Boatanchor ID help


Tom Sevart
 

Someone gave me an old radio a while back that was in pretty rough shape, to put it mildly. It had a rat's nest in it, is all rusty, and was not even really good for parts, except the tubes I salvaged from it. It didn't come with a case, so I don't even know what kind of rig this used to be. But I was curious as to what make/model radio this was.

I haven't been able to find any pictures of any radios which match it after looking through the book Shortwave Receivers Past & Present and searching all the pics on rigpix.com. But here's what I know about this radio. It's got a large, ganged brown tuning knob on the front, which leads me to believe that it was either a ham rig or shortwave receiver. It's also got four pots on front, and the center control just under the tuning dial is a 5 position switch. All the tubes I pulled from the radio had the Philco name on them, and on one of the barely legible labels on the back of the chassis also said Philco. Running down the center middle of the radio are three connected variable capacitors. Above the tuning knob is an obvious spot for a frequency dial with a glass rod in the center. There is an antenna connection on back consisting of four screw terminals.

The only radios I've managed to find online made by Philco are AM band broadcast receivers, but I don't think that's what this radio was. There's little need for ganged tuning controls, and most if not all AM band receivers only had a couple of controls.

I'm pretty sure this was a shortwave receiver, ham band receiver, or ham transceiver. The 5 position switch would correspond to either 5 ham bands, or 5 different shortwave ranges.

Anyway, here are the pics:

http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor_zps76093aaa.jpg
http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor2_zpsa01bcdbc.jpg
http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor3_zpscc30c159.jpg

Any help in ID'ing this sad relic is appreciated.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS


David Bixler <qrp@...>
 

Hi Tom:

That looks like an AM / short wave receiver made for home consumer use, probably dating to around 1940, give or take 5 years or so. The fact that the tube sockets are octals precludes the early 1930 era.

Philco and several other manufacturers produced receivers that covered the AM broadcast bands plus several shortwave bands. The chassis were often mounted in tall cabinets with large speakers installed below the chassis. Back before the advent of television, these were the entertainment centers of the home. I remember listening to the adventures of the Lone Ranger on similar sets back in the 1940's. Pretty good receivers as I recall.

73, Dave W0CH

On 10/30/2013 07:21 PM, Tom Sevart wrote:
Someone gave me an old radio a while back that was in pretty rough
shape, to put it mildly. It had a rat's nest in it, is all rusty, and
was not even really good for parts, except the tubes I salvaged from it.
It didn't come with a case, so I don't even know what kind of rig this
used to be. But I was curious as to what make/model radio this was.

I haven't been able to find any pictures of any radios which match it
after looking through the book Shortwave Receivers Past & Present and
searching all the pics on rigpix.com. But here's what I know about this
radio. It's got a large, ganged brown tuning knob on the front, which
leads me to believe that it was either a ham rig or shortwave receiver.
It's also got four pots on front, and the center control just under
the tuning dial is a 5 position switch. All the tubes I pulled from the
radio had the Philco name on them, and on one of the barely legible
labels on the back of the chassis also said Philco. Running down the
center middle of the radio are three connected variable capacitors.
Above the tuning knob is an obvious spot for a frequency dial with a
glass rod in the center. There is an antenna connection on back
consisting of four screw terminals.

The only radios I've managed to find online made by Philco are AM band
broadcast receivers, but I don't think that's what this radio was.
There's little need for ganged tuning controls, and most if not all AM
band receivers only had a couple of controls.

I'm pretty sure this was a shortwave receiver, ham band receiver, or ham
transceiver. The 5 position switch would correspond to either 5 ham
bands, or 5 different shortwave ranges.

Anyway, here are the pics:

http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor_zps76093aaa.jpg
http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor2_zpsa01bcdbc.jpg
http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor3_zpscc30c159.jpg

Any help in ID'ing this sad relic is appreciated.


Jim Sheldon
 

Tom that looks to be an old Philco AM/Short Wave receiver, circa late 1930's early 1940's.  It would have been mounted in one of those large wooden cabinets with probably a 12" speaker in the bottom.  The speaker would have had an electromagnet whose coil acted as the filter choke in the high voltage power supply rather than a permanent magnet like those of today have.  Those little rectangles around the central knob were for preset labels and/or buttons that automatically tuned in a preset station sort of like the older car radios used to do.  That's my guess anyway.
 
Jim - W0EB

> Someone gave me an old radio a while back that was in pretty rough
> shape, to put it mildly.  It had a rat's nest in it, is all rusty,
> and was not even really good for parts, except the tubes I salvaged
> from it. It didn't come with a case, so I don't even know what kind
> of rig this used to be.  But I was curious as to what make/model
> radio this was.
>
> I haven't been able to find any pictures of any radios which match
> it after looking through the book Shortwave Receivers Past &
> Present and searching all the pics on rigpix.com.  But here's what
> I know about this radio.  It's got a large, ganged brown tuning
> knob on the front, which leads me to believe that it was either a
> ham rig or shortwave receiver. It's also got four pots on front,
> and the center control just under the tuning dial is a 5 position
> switch.  All the tubes I pulled from the radio had the Philco name
> on them, and on one of the barely legible labels on the back of the
> chassis also said Philco.  Running down the center middle of the
> radio are three connected variable capacitors. Above the tuning
> knob is an obvious spot for a frequency dial with a glass rod in
> the center.  There is an antenna connection on back consisting of
> four screw terminals.
>
> The only radios I've managed to find online made by Philco are AM
> band broadcast receivers, but I don't think that's what this radio
> was. There's little need for ganged tuning controls, and most if
> not all AM band receivers only had a couple of controls.
>
> I'm pretty sure this was a shortwave receiver, ham band receiver,
> or ham transceiver.  The 5 position switch would correspond to
> either 5 ham bands, or 5 different shortwave ranges.
>
> Anyway, here are the pics:
>
> pg
> jpg
> jpg
>
> Any help in ID'ing this sad relic is appreciated.
>
> --
> Tom Sevart N2UHC
> St. Paul, KS
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> 4SQRP Website: http://4sqrp.com
> OzarkCon is coming April 4-5, 2014 in Branson, MO
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Sorry, Tom, I can't ID it.

