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On Air Operating


Gary KF7WNS
 

I have a question: 
What frequency is being used on 160M? 1813.5 and 1835 are being used by SKCC  - 1816 is popular with PWN QRP guys - 1810 and 1820 are also popular with QRP groups. Do the 4SQRP members have a favorite hangout? 
Propagation is really favoring lower bands. Last night I got better spots on 160 than I did on 80. That gives me some encouragement during this period in our solar cycle.

Gary/KF7WNS


Carl Gansen
 

Hello Gary,

I tend to avoid integer value frequencies like 1810 Khz, 1813 Khz...  In this day of digital dials, settling on an integer value
increases the chance that someone will inform you that you are on THEIR frequency, or have someone tune up over you
or call CQ on top of you.  With the exception of QRP guys or contesters, it seems everybody else has gone to 1 Khz channels.
My efforts seem to be more fruitful using frequencies like 1811.65 or 1811.35 or some such value...Being far enough from the 
1 Khz "channels" that my selectivity can ignore them, yet carry on a QSO.  The region from 1811 to 1814 has been good QRP
calling area for me. 

73
Carl WB0CFF


Gary KF7WNS
 

Thanks Carl, good to have a bit narrower spectrum to search for those elusive QRP signals in. I'll keep an eye on 1811-1814.
Last night on 80, I called QRL four times before I called CQ and finished with a string of dits on top of me. So I moved up two and tried over again fully expecting that that was his frequency too.

72
Gary/KF7WNS

On Mon, Jan 14, 2019 at 5:49 PM Carl Gansen <wb0cff@...> wrote:
Hello Gary,

I tend to avoid integer value frequencies like 1810 Khz, 1813 Khz...  In this day of digital dials, settling on an integer value
increases the chance that someone will inform you that you are on THEIR frequency, or have someone tune up over you
or call CQ on top of you.  With the exception of QRP guys or contesters, it seems everybody else has gone to 1 Khz channels.
My efforts seem to be more fruitful using frequencies like 1811.65 or 1811.35 or some such value...Being far enough from the 
1 Khz "channels" that my selectivity can ignore them, yet carry on a QSO.  The region from 1811 to 1814 has been good QRP
calling area for me. 

73
Carl WB0CFF


Carl Gansen
 

I know my view might be an over-simplification but in general QRP sucess is dependant on NOT getting run
over by big signals, and moving around and listening. Avoiding the 1 Khz "channels" tends to put you in a place
that others don't use and in a place where those tuning/listening for weaker signals are more likely to find you.
QRP enthusiasts, like the 4 States group, the Flying Pigs...  seem to understand this  very well and it is part of
why I enjoy participating in their events.

I offer, as a bit of evidence, for the 1 Khz channel theory, is that I routinely call CQ in between integer Khz frequencies
and I fairly often get a reply way off frequency and if I check, it's on the nearest whole Khz.  In a few cases, the replying
station told me that I was off frequency. 

It is an interesting phenomenom to me. Maybe, it's my early novice days where I'd call CQ and look +/- as much as
10 Khz for a reply because, back then,  we  novices were all rockbound.  I was anxious for the day that I upgraded and
could spin a big knob on my radio and move to another frequency and not be stuck on a "channel" defined by the few
precious crystals I could afford as a kid.

72
Carl WB0CFF


hamhog1
 

Carl,

The reference to the novice days brought back some wonderful memories.  Got my novice 61 years ago this spring.  Enjoying the 4sqrp group.

73,
Gary K4VIG


Carl Gansen
 

Hello Gary, K4VIG

It was nice to briefly meet you Sunday night.  I hope we can cross paths and have a chat some night.
I'm often ragchewing on 80M (mostly) or 160M in the evenings.

I know what you mean about novice days, but as good as my novice memories were, it takes nothing
from the fun I am having now.

Carl - WB0CFF