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Fire In The Wire

K0WDO Will Osborn
 

Thanks for the idea Bob W9RAN !

I purchased the 31 ft jackite pole & mounted it insulated from, and 2 ft above my 900 ft long chain link fence. The 12 ga wire radiator is taped up the jackite pole & is a total of 33 ft in length. At the bottom I use a 4:1 unun with ground/radial lug bonded to the fence top rail & tension wire. Picture attached.

To my surprise it has worked gang busters and the tuner in shack has no problem with 10-40 meters since the SWR is fairly low already. 80 meters is doable but is understandably inefficient. When I get motivated I’ll put out some radials but for now this is a perfect Summertime antenna that’s easy to mow around once I bury the coax.

I added a few Dacron guys and it survived some crazy Kansas wind the past 2 weeks.

73 and thanks again for the great ideas and shared knowledge in this group. I hope you are all healthy.
Will
K0WDO

On Mar 14, 2020, at 4:23 PM, w9ran <w9ran@...> wrote:

On 3/14/2020 2:32 PM, Joshua Wood wrote:
any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)
Well I didn't believe it when a mil radio buddy who does a lot of portable operation first told me, but after giving it a try I am a firm believer that it's very hard to beat a 31 ft. telescoping fiberglass Jackite (kite) pole with a wire run up the center, a small autotuner like an SGC-235, and three or four 30 ft. long counterpoise wires. There are many ways to hold it up including a drive-over base and the kind of "quad pod" used for highway signs, or light paracord guy wires. Mine fastens to the back of my RV and I can have it up and be on the air in 5 minutes. With a little ingenuity a mount can be figured-out for any kind of operation and some radios with built-in tuners will match it directly.

Vertical real estate is usually easier to find than horizontal, and no natural or manmade supports are needed so you can set up on pavement, bare rock, or any surface. The antenna is a quarter wave on 40 and easily tunes to the higher bands and as low as 80 meters, and signal reports are consistently "as good as your home station". Jackite poles collapse down to 46 inches and even have a place to wind up the antenna wire for storage. Tie a big fishing sinker on each counterpoise wire and attach them with alligator clips so when (not "if") you trip over them they won't kill you. The best part is the 31 ft pole will cost about $80 and the rest is just wire and hardware store parts (conduit hangers fit perfectly).

So many hams have used them for antennas that Jackite has added an "antennas" page to their website: https://www.jackite.com/antenna

By they way some have used them as permanent antennas - just wrap a few turns of electrical tape above each joint so it can't work loose with temperature cycling.

73, Bob W9RAN



wynger99@yahoo.com
 

Sounds like great stuff to me....  I would have been talking to you about your "miracle antenna".....  I was thinking that would make a good "Mini" podcast to help replace our loss of Ozarkcon..Maybe Tinker John could do another one and or any of the other presenters as well..   Just some thoughts from an old ham. 

73"s  Dale WN0WWY


On Thursday, March 19, 2020, 7:53:04 PM CDT, John <ve3ips@...> wrote:



Josh

I love that

Can you write a one page or 2 for the Qrp Quarterly magazine right away so we can publish your awesome ideas?

On Thu, Mar 19, 2020 at 8:50 PM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Wanted to reply that I've tried most of the ideas out there.  I've recently got a NanoVNA to do a bit better evaluations than my diode based swr analyzers.  I've had tons of fun trying stuff, and was going take what I call my "antenna erector set" to show at Ozarkcons display table (4:1 voltage balun, 1:1 balun, common mode choke, 9:1 unun, line spacers, end insulators, etc).  I'd like to think I'm searching for the miracle antenna - but I'm fully aware it doesn't exist.  I has hoping someone else had found it!  ^.^

-Josh
W0ODJ 

--
Sent with a Palm Pilot. Ve3ips.wordpress.com
Radio: it's not just a hobby, it's a way of life
All content is personal and confidential

John
 


Josh

I love that

Can you write a one page or 2 for the Qrp Quarterly magazine right away so we can publish your awesome ideas?


On Thu, Mar 19, 2020 at 8:50 PM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Wanted to reply that I've tried most of the ideas out there.  I've recently got a NanoVNA to do a bit better evaluations than my diode based swr analyzers.  I've had tons of fun trying stuff, and was going take what I call my "antenna erector set" to show at Ozarkcons display table (4:1 voltage balun, 1:1 balun, common mode choke, 9:1 unun, line spacers, end insulators, etc).  I'd like to think I'm searching for the miracle antenna - but I'm fully aware it doesn't exist.  I has hoping someone else had found it!  ^.^

-Josh
W0ODJ 

--
Sent with a Palm Pilot. Ve3ips.wordpress.com
Radio: it's not just a hobby, it's a way of life
All content is personal and confidential

Joshua Wood
 

Wanted to reply that I've tried most of the ideas out there.  I've recently got a NanoVNA to do a bit better evaluations than my diode based swr analyzers.  I've had tons of fun trying stuff, and was going take what I call my "antenna erector set" to show at Ozarkcons display table (4:1 voltage balun, 1:1 balun, common mode choke, 9:1 unun, line spacers, end insulators, etc).  I'd like to think I'm searching for the miracle antenna - but I'm fully aware it doesn't exist.  I has hoping someone else had found it!  ^.^

-Josh
W0ODJ 

Curt
 

I have had good luck with 1-5W on 20M with 34' wire up in a tree tuned with a KI6J Tuner that predated the Sota tuner.  Use it from my patio when weather n bugs permit,  Used it portable from Northern Ontario a decade ago with an ATS-3 @ 1W, made lot of contacts into all parts of the US from inside a cabin as the bugs never allowed outside.

My 2 cents.

Curt KB5JO

Jim Upson
 

Check out this site....FANTASTIC insight on building a Type 43 transformer....


especially go to the first link on page 1 From the above link.....here it is just to emphasize it....



73, Jim / AC3B 


On Wed, Mar 18, 2020 at 11:00 AM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Thank you all for your ideas and recommendations,  in this thread and all the splintered ones, private and public!  My wife had minor sinus surgery, and I work in a hospital,  so I've been a bit preoccupied.   I'm definitely going to go through the responses as soon as I  can!

