Topics

Raspberry Pi


Jim Sheldon
 

Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards.  I've wanted a good reason to learn Linux but I didn't want to set up a dual boot partition on my main Windows computer or the laptop so this little board will fill the bill nicely.  It even has HDMI video out and I ordered an HDMI to VGA adapter so I can hook it to a decent extra flat screen monitor I happen to have laying around here.  I've heard that quite a few of the ham radio apps that have been compiled for Linux will run on it, and FLDIGI for certain, so it looks to become a really nice field companion for my Elecraft KX3.  
 
If anyone on here has one of these, I'd appreciate any help available to get started with it.  I should receive it probably early next week.  These things are so popular that most places can't seem to be able to keep 'em in stock but I lucked out and found that MCM Electronics had some left.  I've dealt with them before and always had good luck with their customer service so I ordered the board from them.  The rest of the stuff I'm getting from www.adafruit.com who was out of the computers but had the accessories I wanted in stock.  I'll probably order one of the add on "real world" controller/breadboard cards to enable all sorts of neat external device control possibilities.
 
Jim - W0EB
 


Gary <countyhunterw4gns@...>
 

  Have fun with it Jim ! I have wanted one really bad, but I bought a Beaglebone, so I can’t really justify a Raspberry Pi.
 
73 Gary W4GNS
 

Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards. 
Jim - W0EB
 


Johnny AC0BQ
 

Ge Jim

Sounds like fun!
Where did you get the main Board?
Is like one of the miniature Scopes some of the guys were playing with a while back?
Tnx
72
Johnny
AC0BQ



On Tuesday, April 16, 2013, Jim Sheldon wrote:
 

Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards.  I've wanted a good reason to learn Linux but I didn't want to set up a dual boot partition on my main Windows computer or the laptop so this little board will fill the bill nicely.  It even has HDMI video out and I ordered an HDMI to VGA adapter so I can hook it to a decent extra flat screen monitor I happen to have laying around here.  I've heard that quite a few of the ham radio apps that have been compiled for Linux will run on it, and FLDIGI for certain, so it looks to become a really nice field companion for my Elecraft KX3.  
 
If anyone on here has one of these, I'd appreciate any help available to get started with it.  I should receive it probably early next week.  These things are so popular that most places can't seem to be able to keep 'em in stock but I lucked out and found that MCM Electronics had some left.  I've dealt with them before and always had good luck with their customer service so I ordered the board from them.  The rest of the stuff I'm getting from www.adafruit.com who was out of the computers but had the accessories I wanted in stock.  I'll probably order one of the add on "real world" controller/breadboard cards to enable all sorts of neat external device control possibilities.
 
Jim - W0EB
 


Walter - K5EST
 

RP's are awesome. There is a great bunch if us on Twitter!

My Pi is not hooked up yet to any rigs. The HDMI output will look great on a big screen TV:-)

73....Walter . K5EST

On Apr 16, 2013 6:35 PM, "Jim Sheldon" <w0eb@...> wrote:
 

Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards.  I've wanted a good reason to learn Linux but I didn't want to set up a dual boot partition on my main Windows computer or the laptop so this little board will fill the bill nicely.  It even has HDMI video out and I ordered an HDMI to VGA adapter so I can hook it to a decent extra flat screen monitor I happen to have laying around here.  I've heard that quite a few of the ham radio apps that have been compiled for Linux will run on it, and FLDIGI for certain, so it looks to become a really nice field companion for my Elecraft KX3.  
 
If anyone on here has one of these, I'd appreciate any help available to get started with it.  I should receive it probably early next week.  These things are so popular that most places can't seem to be able to keep 'em in stock but I lucked out and found that MCM Electronics had some left.  I've dealt with them before and always had good luck with their customer service so I ordered the board from them.  The rest of the stuff I'm getting from www.adafruit.com who was out of the computers but had the accessories I wanted in stock.  I'll probably order one of the add on "real world" controller/breadboard cards to enable all sorts of neat external device control possibilities.
 
Jim - W0EB
 


davemrtn
 

Jim,
    I ordered and received mine before OzarkCon but haven't powered it up yet.

On 04/16/2013 06:35 PM, Jim Sheldon wrote:
 
Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards.  I've wanted a good reason to learn Linux but I didn't want to set up a dual boot partition on my main Windows computer or the laptop so this little board will fill the bill nicely.  It even has HDMI video out and I ordered an HDMI to VGA adapter so I can hook it to a decent extra flat screen monitor I happen to have laying around here.  I've heard that quite a few of the ham radio apps that have been compiled for Linux will run on it, and FLDIGI for certain, so it looks to become a really nice field companion for my Elecraft KX3.  
 
