Date   

Re: RSS and XML feed services

email4utoo@...
 

Phil, for DX Maps , i use Mozzilla, there is a bar you can just paste it in below the address bar, and i retrieve it easily every day by clicking on it simply.  Keep up the Good Work, AJ W5heh


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

email4utoo@...
 

Phil, hope this is reaching you direct, i am interested in your list on improving my CW , , did not see the reply to sender link, or your email address, Thanks, AJ W5HEHmy address is this --    email4utoo at yayhoo do t  co m


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Dale Putnam
 

I used to run an hour of cw practice once a week, every week.. for over a year... never missed... until for a month, I asked around.. during and after the practice.. and at the club meetings.. if anyone had heard it.. and.. no one had.. after an extensive ad campaign...   so.. I spent that hour a week.. building.. and having a lot more fun. 
  And it looks like now that the local club is so dedicated to the ares/races/wx spotter routine.. that no one will listen or participate in the cw practice now...
so.. I will continue to run the cw practice net on 14.0625 at 2200z every Tues and Thurs.. and that will do just fine. 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:55:10 -0500
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 

...Dale, altho some (maybe you) look with distaste at CB in general,..It is hardly used now, some bootleg DX but not a lot these days,..My point is, Plenty of dead freq. space running maybe 3 or 5 watts, standard dipole or GP antenna, gets you all around town,..we (our group) plays and experiments there, and NO one bothers us,.. see ya



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:43:42 -0500
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 


...Dale you are 100% correct on 10 meters for cross town work,..several local guys and myself use converted CB rigs on 10,..old thing to do but still works fine..keeps repeater gang out of your business,..dont have to be on ARRL band plan,..FCC sez fone is started at 28.300...we run AM often...see ya



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 21:35:06 -0600
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 

You are 100% correct.. except these fellows don't have any 10m... 
and not a lotta interest either.. what they do is digi.. and weather... with digi..
no cw.. no ssb.. no hf...   and a whole lotta history to support them.. and a lotta repeaters too. 
but.. no fun.. so they fade.. and eventually will fade.. 
unfortunate.. but.. that is the path.. and I can't give up on them.. yet. 
not until the last one is gone. 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:11:16 -0700
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Techs can do CW on 10m with ground waves and then dial up a little and discuss the problems on SSB. That way you don't burn a repeater out running at 100%,
72 de Scott/n7net





Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Robert Rode <renegadechemist@...>
 

...as in modulated CW practice..



From: renegadechemist@...
To: 4sqrp@...
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:55:10 -0500

...Dale, altho some (maybe you) look with distaste at CB in general,..It is hardly used now, some bootleg DX but not a lot these days,..My point is, Plenty of dead freq. space running maybe 3 or 5 watts, standard dipole or GP antenna, gets you all around town,..we (our group) plays and experiments there, and NO one bothers us,.. see ya



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:43:42 -0500
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 


...Dale you are 100% correct on 10 meters for cross town work,..several local guys and myself use converted CB rigs on 10,..old thing to do but still works fine..keeps repeater gang out of your business,..dont have to be on ARRL band plan,..FCC sez fone is started at 28.300...we run AM often...see ya



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 21:35:06 -0600
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 

You are 100% correct.. except these fellows don't have any 10m... 
and not a lotta interest either.. what they do is digi.. and weather... with digi..
no cw.. no ssb.. no hf...   and a whole lotta history to support them.. and a lotta repeaters too. 
but.. no fun.. so they fade.. and eventually will fade.. 
unfortunate.. but.. that is the path.. and I can't give up on them.. yet. 
not until the last one is gone. 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:11:16 -0700
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Techs can do CW on 10m with ground waves and then dial up a little and discuss the problems on SSB. That way you don't burn a repeater out running at 100%,
72 de Scott/n7net




Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Robert Rode <renegadechemist@...>
 

...Dale, altho some (maybe you) look with distaste at CB in general,..It is hardly used now, some bootleg DX but not a lot these days,..My point is, Plenty of dead freq. space running maybe 3 or 5 watts, standard dipole or GP antenna, gets you all around town,..we (our group) plays and experiments there, and NO one bothers us,.. see ya



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:43:42 -0500
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 


...Dale you are 100% correct on 10 meters for cross town work,..several local guys and myself use converted CB rigs on 10,..old thing to do but still works fine..keeps repeater gang out of your business,..dont have to be on ARRL band plan,..FCC sez fone is started at 28.300...we run AM often...see ya



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 21:35:06 -0600
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 