-Josh
W0ODJ 

On Mon, Mar 16, 2020, 14:10 Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:
From the consensus here, I think I'll make myself another full-sized W3EDP End-fed and try that next time I go operate at the park. It'll have to be when the parks are actually OPEN again, as the recent COVID-19 quarantine effort has caused them all to be closed, at least in my neck of the woods. That's literally...one of the parks in question is a humongous farm with big wooded areas here and there with trails throughout it. It's called the Norristown Farm Park, KFF-4363, and it's my favorite since it's only a mile or so from me. One of the side parking lots has a couple of handicapped spaces my van will fit into, and has a picnic table under a small shelter just 50-75 feet from the parking lot, so I can roll my little flat roller cart over there from my van and set up. There's plenty of room, a flat, grassy area, that I usually use for my wire antennas next to the table, so I set up my antenna, then set up the station under the shelter, and begin operating. The only end-fed I've used there so far is the SOTABeams end-fed with the built-in 20/30/40 tuner, and that works reasonably well. But I may just try a W3EDP this spring with my Elecraft T1 tuner and see what results I get.

I've got other experiments on the burner as well, including a dipole made of electric fence strap -- 15 parallel stainless-steel wires woven lengthwise into a 2" wide strap of poly webbing. It's used to make some fantastically wide-bandwidth single band dipoles, so I want to see if I can make a fan dipole using the stuff. There may be too much coupling between the wires, but it's worth a try. It might just need a lot of trimming to overcome the coupling. If that's the case, I may be able to make a decent multi-band fan dipole that's simpler to erect. I'd model it, but frankly, I don't yet know how to use the modeling software. I've got several programs, but they're so much Greek to me! hi hi

73
Gwen, NG3P

On Mon, Mar 16, 2020 at 2:38 PM Tim N9PUZ <tim.n9puz@...> wrote:
I am a big fan of end fed antennas for portable use as well. Even when I
am in a wooded area I usually use my 31' or 28' Jackite pole as a
support. I attach the wire to the tip, extend the mast to its full
height, and then just let it lean into a tree.

Tim N9PUZ

On 3/16/2020 10:36 AM, Nick Kennedy wrote:
> Getting back to the original poster - I like the EFHW for field
> operations because it only needs one support. I'm a total klutz when
> it comes to getting lines through trees. I also like the Jackite pole
> (31') as a support.






--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net

Joshua Wood
 

Thank you all for your ideas and recommendations,  in this thread and all the splintered ones, private and public!  My wife had minor sinus surgery, and I work in a hospital,  so I've been a bit preoccupied.   I'm definitely going to go through the responses as soon as I  can!

-Josh
W0ODJ 

On Mon, Mar 16, 2020, 14:10 Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:
From the consensus here, I think I'll make myself another full-sized W3EDP End-fed and try that next time I go operate at the park. It'll have to be when the parks are actually OPEN again, as the recent COVID-19 quarantine effort has caused them all to be closed, at least in my neck of the woods. That's literally...one of the parks in question is a humongous farm with big wooded areas here and there with trails throughout it. It's called the Norristown Farm Park, KFF-4363, and it's my favorite since it's only a mile or so from me. One of the side parking lots has a couple of handicapped spaces my van will fit into, and has a picnic table under a small shelter just 50-75 feet from the parking lot, so I can roll my little flat roller cart over there from my van and set up. There's plenty of room, a flat, grassy area, that I usually use for my wire antennas next to the table, so I set up my antenna, then set up the station under the shelter, and begin operating. The only end-fed I've used there so far is the SOTABeams end-fed with the built-in 20/30/40 tuner, and that works reasonably well. But I may just try a W3EDP this spring with my Elecraft T1 tuner and see what results I get.

I've got other experiments on the burner as well, including a dipole made of electric fence strap -- 15 parallel stainless-steel wires woven lengthwise into a 2" wide strap of poly webbing. It's used to make some fantastically wide-bandwidth single band dipoles, so I want to see if I can make a fan dipole using the stuff. There may be too much coupling between the wires, but it's worth a try. It might just need a lot of trimming to overcome the coupling. If that's the case, I may be able to make a decent multi-band fan dipole that's simpler to erect. I'd model it, but frankly, I don't yet know how to use the modeling software. I've got several programs, but they're so much Greek to me! hi hi

73
Gwen, NG3P

On Mon, Mar 16, 2020 at 2:38 PM Tim N9PUZ <tim.n9puz@...> wrote:
I am a big fan of end fed antennas for portable use as well. Even when I
am in a wooded area I usually use my 31' or 28' Jackite pole as a
support. I attach the wire to the tip, extend the mast to its full
height, and then just let it lean into a tree.

Tim N9PUZ

On 3/16/2020 10:36 AM, Nick Kennedy wrote:
> Getting back to the original poster - I like the EFHW for field
> operations because it only needs one support. I'm a total klutz when
> it comes to getting lines through trees. I also like the Jackite pole
> (31') as a support.






--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net

Gwen Patton
 

From the consensus here, I think I'll make myself another full-sized W3EDP End-fed and try that next time I go operate at the park. It'll have to be when the parks are actually OPEN again, as the recent COVID-19 quarantine effort has caused them all to be closed, at least in my neck of the woods. That's literally...one of the parks in question is a humongous farm with big wooded areas here and there with trails throughout it. It's called the Norristown Farm Park, KFF-4363, and it's my favorite since it's only a mile or so from me. One of the side parking lots has a couple of handicapped spaces my van will fit into, and has a picnic table under a small shelter just 50-75 feet from the parking lot, so I can roll my little flat roller cart over there from my van and set up. There's plenty of room, a flat, grassy area, that I usually use for my wire antennas next to the table, so I set up my antenna, then set up the station under the shelter, and begin operating. The only end-fed I've used there so far is the SOTABeams end-fed with the built-in 20/30/40 tuner, and that works reasonably well. But I may just try a W3EDP this spring with my Elecraft T1 tuner and see what results I get.

I've got other experiments on the burner as well, including a dipole made of electric fence strap -- 15 parallel stainless-steel wires woven lengthwise into a 2" wide strap of poly webbing. It's used to make some fantastically wide-bandwidth single band dipoles, so I want to see if I can make a fan dipole using the stuff. There may be too much coupling between the wires, but it's worth a try. It might just need a lot of trimming to overcome the coupling. If that's the case, I may be able to make a decent multi-band fan dipole that's simpler to erect. I'd model it, but frankly, I don't yet know how to use the modeling software. I've got several programs, but they're so much Greek to me! hi hi

73
Gwen, NG3P

On Mon, Mar 16, 2020 at 2:38 PM Tim N9PUZ <tim.n9puz@...> wrote:
I am a big fan of end fed antennas for portable use as well. Even when I
am in a wooded area I usually use my 31' or 28' Jackite pole as a
support. I attach the wire to the tip, extend the mast to its full
height, and then just let it lean into a tree.