If anyone on here has one of these, I'd appreciate any help available to get started with it.  I should receive it probably early next week.  These things are so popular that most places can't seem to be able to keep 'em in stock but I lucked out and found that MCM Electronics had some left.  I've dealt with them before and always had good luck with their customer service so I ordered the board from them.  The rest of the stuff I'm getting from www.adafruit.com who was out of the computers but had the accessories I wanted in stock.  I'll probably order one of the add on "real world" controller/breadboard cards to enable all sorts of neat external device control possibilities.
 
Jim - W0EB
 


--
David Martin - K5DCM ---o0o---
Mountain Home, Arkansas

Guns don't kill people, any more than spoons & forks cause obesity.
Automobile efficiency is measured in MPG, NOT Gallons per Mile.
Amateur Radio efficiency, fun & skill is measured by Miles Per Watt, NOT Watts per Mile.

 


Charlie Vest
 

I am not up to speed on these Raspberry Pi's . I have seen them mentioned on other groups , plus an article on one hams web page that was using his as a transmitter . Same ham that wrote the QST January 2013 article about using the foreign TV USB Dongle , as an SDR and an up converter to also use it on MW , LF , in addition to its original VHF/UHF configuration I think .

So for a beginner , I am looking for help and guidance in what to order to get started . I want a good enough unit that I will be able to use as I advance . On the MCM web page I think I am looking for something from the "B" group , since the ones I assume that are being used are the ones with more memory and in my case , I also want one , from what I can tell , that already has Linux installed . Linux is also a pretty weak area of mine also .

So what do you all recommend ? I don't want to go all out right off of the bat , so I also want to be frugal "read cheap" at first :)  I have far more time than money :)

Charlie , W5COV

 

Jim,
    I ordered and received mine before OzarkCon but haven't powered it up yet.

On 04/16/2013 06:35 PM, Jim Sheldon wrote:
 
Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards.  I've wanted a good reason to learn Linux but I didn't want to set up a dual boot partition on my main Windows computer or the laptop so this little board will fill the bill nicely.  It even has HDMI video out and I ordered an HDMI to VGA adapter so I can hook it to a decent extra flat screen monitor I happen to have laying around here.  I've heard that quite a few of the ham radio apps that have been compiled for Linux will run on it, and FLDIGI for certain, so it looks to become a really nice field companion for my Elecraft KX3.  
 
If anyone on here has one of these, I'd appreciate any help available to get started with it.  I should receive it probably early next week.  These things are so popular that most places can't seem to be able to keep 'em in stock but I lucked out and found that MCM Electronics had some left.  I've dealt with them before and always had good luck with their customer service so I ordered the board from them.  The rest of the stuff I'm getting from www.adafruit.com who was out of the computers but had the accessories I wanted in stock.  I'll probably order one of the add on "real world" controller/breadboard cards to enable all sorts of neat external device control possibilities.
 
Jim - W0EB
 


--
David Martin - K5DCM ---o0o---
Mountain Home, Arkansas

Guns don't kill people, any more than spoons & forks cause obesity.
Automobile efficiency is measured in MPG, NOT Gallons per Mile.
Amateur Radio efficiency, fun & skill is measured by Miles Per Watt, NOT Watts per Mile.

 



Bill Cromwell
 

On Tue, 2013-04-16 at 20:51 -0500, Charlie , W5COV wrote:

I am not up to speed on these Raspberry Pi's . I have seen them
mentioned on other groups , plus an article on one hams web page that
was using his as a transmitter . Same ham that wrote the QST January
2013 article about using the foreign TV USB Dongle , as an SDR and an
up converter to also use it on MW , LF , in addition to its original
VHF/UHF configuration I think .

So for a beginner , I am looking for help and guidance in what to
order to get started . I want a good enough unit that I will be able
to use as I advance . On the MCM web page I think I am looking for
something from the "B" group , since the ones I assume that are being
used are the ones with more memory and in my case , I also want one ,
from what I can tell , that already has Linux installed . Linux is
also a pretty weak area of mine also .

So what do you all recommend ? I don't want to go all out right off of
the bat , so I also want to be frugal "read cheap" at first :) I have
far more time than money :)

Charlie , W5COV

Hi Charlie,

I am not up to speed on those PIs either so I went and looked at their
web site. I think you are right about the B model being the one to get.
The prices I saw were $35 for that compared to $25 for the lesser A
model. I think the A would work but $10 for for the better one is a
no-brainer. That $10 difference would be big deal for somebody who needs
a boxcar full of them for a school. Not for us. I plan to play with one.
I have several things in mind to try with it but like you, I don't want
to go whole hog right up front. I'll run mine with a television for a
display. I have been using Linux for decades now so that part is
something I won't have to deal with. I am still using a television as
the display for my Apple II (grin). I intend to use a USB "thumb"
drive..they're cheap AND I already have two or three laying around here
that I use for "sneakernet". Small keyboards and mice/trackballs are
also inexpensive and can use the USB ports.