You are 100% correct.. except these fellows don't have any 10m... 
and not a lotta interest either.. what they do is digi.. and weather... with digi..
no cw.. no ssb.. no hf...   and a whole lotta history to support them.. and a lotta repeaters too. 
but.. no fun.. so they fade.. and eventually will fade.. 
unfortunate.. but.. that is the path.. and I can't give up on them.. yet. 
not until the last one is gone. 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:11:16 -0700
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Techs can do CW on 10m with ground waves and then dial up a little and discuss the problems on SSB. That way you don't burn a repeater out running at 100%,
72 de Scott/n7net




Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Robert Rode <renegadechemist@...>
 


...Dale you are 100% correct on 10 meters for cross town work,..several local guys and myself use converted CB rigs on 10,..old thing to do but still works fine..keeps repeater gang out of your business,..dont have to be on ARRL band plan,..FCC sez fone is started at 28.300...we run AM often...see ya



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 21:35:06 -0600
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 

You are 100% correct.. except these fellows don't have any 10m... 
and not a lotta interest either.. what they do is digi.. and weather... with digi..
no cw.. no ssb.. no hf...   and a whole lotta history to support them.. and a lotta repeaters too. 
but.. no fun.. so they fade.. and eventually will fade.. 
unfortunate.. but.. that is the path.. and I can't give up on them.. yet. 
not until the last one is gone. 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:11:16 -0700
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Techs can do CW on 10m with ground waves and then dial up a little and discuss the problems on SSB. That way you don't burn a repeater out running at 100%,
72 de Scott/n7net



Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Dale Putnam
 

You are 100% correct.. except these fellows don't have any 10m... 
and not a lotta interest either.. what they do is digi.. and weather... with digi..
no cw.. no ssb.. no hf...   and a whole lotta history to support them.. and a lotta repeaters too. 
but.. no fun.. so they fade.. and eventually will fade.. 
unfortunate.. but.. that is the path.. and I can't give up on them.. yet. 
not until the last one is gone. 

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:11:16 -0700
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Techs can do CW on 10m with ground waves and then dial up a little and discuss the problems on SSB. That way you don't burn a repeater out running at 100%,
72 de Scott/n7net


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Scott ..
 

Techs can do CW on 10m with ground waves and then dial up a little and discuss the problems on SSB. That way you don't burn a repeater out running at 100%,
72 de Scott/n7net


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Dale Putnam
 

Hi Chris,
  I had a commodore 64 I did that with.. 
but that's long gone.. now I need the software to do that with... or a suggestion about what to use...
and yes.. the time out will be tricky too.. and keying the radio.. it would be best to do it on HF.. but 
most of the club is on 2.. and don't have HF.. ... if I get my hopes granted.. that will only be a temp situation.. 
Thank you, I'll check out K7QO.. 


Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 


> To: 4sqrp@...; daleputnam@...
> CC: w0uk@...; normanmast@...; matthewmay@...; aldenmcduffie@...
> From: 4sqrp@...
> Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:35:52 -0500
> Subject: Re: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................
>
>
> Hi Dale,
>
> I ran a CW training net on the local repeater for awhile when I lived in Colorado.
>
> I used k7qo's mp3 files that I downloaded online and ran them through a
> computer/radio audio interface. I did the T/R switching by hand.
> The only tricky part was breaking the transmission every 2 minutes
> to avoid timing out the repeater.
>
> I think I also had a program that would let me key by hand but it's been
> awhile ago and I don't remember for sure.
>
> Chris
> w0ep
>
>


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Chris Howard w0ep
 

Hi Dale,

I ran a CW training net on the local repeater for awhile when I lived in Colorado.

I used k7qo's mp3 files that I downloaded online and ran them through a
computer/radio audio interface. I did the T/R switching by hand.
The only tricky part was breaking the transmission every 2 minutes
to avoid timing out the repeater.

I think I also had a program that would let me key by hand but it's been
awhile ago and I don't remember for sure.

Chris
w0ep

On 8/14/2014 6:05 PM, Dale Putnam daleputnam@hotmail.com [4sqrp] wrote:


I'm looking for a keyed pure sine wave osc.. that I can key from the winkeyer.. and connect to my 2 M radio...
for cw practice for the local fellows.. (they are a 2m club that isn't using the repeaters any longer... can you say.. "fading away")
a bit of cw .. might help..
any suggestions?

Have a great day,


--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: 4sqrp@yahoogroups.com
CC: W0UK@yahoogroups.com; normanmast@gmail.com; matthewmay@kc.rr.com; aldenmcduffie@sunflower.com
From: 4sqrp@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:59:39 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................


Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such.

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com <http://www.4qrp.com>;.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus <http://www.avast.com/>; protection is active.




Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Scott ..
 