Tim N9PUZ

On 3/16/2020 10:36 AM, Nick Kennedy wrote:
> Getting back to the original poster - I like the EFHW for field
> operations because it only needs one support. I'm a total klutz when
> it comes to getting lines through trees. I also like the Jackite pole
> (31') as a support.






--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net

Tim N9PUZ
 

I am a big fan of end fed antennas for portable use as well. Even when I am in a wooded area I usually use my 31' or 28' Jackite pole as a support. I attach the wire to the tip, extend the mast to its full height, and then just let it lean into a tree.

Tim N9PUZ

On 3/16/2020 10:36 AM, Nick Kennedy wrote:
Getting back to the original poster - I like the EFHW for field operations because it only needs one support. I'm a total klutz when it comes to getting lines through trees. I also like the Jackite pole (31') as a support.

Jim Upson
 

Yes...I personally think it makes sense - as I stated 1000’s if hams use Type 43 for matching units....so I can’t believe it is a bad choice...just maybe not as optimal as it can be....

However.....as I want to reiterate....I am not technically skilled....but I believe KX0R is very technical (see his QRZ page)......so I wanted to share his thoughts in case others had not seen it...and to get your feedback....so THANK YOU for the response!

Once I build a Type 43 and a KX0R version I am hoping some power meter results and RBN spots will confirm the level of effectiveness differences....maybe it will be subtle....maybe significant....time will tell. :-)

Again....I am open to all solutions at this point....not sure what’s Josh is interested in trying...

THANK YOU for your comments....it does help me learn as I go...

73, Jim/ AC3B 


On Mon, Mar 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM John <ve3ips@...> wrote:
Jim

what shall we use if 43 is no good?   I learned a lot from your post and maybe i will just stick with a dipole to keep it ya'll ya'll simple simple

I also spent a lot of bench time working with type 43 and 61 transformers. Type 43 is so lossy that it’s hard to measure a resonant frequency in a tuned circuit. It’s really designed for broadband transmission line transformers and EMI suppression chokes. It’s not a good choice for conventional transformers. Many of the people posting here don’t seem to know what these terms mean. I would not use type 43 to feed the antenna in my SOTA systemThe reason some antennas use it is that its loss hides the mismatch errors in the system! It lowers SWR by adding loss  


John VE3IPS

Ham Radio is a lifestyle not a Hobby!
Take the radio outside and operate from the Field




On Mon, Mar 16, 2020 at 11:36 AM Nick Kennedy <kennnick@...> wrote:
Boy, a lot of good info in there Jim. Thanks for taking the time to put it all together.

One point I'll take a bit of an issue with is the suitability (or not) of ferrites such as type 43 for antenna matching transformers.

It's true that the Q can be as low as 1 at HF which can make one wonder how it can possibly be good for anything other than a choke at those frequencies. But it can. My explanation is that most of the losses are core losses caused by the flux in the core. But in a transformer with a high coupling coefficient, flux in the core is minimized and such losses are not excessive.

Your source suggested that with his allowance for transmission line transformers but I think it can be true for conventional transformers and autotransformers as well, although maybe not to the same extent.

Measurements should tell the tale. I did some with FT-114-43 transformers designed for EFHW matching a few years ago  and see losses on the order of 1 dB for 40 through 20. Not negligible but not prohibitive either.

The huge crowd of users of the currently popular homebrew version of the MyAntennas EFHW are using large diameter ferrite cores such as FT-240 to reduce losses as well as handle more power. They've also transitioned from type 43 to type 52 which does lower losses some more. 

Getting back to the original poster - I like the EFHW for field operations because it only needs one support. I'm a total klutz when it comes to getting lines through trees. I also like the Jackite pole (31') as a support.

73,

Nick, WA5BDU

John
 

Jim

what shall we use if 43 is no good?   I learned a lot from your post and maybe i will just stick with a dipole to keep it ya'll ya'll simple simple

I also spent a lot of bench time working with type 43 and 61 transformers. Type 43 is so lossy that it’s hard to measure a resonant frequency in a tuned circuit. It’s really designed for broadband transmission line transformers and EMI suppression chokes. It’s not a good choice for conventional transformers. Many of the people posting here don’t seem to know what these terms mean. I would not use type 43 to feed the antenna in my SOTA systemThe reason some antennas use it is that its loss hides the mismatch errors in the system! It lowers SWR by adding loss  


John VE3IPS

Ham Radio is a lifestyle not a Hobby!
Take the radio outside and operate from the Field




On Mon, Mar 16, 2020 at 11:36 AM Nick Kennedy <kennnick@...> wrote:
Boy, a lot of good info in there Jim. Thanks for taking the time to put it all together.

One point I'll take a bit of an issue with is the suitability (or not) of ferrites such as type 43 for antenna matching transformers.

It's true that the Q can be as low as 1 at HF which can make one wonder how it can possibly be good for anything other than a choke at those frequencies. But it can. My explanation is that most of the losses are core losses caused by the flux in the core. But in a transformer with a high coupling coefficient, flux in the core is minimized and such losses are not excessive.

Your source suggested that with his allowance for transmission line transformers but I think it can be true for conventional transformers and autotransformers as well, although maybe not to the same extent.

Measurements should tell the tale. I did some with FT-114-43 transformers designed for EFHW matching a few years ago  and see losses on the order of 1 dB for 40 through 20. Not negligible but not prohibitive either.

The huge crowd of users of the currently popular homebrew version of the MyAntennas EFHW are using large diameter ferrite cores such as FT-240 to reduce losses as well as handle more power. They've also transitioned from type 43 to type 52 which does lower losses some more. 

Getting back to the original poster - I like the EFHW for field operations because it only needs one support. I'm a total klutz when it comes to getting lines through trees. I also like the Jackite pole (31') as a support.

73,

Nick, WA5BDU

Nick WA5BDU
 

Boy, a lot of good info in there Jim. Thanks for taking the time to put it all together.

One point I'll take a bit of an issue with is the suitability (or not) of ferrites such as type 43 for antenna matching transformers.