Finally...something new that's digital AND that I can get excited about!
If my experiments work out I may need several!

73,

Bill KU8H


 

I received mine about three weeks ago from MCM. I went the cheap route
and opted to write the OS to the SD card myself. It took a couple of
tries as I had to read the instructions *carefully* after the first
couple of failed writes (I was writing to the wrong device (partition)).

Regardless, it is running a custom version of Debian--Raspbian--so it is
quite familiar to me as that is the same distribution I use. I hope to
use mine for the brains of a satellite az-el controller with a custom
Hamlib backend. I'm too busy with other stuff right now to start on it,
perhaps next winter. I plan to have it drive the interface described in
December 1998 QST which used two U-100 rotors. I have a few of those
laying around.

With the Hamlib network rotor daemon running, it should be a simple
matter of having Gpredict aim the antennas. Yes, it's overkill for
LEO's, but sometimes reinventing the wheel with complexity is its own
sort of enjoyment. :-)

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


 

A word on the Pi's USB ports, they cannot source much power so it is
wise to connect the USB devices to it using a powered USB hub. A
keyboard and mouse is probably the limit that it can support without a
hub.

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


Ray Cadmus
 

The Pi is a neat little computer - unfortunately not enough zip to handle fldigi.  There is an alternative that works.  Check out the linpsk demo on AmateurLogic.tv episode 53.  George has tried fldigi and gave up.  linpsk seems to work OK.   An older episode of AmateurLogic.tv has George making a nice case for the Pi from a common electrical box.  Then a later episode still he builds a 12v to 5v regulator to power his from the shack power supply.

Do you get the idea that I like AmateurLogic?  Nice shows...

My Pi is loafing along doing lots of nothing right now.  Had it set up as a web server for a while but since I have another that isn't really needed.  I just do a remote login now and then and ask it how it's doing.  Still looking for the killer app to put on it.  Playing with call sign lookup,  Reverse Beacon reads,  logging and such.   Am finding my programming skills a bit rusty so am having to re-learn lots of stuff myself.

Don't be afraid to try it - lots of help available.  Good tutorials on AdaFruit,  RaspberryPiSpy and others.

should you be really desperate,  I'm here to answer whatever I can.

Enjoy,

ray    W0PFO

--

On 04/16/2013 06:35 PM, Jim Sheldon wrote:
 
Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards.  I've wanted a good reason to learn Linux but I didn't want to set up a dual boot partition on my main Windows computer or the laptop so this little board will fill the bill nicely.  It even has HDMI video out and I ordered an HDMI to VGA adapter so I can hook it to a decent extra flat screen monitor I happen to have laying around here.  I've heard that quite a few of the ham radio apps that have been compiled for Linux will run on it, and FLDIGI for certain, so it looks to become a really nice field companion for my Elecraft KX3.  
 
If anyone on here has one of these, I'd appreciate any help available to get started with it.  I should receive it probably early next week.  These things are so popular that most places can't seem to be able to keep 'em in stock but I lucked out and found that MCM Electronics had some left.  I've dealt with them before and always had good luck with their customer service so I ordered the board from them.  The rest of the stuff I'm getting from www.adafruit.com who was out of the computers but had the accessories I wanted in stock.  I'll probably order one of the add on "real world" controller/breadboard cards to enable all sorts of neat external device control possibilities.
 
Jim - W0EB
 


Jim Sheldon
 

Thanks Nate, I had already gathered that. I've got a nice powered USB 2.0 hub just waiting for the pi to get here. I'm sure I'll find lots of stuff that won't run on it, but for $35 it's worth a shot.

Jim

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 16, 2013, at 9:40 PM, Nate Bargmann <n0nb@n0nb.us> wrote:

A word on the Pi's USB ports, they cannot source much power so it is
wise to connect the USB devices to it using a powered USB hub. A
keyboard and mouse is probably the limit that it can support without a
hub.

