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40 and 80 meter net report

Johnny Matlock
 

Well here are the results!

40 meters was apparently long and extremely quite tonight.
Kind of reminds of last nights Fox hunt.

1 Check in on 40:
N4KV John

80 meters was better:
WA9PWP PAUL
W2SH CHAS
N4KV JOHN
N0YJ BERT
and
WB1GYZ ( i think that was the call) qsb was terrible.

Tnx everyone for the chek in's
Hope to Cu next week!
Johnny AC0BQ


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QRP....."More smiles per Watt"
72
JOHNNY AC0BQ ..

Fernan Bolando
 

hi all

i'm still unfamiliar with most ham radio lingo.

when somebody says "40m is long", it means the signal hop is long?

regards
fernan ve4feb

Charles W. Powell
 

Yes, Fernan, that is exactly what it means. Depending on the time of day and the ionospheric conditions, 40 meters can be short - conducive to hops ranging from a few miles to a few hundred miles, or thousands of miles. So when 40 meters is “long” you are more likely to have contacts of 1000 miles (1600 km) or more and less likely to be able to work a station 100-200 miles (160 to 320 km) away. 80 meters can behave exactly the same way. One night I was hearing absolutely nothing on 80 meters, except one station mid-band. It was Western Sahara, and I worked him with 5 watts on 80m. That is unusual, but it certainly happens.

72,

Chas - NK8O
VE3ISD
5H3DX

On Nov 20, 2019, at 9:05 AM, Fernan Bolando <ve4feb@...> wrote:

hi all

i'm still unfamiliar with most ham radio lingo.

when somebody says "40m is long", it means the signal hop is long?

regards
fernan ve4feb


Fernan Bolando
 

thanks Charles

regards
fernan ve4feb

Johnny Matlock
 


You got it.
6-800 miles or more?
California was 1200 miles last night.
73
Johnny 


On Wed, Nov 20, 2019 at 9:05 AM Fernan Bolando <ve4feb@...> wrote:
hi all

i'm still unfamiliar with most ham radio lingo.

when somebody says "40m is long", it means the signal hop is long?

regards
fernan ve4feb



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