It's true that the Q can be as low as 1 at HF which can make one wonder how it can possibly be good for anything other than a choke at those frequencies. But it can. My explanation is that most of the losses are core losses caused by the flux in the core. But in a transformer with a high coupling coefficient, flux in the core is minimized and such losses are not excessive.

Your source suggested that with his allowance for transmission line transformers but I think it can be true for conventional transformers and autotransformers as well, although maybe not to the same extent.

Measurements should tell the tale. I did some with FT-114-43 transformers designed for EFHW matching a few years ago  and see losses on the order of 1 dB for 40 through 20. Not negligible but not prohibitive either.

The huge crowd of users of the currently popular homebrew version of the MyAntennas EFHW are using large diameter ferrite cores such as FT-240 to reduce losses as well as handle more power. They've also transitioned from type 43 to type 52 which does lower losses some more. 

Getting back to the original poster - I like the EFHW for field operations because it only needs one support. I'm a total klutz when it comes to getting lines through trees. I also like the Jackite pole (31') as a support.

73,

Nick, WA5BDU

Jim Upson
 

Let me be clear.....I am NOT an expert.....and this LONG post may not be what anyone wants.....or may be 'old news' to everyone...or worse may not pass a 'test' by true technical experts....

With the caveats aside......My 3 part response to W0ODJ's question is:
>   Part 1...what I want to do in the <near> future
>   Part 2...what I am using today
>   Part 3...my conclusions....remember, I am not claiming to be an expert...please cut me some slack if I am off base....but also please let me know so I can learn from you and that I don't pollute with bad recommendations....

Part 1:  
I too am on a journey for an effective portable antenna solution....especially for operating portable on SOTA outings where time is in short supply (like when I do attempt to do multiple SOTA Summits in one day).  I have not proven any of these 3 solutions yet, but these are how I plan to focus my experimentation this spring/summer:

First..as backgrond in case you haven't seen this:   Sotabeams did a survey in 2014 and concluded this:   https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/blog/5-most-popular-hf-portable-antennas/  :

#1:  End Fed Half Way (18%)
#2:  Linked Dipole (16%)
#3:  Single Band Dipole (12%)
#4:  Random Length End Fed wire (12%)
#5:  Ground Plane (11%)

So......I've focused my attention towards the various End Fed solutions (Half-wave or Random)...The Half-Waves should be more 'efficient'....while the Random EF's offers greater band hopping versatility...

1)  64:1 solution with a Half Wave wire:  Answers to a very similar question that was posed on the SOTA Reflector:  https://reflector.sota.org.uk/t/kx2-3-w-tuner-owners-what-antenna-do-you-use/16758.   I thought the following from W2USA (at near the end of 67 responses posted) regarding a 64:1 solution was interesting.....see the link embedded in his response regarding N1KDO's 64:1 unun:

Sure, I have a buddy here locally (N1KDO) who has been using and liking this antenna setup with his KX3 for a while and has been encouraging me to give it a try. I finally built the unun pretty much exactly like he has on his website (link: https://www.n1kdo.com/baluns-ununs/index.html 69). It is the last thing on the page. I used a different case than he did, but it is pretty much the same otherwise. I made some small holes in the back of the case and looped a cable tie through it. Then I can velcro the cable tie to the pole, so it is not just hanging there. I dont have any pics of mine, but I will try to snap some next time I have it out.

The radiators are 0.5 wavelength and the counterpoise is 0.25 wavelength. The beauty of that is if you want to use the truly resonant wire for each band (and not have the tuner make up the difference) you can use/resuse wires as radiators and counterpoises. For example, the counterpoise for the 80m wire is the 40m radiator, the counterpoise for the 40m radiator can be used as the 20m radiator, and the 20m counterpoise can be the 10 radiator and so on. Same with 60/30/15. 17m and 12m are the only odd ducks that probably do best with their own set of wires. (I purposefully left out 6m since the KX2 doesnt have 6m :(. haha) So you can bring a whole “set” of wires out there and you will definitely have less than (# of bands)X2 sets of wires. Plus like I was saying before, the tuner can make up the difference as well. I did an activation a couple weeks ago, put the 40m set up, and did really well on both 40 and 20.

Hope that helps some.

-Steve / W2SWA

2)  49:1 solution with a Half-Wave wire:  Peanut Power QRP Multiband EFHW from G0POT... http://peanutpower.co.uk/efhw.    He briefly talks about in this youtube...starting at "1-min: 25-second" mark:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4nuZq2pcUA

3)  KX0R ...... I consider this guy an true technical expert.....I plan to try to make his solution after the above 2 solutions are first tried as I want to first "build up" my "builder skills".  The following LINK is to a very long article (read that as "with a lot of good details")...and if you subscribe to QRP Quarterly he also recently published it there too....And, If you look over his QRZ page...I think you will the same feeling I get....that he "knows his electrons" very well from both a theoretical and, more importantly, a practical point of view:  Here is KX0R's solution:    https://reflector.sota.org.uk/t/a-versatile-tuner-for-sota-activations-by-kx0r/19748  .  His SOTA scores are impressive....hence his solution is both theoretically and practically proven (at least in my eyes)

4)  I will also try a vertical...these are the one's I am focused on....
     
>   Buddistick:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVUrx8xL6EA   But if you go with 2 or more counterpoises...and you change bands....then they need to shortened/lengthened and that does not appeal to me on the surface....be sure to read the Buddipole in the Field, by B. Scott Andersen (NE1RD)...starting on page 106.

>  Another sort-of vertical solution is the "Mini Black Widow from WA3WSJ":    https://wa3wsj.homestead.com/UP-Outter_BW_Mini.html  this, I believe will not require re-turning the counterpoises or vertical length to change bands....

>  Finally another version is from QRP-GUYs.... https://qrpguys.com/qrpguys-tri-band-portable-vertical-antenna/nggallery/thumbnails   and following this advice regarding the counterpoise wires found within this SotaReflector posting:   https://reflector.sota.org.uk/t/interesting-new-sota-vertical-antenna/16885  (it's been awhile since I read all of it...but in general I recall 1 or 2 ELEVATED radials will improve its performance compared to the QRPGUY's solution of laying their 4 radials on the ground.

