstalling them. They also work nicely to do heatshrink tubing :) Cheap ones are about $40 on Amazon.
This is a link to working with SMD components by KC9ON https://kc9on.com/ham-radio/smd/

Clean up - You want to board to look nice :)
I use IPA and a Q-Tip, for spot repairs. IPA and a tooth brush for larger items tends to get them clean.
FluxOff is a good product to use as a board wash.

Tons of informational material in YouTube videos!

GL!!

--
, Ron WB9YZU

661 - 680 of 23632