Don,
One of the huge plus for my use of code is being able build some QRP stuff. It's a great experience to hear something work that I fabricated with my own two hands.
72 de Scott/n7net


Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Dale Putnam
 

I'm looking for a keyed pure sine wave osc.. that I can key from the winkeyer.. and connect to my 2 M radio... 
for cw practice for the local fellows.. (they are a 2m club that isn't using the repeaters any longer...  can you say.. "fading away")
a bit of cw .. might help.. 
any suggestions?

Have a great day,
 
 
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy
 
 



To: 4sqrp@...
CC: W0UK@...; normanmast@...; matthewmay@...; aldenmcduffie@...
From: 4sqrp@...
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:59:39 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 
Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such. 

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes  a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
 in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.





This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.




Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Don Wilhelm <w3fpr@...>
 

For work on call signs, try RufzXP by DL4MM.  It adjusts the speed to your responses.  Sends 50 callsigns in each session.  See http://www.rufzxp.net.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 8/14/2014 3:59 PM, Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@... [4sqrp] wrote:
 

Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such. 

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes  a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................




Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Harold Hall
 

Hello Phil,

Keep up the good work, please put me on your list.  

Harold Hall
WB5KZO


On Thu, Aug 14, 2014 at 4:24 PM, Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

Hi Carlie,

Yup, remember my testing at the Federal building in KC. Took General, ADV, and Extra all
in one sitting. The examiner was more tired than me. Hi. That was years ago.

Do yo want me to add you to the CODE CIRCLE  email list?

73, Unc Phil......(also age 73, hi)








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Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Phil Anderson
 

Hi Carlie,

Yup, remember my testing at the Federal building in KC. Took General, ADV, and Extra all
in one sitting. The examiner was more tired than me. Hi. That was years ago.

Do yo want me to add you to the CODE CIRCLE  email list?

73, Unc Phil......(also age 73, hi)






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Re: In Studying Morse Code................

Charlie Vest
 

What breaks any rhythm, if I happen to have one going on at the time, especially in a contest, is cut numbers. They still don't fit into "my" type of CW and I don't think that they ever will.

This brings up another point, related to CW and phone both. Why do ANY of the contests especially, and now even most day to day contacts, even require you to do a signal report ? I am lucky to get one or two a year HONEST AND TRUE signal reports. Doing away with it would allow for more contacts over a long period of contesting. It is actually to the point, in my own personal opinion, that it should be completely eliminated, from especially contests. A lot of operators do not even know what the letters RST even stand for.

Naturally many of us who built and bought the very first computers, CW was a program that most of us wrote some form or version of. In the beginning only the local college and I owned the first Radio Shack computers. The college had two and I had just one.

I think it was after I upgraded to one of the powerful computers, a HIGHLY modified VIC 20, I wrote a CW program to help the local guys learn the code. I ended up with several versions, since I was still just playing and learning programming. I did write one that also included static crashes and other random white type noises. May have been after I went to the Commodore 64 or my first IBM with dual 360 K floppy drives, that I wrote a program that had the noise and some other CW "stations" to add a little distraction and to also provide more realistic on the air operating experience. These were for General and above study work to prepare for the FCC exams.

I'll never forget my 13 WPM test before the FCC in Tulsa, at the quarterly examining point. Some very unusual and stressful events happened, that I won't go into. You had better have studied your numbers VERY well !!! I'll never forget, that they were sending the latitude and longitude of a sinking ship, along with other things like number of passengers, etc. VERY minimal letter text, but LOTS of numbers. VERY HAPPILY I PASSED !!! The examiner after I did my sending for him , told me I could expect my upgraded license in about 12 weeks. As I remember he was pretty accurate. The waiting was just as difficult or maybe even more difficult than the testing.

Charlie, W5COV


On 8/14/2014 2:59 PM, Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@... [4sqrp] wrote:
 

Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such. 

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes  a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
 in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.




This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.






This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.



Re: In Studying Morse Code................

James Compton
 

Hi Phil,

Congrats on your willpower I've been wanting to "get started" at learning code for over 60 years (off and on).  I either don't have enough motivation, tenacity, or initiative to keep at it after several fitful starts.  Keep me posted on your progress.  
Good luck!
72
Jim Compton, K4JDC

-----Original Message-----
From: "Phil Anderson aldenmcduffie@... [4sqrp]" <4sqrp@...>
Sent: Aug 14, 2014 3:59 PM
To: "4sqrp@..." <4sqrp@...>
Cc: W0UK@..., Norman Mast , Matt May , Phil Anderson
Subject: [4sqrp] In Studying Morse Code................

 

Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such. 

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes  a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
 in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.




This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.



In Studying Morse Code................

Phil Anderson
 

Hey All,

I'm continuing to study Morse Code as a language. I find it an interesting subject.
My end goal ~ maybe ~ is to improve my sending and reception up to 30 WPM and
be able comprehend rag chew reception at 90%, i.e. understand the conversation
without writing down what I'm receiving. I'm NOT nearly there by a long shot so far.
If you are so inclined too and wish to receive my frequent summaries about what
I've found info wise or what I've found that works for me, email me and I'll put you on my
outgoing email list on such. 