Part-2
For my current portable antenna....I have had what I think is very good success with a 20/40 EFHW (2-bands).....which I bought (not made) from LNR...but now you can buy them from Virbroplex.  This version was developed by Dale Parfitt/W4OP many years ago...and are still quite relevant and popular today...and were originally sold as Par-End-Feds., then LNR sold them, and now Virbroplex has taken over the commerical rights ( http://www.vibroplex.com/contents/en-us/p3413.html )...

I typically hang my 20/40 EFHW on a SOTABEAMS 23' mast (Tactical 7000hds) and just lean it against trees...with the wire oriented as an inverted-v and the ends 3+ feet above ground.  Goes up 'quick' and comes down 'quicker'   :-)     I can also make it a self-standing telescoping pole using this solution:   http://www.qsl.net/wb3gck/guyring.html This works amazingly well....even in some moderately windy conditions.....but I seldom need it unless out in an open field.

Just yesterday (Mar 14) I did a one-day '4-summit blitz' in the SOTA-Pittsburgh PA region (W3/PT)....and with my KX3 (with built-in tuner), 14-watts, and only using SSB....I worked England, Sweden, Germany, Spain, Canada (granted, my signal reports were typically 33 to 44 with some 55+ now and then...but then propagation isn't great either these days)...as well as all across the US (California, Texas, Wisconsin, Tennessee, Florida, NC, NY...etc.)  Here is just one of the 4 summit's log I did yesterday (if you have registered on SOTA, you can see all my contacts from yesterday....

image.png

I also have used in the past (2017 timeframe) a 17-meter Par-EFHW....and got great results across the Arizona, Colorado and west-coast.  Par EFHWs  'just plain work'....

So...1 or 2-bands EFHW works great for me...but of course it is very limiting....and I especially want to also have 60- and 80-meter bands for more close-in contacts...as you can see in my log from yesterday's SOTA outing above...I use the 20/40 on 80-meters with some success...the internal KX3 tuner tunes it to 1:1 or even 1:0.......albeit the signal reports are typically 22-44-ish due to it's shorten length I suppose....hence, I am on a quest for a more versatile solution but one that will minimize the compromises (efficiency losses) given my KX3's max low-power of 15-watts.  See Part-1 above for my "plans".

A friend, Jill N3ICE, was also out doing other summits (W3/SV area) yesterday and her solution is the Packtenna commercial 9:1 version.  With her RANDOM End-Fed APPROXIMATELY 59', and a shorter counterpoise...(I get the actual lengths later if you want them) she was able to work DX (Spain, Germany, Czech Republic, and all across the USA...with KX2 and 10-watts and all SSB......including one Summit-2-Summit with me at 15:07 UTC (signal reports 33 both ways).  

image.png

Part 3
So...what's the bottomline....at least from my neophyte perspective....

>  The 'best' (efficient) antenna is, as we all know, a resonant one...and the general wisdom I've collected on SOTA Reflector or other internet sources says a Linked-Dipole is one of the favorite SOTA antenna solutions..... similar to these commercial offerings from Sotabeams:   https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/four-band-portable-dipole-antenna-system-band-hopper-iv/ .  BUT BUT BUT.......you must get up and off your BUTT to change the links..which probably requires you to lower the telescoping pole...change the link....and re-raise the pole to change bands.....something that is less than exciting (pain in the BUTT) especially when you are in a wooded area and the wires are carefully placed among the tree branches....it's hard enough to be able to get all that wire up to begin with....let along be able to change the links from time to time....Hence, a compromise solution is a preferred approach to the otherwise resonant dipole version.  This is not for me....

> Next 'best' efficiency-based-solution seems to be EFHW's that 'perform' similar to a resonant dipole...because in reality they are (a resonant dipole....Half-Wave length......just fed at one end).  The challenge is to make them multibanded.....and this challenge has 2 options:  one can add links (BUT BUT BUT....), or add traps.  Adding traps are often thought of a 'big compromise'....but Tom W8JI has debunked that issue as not relevant (http://www.w8ji.com/traps.htm ).  Commercial versions of traps are available from Sotabeams...(10, 20 or 100-watt versions).  The limiting factor is that most people recommend to keep the number of traps in a wire to 2 traps (although I forget where I heard this...so I am not sure this is gospel)...giving you 3 bands.  For me, the first trapped EFHW I will make is for an 20, 40, 60 ......with a 49:1 or 64:1 unun near the radio end......I may later try a trap version giving me 4 bands (for 20, 30, 40, 60) when I know Morse Code.....or simply add a link at the end of 40m wire for the  4th band on a 2-trapped EFHW wire.

>>>> Quick note...this is probably not necessary...but....I refer a lot to Sotabeams....I have ZERO interest or stake of any kind with that company...I am just a very satisfied customer over the years...as I am with the 4States offerings...

>  I am surprised your 49:1 isn't working well for you....seems to me that it should be a near ideal solution (effective, fairly efficient and certainly "operator friendly") assuming your antenna is a Half-Wave long.  I'd suggest you maybe should have someone take a look at it with you to see if there is a good reason for it not working well for you.  I personally have very high-hopes for it....or it's cousin the 64:1 version....See "Peanut Power" in Part 1 above.

>  My 'ultimate' plan is the KX0R tuner solution....no traps, no links, one EF Random wire....if building one from scratch seems out of your skill...you might want to consider this excellent 4States QRP Club offering:   http://www.4sqrp.com/4stuner.php  which I THINK mimics closely to the KX0R solution (maybe others can confirm....but that is how I see it).  Here is a Youtube that shows the 4SQRP tuner........ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTHqz4XrVnM

>  Among the EF solutions, for me the last likely solution is a 9:1 solution.....it has the widest range of versatility.....but seems to generate both glowing as well as many rather un-favorable reviews.....but Jill, N3ICE certainly has done very well with her version....Balun Designs has a good reference for lengths to use:   https://www.balundesigns.com/content/Wire%20Lengths%20for%204%20and%209-1%20ununs.pdf   or here:   http://www.hamuniverse.com/randomwireantennalengths.html

I'll throw one last link I've found beneficial me to...I had asked a question on the SOTA reflector regarding when to use Ferrite vs Type 2 or Type 6 Powdered Iron toroids....  https://reflector.sota.org.uk/t/efhw-transformer-toroid-t-6-yellow-or-t-2-red-or-ft-43/18802   skip down to response #35 from KX0R.....and later in response #39.    I found his comment on type 43 toroids particularly interesting in that, at least from a theoretical point of view, and as such, the 49:1 or 64:1 solutions SHOULD NOT be as efficient as his solution discussed above in Part-1 (3rd solution from KX0R)....YET....to me.....there are literally 1000's of hams who give high praises for the 49:1 / 64:1 type of solution typically using a Type-43 toroid....

