Date   

Re: Newsletter Editor

Dale Putnam
 

Super Jeremy,
  I'm sure that you will do a fine job, and there are lots of fellows that will help too. 
Thank you!!

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...; wa0itp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 12:18:11 -0500
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] Newsletter Editor

 

I honestly expected someone else to come out and jump all over taking over the banner!  I thought about volunteering when he first gave it up, but figured there’d be someone more active in the QRP scene than I am who would step forward.  I’d be willing to take it over, Terry!

 

Jeremy, NQ0M

In Beautiful downtown Iola, KS

 

From: 4sqrp@... [mailto:4sqrp@...]
Sent: Sunday, August 17, 2014 10:25 AM
To: 4sqrp@...
Subject: [4sqrp] Newsletter Editor

 

 

The Group still needs a NL editor to carry on the tradition started by Walter, K5EST.   Pse someone volunteer, prior exerience isnt required and help and content for articles pictures etc is readily available.  Newsletters are the glue that holds organizations together, and we're so spread out and diversified that we the newsletter plays an  important role for us..  They are appreciated and read by all 800+ members.

Shoot me a note, and Walter and I will help you get started.

Thanks vy much.
-- 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com



Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Sam Neal
 

Hello Phil,

Add me to the list!

Sam Neal N5AF
______________________________________________________

------ Original Message ------
Received: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 02:59:52 PM CDT
From: "Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@sunflower.com [4sqrp]"
<4sqrp@yahoogroups.com>
To: "4sqrp@yahoogroups.com" <4sqrp@yahoogroups.com>Cc: W0UK@yahoogroups.com,
Norman Mast <normanmast@gmail.com>, Matt May <matthewmay@kc.rr.com>, Phil
Anderson <aldenmcduffie@sunflower.com>
Subject: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an
interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30
WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the
conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long
shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries
about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and
I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such.

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30%
at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the
code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator
program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two
letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the
number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to
confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes a day most days, receiving a couple
of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are
required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc),
names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to
drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc.
I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the
top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen
for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a
contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.


---
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protection is active.
http://www.avast.com


Re: Newsletter Editor

Jeremy Utley
 

I honestly expected someone else to come out and jump all over taking over the banner!  I thought about volunteering when he first gave it up, but figured there’d be someone more active in the QRP scene than I am who would step forward.  I’d be willing to take it over, Terry!

 

Jeremy, NQ0M

In Beautiful downtown Iola, KS

 

From: 4sqrp@... [mailto:4sqrp@...]
Sent: Sunday, August 17, 2014 10:25 AM
To: 4sqrp@...
Subject: [4sqrp] Newsletter Editor

 

 

The Group still needs a NL editor to carry on the tradition started by Walter, K5EST.   Pse someone volunteer, prior exerience isnt required and help and content for articles pictures etc is readily available.  Newsletters are the glue that holds organizations together, and we're so spread out and diversified that we the newsletter plays an  important role for us..  They are appreciated and read by all 800+ members.

Shoot me a note, and Walter and I will help you get started.

Thanks vy much.

-- 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com


Re: Newsletter Editor

Phil Anderson
 

Terry, RE the Banner

I could promise to supply an article say once every other newsletter...........but hosting two
websites and the xtal set society newsletter right now......plus chair of the advisory board
for EE and CS at the University.......so better not take on editorship this year. Maybe next year.
Hope that helps,

UNC Phil, W0XI



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Newsletter Editor

WA0ITP
 

The Group still needs a NL editor to carry on the tradition started by Walter, K5EST.   Pse someone volunteer, prior exerience isnt required and help and content for articles pictures etc is readily available.  Newsletters are the glue that holds organizations together, and we're so spread out and diversified that we the newsletter plays an  important role for us..  They are appreciated and read by all 800+ members.

Shoot me a note, and Walter and I will help you get started.