Example: Practicing Receiving Call Signs:

I'm now solid at 20 WPM on 90% of them, decent at 25 but less than 30% at 30.
Of course, listening on the air - given noise, RST, and quality of the code from
the other end is not as easy; but we have to start somewhere.
Here's what I've found that works for me so far:

@ 20 WPM (don't practice any slower!), I use a call sign generator program (NuMorse)
1. First relax; don't hold your breath,
2. Concentrate after the "de" if receiving off the air on the first two letters that follow,
write them down as you receive them if you wish and then listen for the number.
3. I write down the number as I'm listing for the last 1, 2 or 3 letters.
4. I then say the full call out loud; and then, look at the screen to confirm.
5. I practice for 15 to 20 minutes  a day most days, receiving a couple of pages of them.
6. It was tough at first but came along faster than I thought it would.
7. Some other technique might work better for you.................

When receiving on the air signals, it is clear that different skills are required for different
parts of the QSO: callsigns, RST numbers, abbreviations (e.g. QTH etc), names, and common
exchanges (like WX, RIG, ANT). As such, I've found that it helps to drill on each of these types.
For example, drill on sets of numbers, sets of common QSO words, etc. I've published
the top 100 common words on the resources page at www.4qrp.com.

I found it really helped me on rig names to listen to the names for the top six brands using
my NuMorse program using a text file. Example. KNWD, YEASU, ICOM, RX3, ETC.
I practice these names at random at 30 to 40 words per minute. I listen for the whole
word and then say it. Same for antenna names: dipole, yagi, etc.

A big part of reception is preparation. For example if you are working a contest,
read up on the exchange ahead of time, perhaps at:
http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php
and practice a bit with it. I find it easier then
since I know what to expect, example. 55N, GA, NR 0012.

Accurate anticipation really makes the reception easier!

More detail next time.

Unc Phil, W0XI

PS: English is much worse:
How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?
You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
 in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which,
an alarm goes off by going on.




This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.



Semi-Auto (Bug) key Dot Stabilizer Update

Jim Sheldon
 

Bug Dot Stabilizer, August 2014 update:

I currently make "Dot Stabilizers" (a T.R. McElroy invention from the 1930's - see www.artifaxbooks.com/dotstabilizer.htm for history & theory) for the Vibroplex, Speed-X and McElroy keys having the round pendulum and bugs with the flat pendulum, such as the Vibroplex Lightning Bug, Champion and WW2 military J-36 bugs (including the Lionel models) which are based on the Lightning Bug design. I can customize them for other bugs such as the Japanese Hi Mound ("Coffin") bug, European made (metric sizes) bugs, etc. as long as you can supply me with the diameter (round) or thickness (flat) of the pendulum and a sharply focused digital photo of the actual bug you want it for. There is no extra charge for this customization as it stands right now.
 
They can be made out of either aluminum or brass. They mount to the arm with a socket head set screw and the proper Allen wrench is included along with a printed set of instructions explaining installation and proper adjustment. Also, they are made entirely by hand so there may be slight differences between each one (won't affect the operation at all). I recommend the aluminum ones as they are lighter and don't affect the top speed of the bug as much as the brass ones do.
 
The prices are $20 post paid for the aluminum and $25 for the brass ones to U.S. customers. I was charging $20 for either aluminum or brass, but I've run out of surplus brass and had to buy some at current new brass prices which are considerably higher than what I had to pay for the surplus stock.  Internationally, they are $35 for Aluminum and $40 (U.S. Funds) for the brass ones.  They will be sent "International First Class" mail. 
 
If you decide to order one or more, I will need the make/model of the bug(s) you want stabilizers for, whether they are "left" or "right" handed (the bug, not you) and be sure to include your mailing address as well.
The preferred method of payment is Pay Pal and my PP address is:   w0eb@... .  For International customers I'll only accept payment by PayPal.  I will take personal checks or USPS money orders from U.S. domestic customers, made out to Aubrey J. Sheldon,  sent to my QRZ mailing address. 
 
I'll be happy to answer any further questions you may have.
 
Jim Sheldon - W0EB
2029 East Evanston Dr.
Park City, KS 67219-1618


Wed. night PSK checkins

Dick Hammond
 

AC0WZ   Dan, Fulton, MO
K6QKL  Chuck, Fairview Ht. IL (ghost)
KA0KRN David, Ottumwa, IA
Band was good in my location.
Not many on,tnx fer checkins.
N0TGR  Dick, Augusta, KS  NCS

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