I also spent a lot of bench time working with type 43 and 61 transformers. Type 43 is so lossy that it’s hard to measure a resonant frequency in a tuned circuit. It’s really designed for broadband transmission line transformers and EMI suppression chokes. It’s not a good choice for conventional transformers. Many of the people posting here don’t seem to know what these terms mean. I would not use type 43 to feed the antenna in my SOTA system. The reason some antennas use it is that its loss hides the mismatch errors in the system! It lowers SWR by adding loss.

I personally do NOT think KX0R is more of a theoretician than a practician...actually I think he is basically both practical (end results oriented) grounded in the theoretical....thus I've chosen to think it's valid (but with my caveats, I have no skills to prove or refute his finding)...

OK...that's given you WAY much reading.....I hope that maybe some of it is useful or possibly new news to you.....but if this is all old news...then all I can say is that I am sorry for taking up so much digital ink....like I said in the beginning...."I too am on a journey...."

I would really like to know where you end up....sharing ideas makes this hobby the best in the world (for me anyway)....

To those with strong technical skills....I would HIGHLY value your response if what I am saying is wrong technically...other otherwise bad advice....I want to be correct....yet I know my serious limitations regarding technical topics....

Humbly,
 72/73, Jim AC3B




Austin Seraphin
 

I have an AXE1 and a Buddistick, but got them as we entered the cooler part of the year, so haven't had much time to test them. The Buddistick can take a little work to tune, but once you set it up it will send out a reliable signal. Just remember to straighten out the coax. The AXE1 works well for quick operation, but I find it didn't tune quite as reliably. If you give the auto tune button on the KX3 a second tap it might do a better job. I'll test more as it gets nicer. I also think I will refit an Alpha Loop with a knob so I can tune it without power. A magnetic loop on the roof deck sounds fun.


On 3/14/20 6:43 PM, Gwen Patton wrote:
It's interesting that you mention W3EDP antennas, Joshua. I have one as my main wire on my home station right now. I love the design, and it seems to work really well for me. I haven't used one portable, though. Should work about the same, I would think. I ran a half-sized one a couple of years ago, as an expedient over the winter when my OCFD came down in a storm, and it worked, just not nearly as well as I'd like. I also have a quarter-size one I used indoors as a test antenna on my bench. Again, it worked, but not super well because of the size and location.

I have the Elecraft AX/AXE portable antenna, but I haven't really had a chance to test it out yet. Maybe this week, if the weather is nice, I'll take it out in the backyard and give it a try. I also have a nifty antenna I bought from a guy on Etsy. He calls it a "SlinkTenna". It's the old standard Slinky antenna, except he uses the junior sized Slinkies, and builds the whole thing in a very well thought out PVC enclosure. It's at https://www.etsy.com/listing/671341314/slinktenna-80m-6m-helical-dipole-hf-ham -- I recommend the optional support kit.

Ok, I'll be quiet now. ;)

73,
Gwen, NG3P

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 3:32 PM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Spring is right around the corner, so i'm looking at my current portable antenna options.  Does anyone have any advice on easily deployable portable antennas?  I've had minimal luck with my homebrew EFHWs using a 49:1, and my 9:1 not-so-random wires usually seem deaf.  The NorCal Doublet I made works okay, but is finicky to deploy, and fragile (ribbon cable isn't meant for 40ft runs, apparently).  I made two KE4PT End-Fed OCFD, and loved their form factor - but not their results.  My PAC-12 has had some decent results, but is finicky to tune.  My homemade Mag Loop (using the chameleon kit) has nice sharp tuning and good receive, but i've struggled making contacts with it.  I've had mixed results with a number of QRPGuys kits, as well.

I know it seems like a silly question, but- does anyone have any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)?  A club member has loaned me one of their W3EDP, but weather and family obligations haven't been conducive to testing it yet.  I figured now is the time to build new antennas to test this spring / summer!

~Josh
W0ODJ


--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net
-- 
73, Austin, KA3TTT
https://ka3ttt.net

Dr. Skip Amis
 

I found this and it sure makes sense to me - hope it is of help to you


NorCal Doublet Antenna By Doug Hendricks, KI6DS The NorCal Doublet Antenna came about due to my desire for a simple antenna that could be erected very fast, only needed one center support, and did not take up much
www.norcalqrp.org
blessings to all - Skip

"If you are able to read this, thank a teacher;
  while it is still in English, thank a veteran!"
  May God bless -
  Dr. Skip Amis, N5CFM, NV5V; PhD, DMin, DDiv, MDiv.
         < ' )))>< Proudly serving those who serve since 1973.
 U.S. Navy,1965-'66; U.S. Merchant Marines,1973-'79.  


From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> on behalf of Jim Long <jphiliplong@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 7:57 AM
To: main@4sqrp.groups.io <main@4sqrp.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] Fire In The Wire
 
I am intrigued by the Norcal doublet.    Upon some cursory looking, I do not see 50 foot lengths of ribbon cable.  How about Ethernet cable?  Would it be strong enough to be suspended?  Are the individual wires insulated or bare?

Jim WW9H

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 7:02 AM John <ve3ips@...> wrote:
Josh

You can build out a kit of antennas using common connectors and interchangable components like Lego

Dipole
Vertical
End Fed
Short antennas

These antennas can be rapidly deployed for field use based on terrain

You can use  a Buddipole as a dipole with wires by using the center insulator only

You can use a Packtennas different ways

Even Chameleon can be your friend (check out their user guides)

The fastest antenna to deploy is the SuperAntenna

So many antennas so little time. Or just throw up a random wire and use a tuner

Or spend $2 and make a NorCal Doublet
John VE3IPS

On Sat., Mar. 14, 2020, 18:44 Gwen Patton, <ardrhi@...> wrote:
It's interesting that you mention W3EDP antennas, Joshua. I have one as my main wire on my home station right now. I love the design, and it seems to work really well for me. I haven't used one portable, though. Should work about the same, I would think. I ran a half-sized one a couple of years ago, as an expedient over the winter when my OCFD came down in a storm, and it worked, just not nearly as well as I'd like. I also have a quarter-size one I used indoors as a test antenna on my bench. Again, it worked, but not super well because of the size and location.