Thanks vy much.
-- 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com


QQ

WA0ITP
 

Tim posted this on QRP-L today. Anyone want to write up something for him to include in his clubhouse column? Brutus is coming soon, some of us have been active in SOTA ops and other portable ops. Must be something we can send to him. He attends nearly every OzarkCon so it would be nice to support him.
TIA
--
72 WA�ITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com

-----Original Message-----
From: QRP-L [mailto:qrp-l-bounces@mailman.qth.net] On Behalf Of Timothy
Stabler via QRP-L
Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2014 12:47 PM
To:qrp-l@mailman.qth.net
Subject: [QRP-L] QRP Quarterly

I am looking for club news to write up for the Fall issue of QRP Quarterly.
Several clubs that used to send in stuff have not sent anything in for at
least a year. I am sure the clubs are still going. I need you input by
September 12th, please.

Also, now as editor of QQ, do you or your club have any project to write up
for QQ? We keep getting notes about wanting something simple and easier to
construct (and not cost a lot of money). Do you have anything or know of
anyhthing? If so, please get it to me or an associate editor (along with
jpeg photos).

The associate editors are:
JohnKing--w5ida@arrl.net

or:
DennisMarkell--dennis_m_markell@uhc.com

By the way, a lot of stuff to this address finds its way into trash. I am
closing this account, so please use:wb9nlz@comcast.net

Thanks for your input.

Tim
WB9NLZ
______________________________________________________________

--
72 WA�ITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

glene77is@...
 

--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
Great Morning to you. 
Check with your Oscope, on one of the square waves you can generate.
Feed this "square" wave through one of the audio filters you are developing.
After 1, 2, 3, 4, stages, you will have the remarkable "sine" wave in your ear !!! 
That is how I test my filters :  
I feed in a square wave, and watch the output from each stage.
#1 stage is always showing phase shifting towards a sine shape.  
#2, #3, #4 continue modifying the phase shape towards a pure sine wave. 
The third harmonic energy is shifted into 'sub-' and 'supra-' harmonics, 
and they meld into a "sine" wave. 
Observing the "square" wave modulate into the "sine" involves knowing what to see. 
Have fun with your many talents !
Glen Ellis, KK4LPG  --...  ...--   -..  .  -,-  -,-  ,,,,-  ,-,,  ,--, --,  


Re: DX on 20M

Dale Putnam
 

just worked RM4W on 14.032.. with 5 watts.. 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 15:14:51 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] DX on 20M

 
Europe is booming in on 20M.  I'm working them with the 2N2/20

Have fun

--
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com


2014 NJQRP Skeeter Hunt Log Summaries

Larry Makoski <w2lj@...>
 

So far, I have received Skeeter summaries from the following:

WD4EXI
N4EWT
W3ATB
WA1GWH
K4ARQ
NA3V
WD8RIF
WB8ENE
N0YET
N2JJF
KB1PBA
K1SWL
K4YND
KQ2RP
K0ALN
WA4PIG
K0RGI
VE3XT
K2ULR
N4KGL
WA8REI
AD4S
K4UPG
WI2W
N1LT
W1PID
K2WO
K2AL
WB3GCK
WH6LE
WD4MSM
NQ2W
K2TD
AB4QL
N1ABS
AI4SV
W3BBO
K3RLL
AB9CA
WV0H
K7TQ
W4MPS
WA0ITP
N0SS
KX0R

If you don't see your call there, I need to hear from you! Remember, log summaries are due NO LATER than 12:00 Midnight Saturday August 23/Sunday August 24. At that time, results are frozen and we will go with what has been received. Summaries follow this fictional example:

Larry - W2LJ - NJ
Skeeter #4 - All CW
Skeeter QSOs - 23
Non-Skeeter QSOs - 5
DX QSOs - (if any)
S/P/Cs - 18
Station Class Multiplier X4
"SKEETER" Bonus - 100 points (and here is where you would list the callsigns of the stations you worked that qualify you for the bonus points),

I'm trying to keep current with this and am composing the Sopabox now so I can post the results as quickly as I can after next weekend.

Thanks!

73 de Larry W2LJ
Skeeter #13


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Go catch HA9RT at 14011

Phil Anderson
 

Hey Terry, just heading out for dinner, darn..........

Just caught HA9RT at 14011 at 5NN, big signal. He
gave me 5NN too. Go get him!