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


------------------------------------

4SQRP Website: http://4sqrp.com
OzarkCon is coming April 5-6 in Branson, MO
View Details at http://www.ozarkcon.com/index.phpYahoo! Groups Links



Jim Sheldon
 

Having successfully put the Android OS on a Barnes and Noble Nook, I already had the resources on hand to load Raspbian on a 16 gig Micro SD card and have it ready for when the Rpi gets here. It passed the hash code check so I'm pretty sure it'll boot up. I've got a little 20 gig USB hard drive that might run via the powered hub as well - remains to be seen, but worth a try at any rate. Got big plans for it, now to see how much will work. I've got an adjustable 2 amp regulator board that I plan on setting up to power it off a 12 volt supply and/or an 8 amp hour battery pack.

Jim

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 16, 2013, at 9:33 PM, Nate Bargmann <n0nb@n0nb.us> wrote:

I received mine about three weeks ago from MCM. I went the cheap route
and opted to write the OS to the SD card myself. It took a couple of
tries as I had to read the instructions *carefully* after the first
couple of failed writes (I was writing to the wrong device (partition)).

Regardless, it is running a custom version of Debian--Raspbian--so it is
quite familiar to me as that is the same distribution I use. I hope to
use mine for the brains of a satellite az-el controller with a custom
Hamlib backend. I'm too busy with other stuff right now to start on it,
perhaps next winter. I plan to have it drive the interface described in
December 1998 QST which used two U-100 rotors. I have a few of those
laying around.

With the Hamlib network rotor daemon running, it should be a simple
matter of having Gpredict aim the antennas. Yes, it's overkill for
LEO's, but sometimes reinventing the wheel with complexity is its own
sort of enjoyment. :-)

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


------------------------------------

4SQRP Website: http://4sqrp.com
OzarkCon is coming April 5-6 in Branson, MO
View Details at http://www.ozarkcon.com/index.phpYahoo! Groups Links



Jeremy Utley
 

I have a R-Pi here at home, running an APRS Digi/I-Gate.  I'm a linux guy in the day job, so I'll be happy to help you out with any questions you might have.  Just drop me a line!

Jeremy, N9PH

On 4/16/2013 6:35 PM, Jim Sheldon wrote:
 
Well, I did it.  Took the plunge and ordered one of those little Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards.  I've wanted a good reason to learn Linux but I didn't want to set up a dual boot partition on my main Windows computer or the laptop so this little board will fill the bill nicely.  It even has HDMI video out and I ordered an HDMI to VGA adapter so I can hook it to a decent extra flat screen monitor I happen to have laying around here.  I've heard that quite a few of the ham radio apps that have been compiled for Linux will run on it, and FLDIGI for certain, so it looks to become a really nice field companion for my Elecraft KX3.  
 
If anyone on here has one of these, I'd appreciate any help available to get started with it.  I should receive it probably early next week.  These things are so popular that most places can't seem to be able to keep 'em in stock but I lucked out and found that MCM Electronics had some left.  I've dealt with them before and always had good luck with their customer service so I ordered the board from them.  The rest of the stuff I'm getting from www.adafruit.com who was out of the computers but had the accessories I wanted in stock.  I'll probably order one of the add on "real world" controller/breadboard cards to enable all sorts of neat external device control possibilities.
 
Jim - W0EB
 


Bill Cromwell
 

On Tue, 2013-04-16 at 21:40 -0500, Nate Bargmann wrote:

A word on the Pi's USB ports, they cannot source much power so it is
wise to connect the USB devices to it using a powered USB hub. A
keyboard and mouse is probably the limit that it can support without a
hub.

72, de Nate >>

Hi Nate,

Thanks for emphasizing that. I already noted the recommendation to use a
powered hub for that reason. The idea is set more firmly in my haid now.

73,

Bill KU8H


 

You're welcome, Bill, Jim, et. al.

My RPi made a nice show and tell prop at our local club meeting last
night. After 15 years of trying to generate interest in Linux among
hams, here comes this cool little computer that hams are falling all
over themselves to play with and they don't care that it doesn't run
Windows! :-D

Regardless, its price and growing list of accessories makes it an
attractive experiementer's platform as it is a fully functional general
purpose computer with a very well supported general purpose operating
system available. Quite a combination, IMO.

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


Tim N9PUZ
 

On 4/16/2013 6:35 PM, Jim Sheldon wrote:
Well, I did it. Took the plunge and ordered one of those little
Raspberry Pi credit card sized Linux computer boards...
The Raspberry Pi is a very cool little computer. Especially if you always keep in mind that is a sub-1MHz processor which is probably not the same as what you use day to day.

Internet searches will yield days worth of reading on the R-Pi. Make sure to look at sites like ThinkGeek, Adafruit, etc. as they have lots of good tips from people who have gone before you. Also be sure to read all of the (free) back issues of MagPi, an online magazine devoted to the R-Pi computer. <http://www.themagpi.com/>;.