I have the Elecraft AX/AXE portable antenna, but I haven't really had a chance to test it out yet. Maybe this week, if the weather is nice, I'll take it out in the backyard and give it a try. I also have a nifty antenna I bought from a guy on Etsy. He calls it a "SlinkTenna". It's the old standard Slinky antenna, except he uses the junior sized Slinkies, and builds the whole thing in a very well thought out PVC enclosure. It's at https://www.etsy.com/listing/671341314/slinktenna-80m-6m-helical-dipole-hf-ham -- I recommend the optional support kit.

Ok, I'll be quiet now. ;)

73,
Gwen, NG3P

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 3:32 PM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Spring is right around the corner, so i'm looking at my current portable antenna options.  Does anyone have any advice on easily deployable portable antennas?  I've had minimal luck with my homebrew EFHWs using a 49:1, and my 9:1 not-so-random wires usually seem deaf.  The NorCal Doublet I made works okay, but is finicky to deploy, and fragile (ribbon cable isn't meant for 40ft runs, apparently).  I made two KE4PT End-Fed OCFD, and loved their form factor - but not their results.  My PAC-12 has had some decent results, but is finicky to tune.  My homemade Mag Loop (using the chameleon kit) has nice sharp tuning and good receive, but i've struggled making contacts with it.  I've had mixed results with a number of QRPGuys kits, as well.

I know it seems like a silly question, but- does anyone have any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)?  A club member has loaned me one of their W3EDP, but weather and family obligations haven't been conducive to testing it yet.  I figured now is the time to build new antennas to test this spring / summer!

~Josh
W0ODJ



--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net

Jim Long
 

I am intrigued by the Norcal doublet.    Upon some cursory looking, I do not see 50 foot lengths of ribbon cable.  How about Ethernet cable?  Would it be strong enough to be suspended?  Are the individual wires insulated or bare?

Jim WW9H

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 7:02 AM John <ve3ips@...> wrote:
Josh

You can build out a kit of antennas using common connectors and interchangable components like Lego

Dipole
Vertical
End Fed
Short antennas

These antennas can be rapidly deployed for field use based on terrain

You can use  a Buddipole as a dipole with wires by using the center insulator only

You can use a Packtennas different ways

Even Chameleon can be your friend (check out their user guides)

The fastest antenna to deploy is the SuperAntenna

So many antennas so little time. Or just throw up a random wire and use a tuner

Or spend $2 and make a NorCal Doublet
John VE3IPS

On Sat., Mar. 14, 2020, 18:44 Gwen Patton, <ardrhi@...> wrote:
It's interesting that you mention W3EDP antennas, Joshua. I have one as my main wire on my home station right now. I love the design, and it seems to work really well for me. I haven't used one portable, though. Should work about the same, I would think. I ran a half-sized one a couple of years ago, as an expedient over the winter when my OCFD came down in a storm, and it worked, just not nearly as well as I'd like. I also have a quarter-size one I used indoors as a test antenna on my bench. Again, it worked, but not super well because of the size and location.

I have the Elecraft AX/AXE portable antenna, but I haven't really had a chance to test it out yet. Maybe this week, if the weather is nice, I'll take it out in the backyard and give it a try. I also have a nifty antenna I bought from a guy on Etsy. He calls it a "SlinkTenna". It's the old standard Slinky antenna, except he uses the junior sized Slinkies, and builds the whole thing in a very well thought out PVC enclosure. It's at https://www.etsy.com/listing/671341314/slinktenna-80m-6m-helical-dipole-hf-ham -- I recommend the optional support kit.

Ok, I'll be quiet now. ;)

73,
Gwen, NG3P

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 3:32 PM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Spring is right around the corner, so i'm looking at my current portable antenna options.  Does anyone have any advice on easily deployable portable antennas?  I've had minimal luck with my homebrew EFHWs using a 49:1, and my 9:1 not-so-random wires usually seem deaf.  The NorCal Doublet I made works okay, but is finicky to deploy, and fragile (ribbon cable isn't meant for 40ft runs, apparently).  I made two KE4PT End-Fed OCFD, and loved their form factor - but not their results.  My PAC-12 has had some decent results, but is finicky to tune.  My homemade Mag Loop (using the chameleon kit) has nice sharp tuning and good receive, but i've struggled making contacts with it.  I've had mixed results with a number of QRPGuys kits, as well.

I know it seems like a silly question, but- does anyone have any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)?  A club member has loaned me one of their W3EDP, but weather and family obligations haven't been conducive to testing it yet.  I figured now is the time to build new antennas to test this spring / summer!

~Josh
W0ODJ



--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net

John
 

Josh

You can build out a kit of antennas using common connectors and interchangable components like Lego

Dipole
Vertical
End Fed
Short antennas

These antennas can be rapidly deployed for field use based on terrain

You can use  a Buddipole as a dipole with wires by using the center insulator only

You can use a Packtennas different ways

Even Chameleon can be your friend (check out their user guides)

The fastest antenna to deploy is the SuperAntenna

So many antennas so little time. Or just throw up a random wire and use a tuner

Or spend $2 and make a NorCal Doublet
John VE3IPS

On Sat., Mar. 14, 2020, 18:44 Gwen Patton, <ardrhi@...> wrote:
It's interesting that you mention W3EDP antennas, Joshua. I have one as my main wire on my home station right now. I love the design, and it seems to work really well for me. I haven't used one portable, though. Should work about the same, I would think. I ran a half-sized one a couple of years ago, as an expedient over the winter when my OCFD came down in a storm, and it worked, just not nearly as well as I'd like. I also have a quarter-size one I used indoors as a test antenna on my bench. Again, it worked, but not super well because of the size and location.

I have the Elecraft AX/AXE portable antenna, but I haven't really had a chance to test it out yet. Maybe this week, if the weather is nice, I'll take it out in the backyard and give it a try. I also have a nifty antenna I bought from a guy on Etsy. He calls it a "SlinkTenna". It's the old standard Slinky antenna, except he uses the junior sized Slinkies, and builds the whole thing in a very well thought out PVC enclosure. It's at https://www.etsy.com/listing/671341314/slinktenna-80m-6m-helical-dipole-hf-ham -- I recommend the optional support kit.