Also had:
IK7FPU,
OH1VR,
S58MU,
LY25A,
LY50...................

nice later afternoon!

unc Phil



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Re: DX on 20M

WA0ITP
 

Now thats cool!

On 8/15/2014 4:19 PM, Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@... [4sqrp] wrote:
Thanks....we'll go get them.....

Worked Svalbard on the arctic circle last month..........wheeeeeee

Unc Phil

WA0ITP wa0itp@... [4sqrp] wrote:

Europe is booming in on 20M. I'm working them with the 2N2/20

Have fun

--
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com




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-- 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com


Re: DX on 20M

Phil Anderson
 

Thanks....we'll go get them.....

Worked Svalbard on the arctic circle last month..........wheeeeeee

Unc Phil

WA0ITP wa0itp@... [4sqrp] wrote:


Europe is booming in on 20M. I'm working them with the 2N2/20

Have fun

--
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com




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Re: test

Phil Anderson
 

You are looking good Terry, "test."

Uncle Phil




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DX on 20M

WA0ITP
 

Europe is booming in on 20M.  I'm working them with the 2N2/20

Have fun
-- 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com


test

WA0ITP
 

test
-- 
72 WAØITP
I love this radio stuff.
www.wa0itp.com
wa0itp@...
www.4sqrp.com


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

ae7us
 

Hi, Phil--add me to your list, and will be happy to read about your progress, methods and insights.  I'm on a similar journey at about the same level as you, using mostly bugs, but I also like paddles, sending via the keyboard as well as straight keys, and I'm looking forward to trying a Cootie, too.  

I like the site:  lcwo.net  which I believe is 2nd to none for anyone wanting to learn or improve his/her morse.

I'm considering starting a mailing list for people who are learning/improving their morse, so if you or anyone else is interested, let me know and i will shoot you an email if/when I begin taking subscriptions.

This mailing list will hopefully become a resource for all things morse

Also, there is Mumble Chat which gives people the chance to do CW over the Internet without having to worry about propagation.  More info can be had by going to the site:


All the best,

Rocky, AE7US




On Thu, Aug 14, 2014 at 12:59 PM, Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such. 

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes  a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
 in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.




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Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Dale Putnam
 

ok... that is a good idea.. 
Thank you, 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...; daleputnam@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 08:52:42 -0400
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Dale,

Put together a twin-T or a Wheatstone bridge oscillator for a pure sine wave.

73,
Don W3FPR


On 8/14/2014 7:05 PM, Dale Putnam daleputnam@... [4sqrp] wrote:
 

I'm looking for a keyed pure sine wave osc.. that I can key from the winkeyer.. and connect to my 2 M radio... 
for cw practice for the local fellows.. (they are a 2m club that isn't using the repeaters any longer...  can you say.. "fading away")
a bit of cw .. might help.. 
any suggestions?

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
CC: W0UK@...; normanmast@...; matthewmay@...; aldenmcduffie@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:59:39 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such. 

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes  a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
 in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.





This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.






Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Don Wilhelm <w3fpr@...>
 

Dale,

Put together a twin-T or a Wheatstone bridge oscillator for a pure sine wave.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 8/14/2014 7:05 PM, Dale Putnam daleputnam@... [4sqrp] wrote:
�

I'm looking for a keyed pure sine wave osc.. that I can key from the winkeyer.. and connect to my 2 M radio...�
for cw practice for the local fellows.. (they are a 2m club that isn't using the repeaters any longer... �can you say.. "fading away")
a bit of cw .. might help..�
any suggestions?

Have a great day,
�
�
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
�
�



To: 4sqrp@...
CC: W0UK@...; normanmast@...; matthewmay@...; aldenmcduffie@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:59:39 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

�
Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such.�

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes� a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
�in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.





This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.





Re: In Studying Morse Code................

W0IIT
 

Phil,

Put me on you code practice list, Please!!

cu es 72, Bart


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

W0IIT
 

Don,

Please put me on your list for cw practice. I am a cw and qrp only op, however, I have never done much rag chewing — much preferring short net check-ins or casual contest involvement. My goal, however, is to become comfortable in rag chew situations.

tia

cu es 72/73, Bart W0IIT

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