Coastal Chipworks, makers of the TNC-X TNC, are now offering a TNC kit that plugs into the expansion header, not the USB port, on the Pi. <http://www.tnc-x.com/TNCPi.htm>; I received one this week and plan to use it along with some available Linux software to build a small, inexpensive, diskless Winlink 2000 email gateway and replace the old desktop computer that runs the current one 24x7. Of course with a TNC attached there are all sorts of ham radio applications possible like packet clusters, APRS, etc.

73,

Tim N9PUZ


Michael McShan <n5jky@...>
 

I just got a Pi this week; took it to work to hook up to an extra monitor and keyboard I had in the office to see if it works.  Just for the heck of it I installed several commonly used UNIX bioinformatics packages on it to see how it would handle some heavy data crunching, and the Pi passed the test quite respectably!  I know bioinformatics is of little interest here, but it shows that this is really a nice little platform for serious computing.  I hope to get it to work as a TNC/APRS unit.

I ordered a Motorola ATRIX Laptop Dock to go with my Pi.  The dock will provide a HDMI display, keyboard, trackpad and battery for the Pi in one neat unit.  There is a description here:


I'll let everyone know how it turns out.  Still waiting for it.

72/73,
Mike N5JKY
OK City


On Apr 16, 2013, at 9:44 PM, Ray Cadmus <rcadmus@...> wrote:

 

The Pi is a neat little computer - unfortunately not enough zip to handle fldigi.  There is an alternative that works.  Check out the linpsk demo on AmateurLogic.tv episode 53.  George has tried fldigi and gave up.  linpsk seems to work OK.   An older episode of AmateurLogic.tv has George making a nice case for the Pi from a common electrical box.  Then a later episode still he builds a 12v to 5v regulator to power his from the shack power supply.



Bill Cromwell
 

On Wed, 2013-04-17 at 08:05 -0500, Tim McDonough N9PUZ wrote:
--snip----


The Raspberry Pi is a very cool little computer. Especially if you
always keep in mind that is a sub-1MHz processor which is probably
not
the same as what you use day to day.
----snip--

73,

Tim N9PUZ
Hi Jim,

On the Raspberry Pi web site in a FAQ it was mentioned the processor can
be overclocked from something like it's normal ~400 MHz and some of them
will run okay up to 800 MHz. So maybe you meant it is a 'sub 1GHz'
machine. My old radio Shack Color Computer was a sub 1 MHz machine at
somewhere around 750 kHz. My Apple II is way faster between 1 and 2 MHz!
I get dizzy running that one. Did I miss something when I read that
about ~400 MHz?

73,

Bill KU8H


Tim N9PUZ
 

On 4/17/2013 10:39 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

On the Raspberry Pi web site in a FAQ it was mentioned the processor can
be overclocked from something like it's normal ~400 MHz and some of them
will run okay up to 800 MHz. So maybe you meant it is a 'sub 1GHz'
machine.
You are correct. I did in fact mean sub 1 GHz. Just like when I'm sending code, my fingers and my brain occasionally don't connect well!

73,

Tim N9PUZ


Bill Cromwell
 

On Wed, 2013-04-17 at 10:53 -0500, Tim McDonough N9PUZ wrote:
On 4/17/2013 10:39 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

On the Raspberry Pi web site in a FAQ it was mentioned the processor can
be overclocked from something like it's normal ~400 MHz and some of them
will run okay up to 800 MHz. So maybe you meant it is a 'sub 1GHz'
machine.
You are correct. I did in fact mean sub 1 GHz. Just like when I'm
sending code, my fingers and my brain occasionally don't connect well!

73,

Tim N9PUZ
Hi,

I don't usually point at things like that but I really was asking a
question. It's possible for me to misinterpret what I read in that FAQ.
Most of the things I spot are typos and I let most of those slide right
on by. Once in a while a typo is pretty humorous and I'll jump right on
those (evil grin).

I remember how impressed I was with performance when I got a 100 MHz 486
PC in place the old 4.88 MHz XT! The higher speed and wider bus...

My XYL ran indexing on documents in Word Star and we went out for lunch
while it was running. I invited her to run that job on my new computer
and it took something like 2 minutes! We went out for lunch that day to
celebrate and make plans for *her* new computer (grin). I have several
light speed computers here and one has a dual core gizmo in it that
loafs most of the time.

I plan to make the most use of a Pi for field and portable operation in
some of the parks around here. Somebody has said it will run PSK 31 and
some other stuff and I'm sure logging will be trivial.

73,

Bill KU8H