Ok, I'll be quiet now. ;)

73,
Gwen, NG3P

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 3:32 PM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Spring is right around the corner, so i'm looking at my current portable antenna options.  Does anyone have any advice on easily deployable portable antennas?  I've had minimal luck with my homebrew EFHWs using a 49:1, and my 9:1 not-so-random wires usually seem deaf.  The NorCal Doublet I made works okay, but is finicky to deploy, and fragile (ribbon cable isn't meant for 40ft runs, apparently).  I made two KE4PT End-Fed OCFD, and loved their form factor - but not their results.  My PAC-12 has had some decent results, but is finicky to tune.  My homemade Mag Loop (using the chameleon kit) has nice sharp tuning and good receive, but i've struggled making contacts with it.  I've had mixed results with a number of QRPGuys kits, as well.

I know it seems like a silly question, but- does anyone have any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)?  A club member has loaned me one of their W3EDP, but weather and family obligations haven't been conducive to testing it yet.  I figured now is the time to build new antennas to test this spring / summer!

~Josh
W0ODJ



--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net

Gwen Patton
 

It's interesting that you mention W3EDP antennas, Joshua. I have one as my main wire on my home station right now. I love the design, and it seems to work really well for me. I haven't used one portable, though. Should work about the same, I would think. I ran a half-sized one a couple of years ago, as an expedient over the winter when my OCFD came down in a storm, and it worked, just not nearly as well as I'd like. I also have a quarter-size one I used indoors as a test antenna on my bench. Again, it worked, but not super well because of the size and location.

I have the Elecraft AX/AXE portable antenna, but I haven't really had a chance to test it out yet. Maybe this week, if the weather is nice, I'll take it out in the backyard and give it a try. I also have a nifty antenna I bought from a guy on Etsy. He calls it a "SlinkTenna". It's the old standard Slinky antenna, except he uses the junior sized Slinkies, and builds the whole thing in a very well thought out PVC enclosure. It's at https://www.etsy.com/listing/671341314/slinktenna-80m-6m-helical-dipole-hf-ham -- I recommend the optional support kit.

Ok, I'll be quiet now. ;)

73,
Gwen, NG3P

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 3:32 PM Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:
Spring is right around the corner, so i'm looking at my current portable antenna options.  Does anyone have any advice on easily deployable portable antennas?  I've had minimal luck with my homebrew EFHWs using a 49:1, and my 9:1 not-so-random wires usually seem deaf.  The NorCal Doublet I made works okay, but is finicky to deploy, and fragile (ribbon cable isn't meant for 40ft runs, apparently).  I made two KE4PT End-Fed OCFD, and loved their form factor - but not their results.  My PAC-12 has had some decent results, but is finicky to tune.  My homemade Mag Loop (using the chameleon kit) has nice sharp tuning and good receive, but i've struggled making contacts with it.  I've had mixed results with a number of QRPGuys kits, as well.

I know it seems like a silly question, but- does anyone have any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)?  A club member has loaned me one of their W3EDP, but weather and family obligations haven't been conducive to testing it yet.  I figured now is the time to build new antennas to test this spring / summer!

~Josh
W0ODJ



--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net

David Wilcox
 

Josh,

While not an expert in my 60 years of ham radio I find that 5 watts even with a good antenna is iffy depending on the bands, the gray line, etc.  I am down in Florida in a 3rd floor condo with a large balcony and even FT8 is iffy at times compared with my G5RV at home.   My plan for next year is to run at least 25 watts and use my Buddipole and/Buddistick along with my mag loop.  I left it home this year depending on a QRPGuys 3 band vertical hanging down from our balcony but too much metal in the concrete and stucco siding and a mag loop.  I really need to get my equipment down on the beach as antennas need to be discreet in our rented condo.

Make sure to have some form of an antenna analyzer when you set up any of your antennas.  Every little bit of power out is helpful.  I prefer a YouKits analyzer as it works and is easy to use.  Nothing fancy but it tells me SWR and impedance. Works well tuning the Buddistick and pole, and mag loop.

The Super Antenna MP1 is also a good portable antenna but your PAC 12 is good also.  I have used both.

So 25 watts at least, best antenna you can put up, and an analyzer for tuning.  Have fun.

Dave K8WPE



David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad

On Mar 14, 2020, at 3:32 PM, Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:


Spring is right around the corner, so i'm looking at my current portable antenna options.  Does anyone have any advice on easily deployable portable antennas?  I've had minimal luck with my homebrew EFHWs using a 49:1, and my 9:1 not-so-random wires usually seem deaf.  The NorCal Doublet I made works okay, but is finicky to deploy, and fragile (ribbon cable isn't meant for 40ft runs, apparently).  I made two KE4PT End-Fed OCFD, and loved their form factor - but not their results.  My PAC-12 has had some decent results, but is finicky to tune.  My homemade Mag Loop (using the chameleon kit) has nice sharp tuning and good receive, but i've struggled making contacts with it.  I've had mixed results with a number of QRPGuys kits, as well.

I know it seems like a silly question, but- does anyone have any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)?  A club member has loaned me one of their W3EDP, but weather and family obligations haven't been conducive to testing it yet.  I figured now is the time to build new antennas to test this spring / summer!

~Josh
W0ODJ

W0EAX
 

Josh
Have you checked out the Buddistick or Buddipole ? The Buddipole works very well

Ron   W0EAX


On Mar 14, 2020, at 12:32 PM, Joshua Wood <WoodJRx@...> wrote:


Spring is right around the corner, so i'm looking at my current portable antenna options.  Does anyone have any advice on easily deployable portable antennas?  I've had minimal luck with my homebrew EFHWs using a 49:1, and my 9:1 not-so-random wires usually seem deaf.  The NorCal Doublet I made works okay, but is finicky to deploy, and fragile (ribbon cable isn't meant for 40ft runs, apparently).  I made two KE4PT End-Fed OCFD, and loved their form factor - but not their results.  My PAC-12 has had some decent results, but is finicky to tune.  My homemade Mag Loop (using the chameleon kit) has nice sharp tuning and good receive, but i've struggled making contacts with it.  I've had mixed results with a number of QRPGuys kits, as well.

I know it seems like a silly question, but- does anyone have any advice for a portable (i.e. small packed size) multi-band HF antenna (40-30-20-15)?  A club member has loaned me one of their W3EDP, but weather and family obligations haven't been conducive to testing it yet.  I figured now is the time to build new antennas to test this spring / summer!

~Josh
W0ODJ