I do recall my maternal grandparents having a floor console Philco
receiver that worked and looked pretty darn good. When we had the
estate sale in 1996 the family thought I would buy it. I did not as I
really had no place for it and I wanted to spend my sheckles on more
modern ham gear.

That said, I recall it having four or five bands, a large speaker that
just sounded great, and a built-in antenna. Either I or one of my
cousins would fire it up and see what was happening during family
gatherings ('70s to mid '80s). One night I pulled in a couple of hams
chatting on 160m AM. Later I listened to them at home on my own
receiver. That was about the time I knew what amateur radio was but was
not yet licensed or may have had my Novice. I really don't recall.

I know this doesn't help you in any way, but I can't help but reminisce
a bit.

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


AG1P Ron
 

Hi Tom,

 

My dad owned a model 38 Philco.  My brother has it now.  Here is link to pictures of that line. Seeing the pics brings back good memories.

http://www.philcoradio.com/gallery/1938a.htm

 

72 – Ron AG1P

 

From: 4sqrp@... [mailto:4sqrp@...] On Behalf Of David Bixler
Sent: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 5:36 PM
To: 4sqrp@...; Tom Sevart
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Boatanchor ID help

 

 

Hi Tom:

That looks like an AM / short wave receiver made for home consumer use,
probably dating to around 1940, give or take 5 years or so. The fact
that the tube sockets are octals precludes the early 1930 era.

Philco and several other manufacturers produced receivers that covered
the AM broadcast bands plus several shortwave bands. The chassis were
often mounted in tall cabinets with large speakers installed below the
chassis. Back before the advent of television, these were the
entertainment centers of the home. I remember listening to the
adventures of the Lone Ranger on similar sets back in the 1940's.
Pretty good receivers as I recall.

73, Dave W0CH

On 10/30/2013 07:21 PM, Tom Sevart wrote:
> Someone gave me an old radio a while back that was in pretty rough
> shape, to put it mildly. It had a rat's nest in it, is all rusty, and
> was not even really good for parts, except the tubes I salvaged from it.
> It didn't come with a case, so I don't even know what kind of rig this
> used to be. But I was curious as to what make/model radio this was.
>
> I haven't been able to find any pictures of any radios which match it
> after looking through the book Shortwave Receivers Past & Present and
> searching all the pics on rigpix.com. But here's what I know about this
> radio. It's got a large, ganged brown tuning knob on the front, which
> leads me to believe that it was either a ham rig or shortwave receiver.
> It's also got four pots on front, and the center control just under
> the tuning dial is a 5 position switch. All the tubes I pulled from the
> radio had the Philco name on them, and on one of the barely legible
> labels on the back of the chassis also said Philco. Running down the
> center middle of the radio are three connected variable capacitors.
> Above the tuning knob is an obvious spot for a frequency dial with a
> glass rod in the center. There is an antenna connection on back
> consisting of four screw terminals.
>
> The only radios I've managed to find online made by Philco are AM band
> broadcast receivers, but I don't think that's what this radio was.
> There's little need for ganged tuning controls, and most if not all AM
> band receivers only had a couple of controls.
>
> I'm pretty sure this was a shortwave receiver, ham band receiver, or ham
> transceiver. The 5 position switch would correspond to either 5 ham
> bands, or 5 different shortwave ranges.
>
> Anyway, here are the pics:
>
> http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor_zps76093aaa.jpg
> http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor2_zpsa01bcdbc.jpg
> http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor3_zpscc30c159.jpg
>
> Any help in ID'ing this sad relic is appreciated.
>


Bill Cromwell
 

On 10/30/2013 08:36 PM, David Bixler wrote:

Hi Tom:

That looks like an AM / short wave receiver made for home consumer use,
probably dating to around 1940, give or take 5 years or so. The fact
that the tube sockets are octals precludes the early 1930 era.

Philco and several other manufacturers produced receivers that covered
the AM broadcast bands plus several shortwave bands. The chassis were
often mounted in tall cabinets with large speakers installed below the
chassis. Back before the advent of television, these were the
entertainment centers of the home. I remember listening to the
adventures of the Lone Ranger on similar sets back in the 1940's.
Pretty good receivers as I recall.

73, Dave W0CH
Heh,

The television shows were on the radio first. When television first got going not so very many people had one. Like Dave, I listened to those radio shows. When I was around 11 or 12 my father had one of the radios Dave has described with innards similar to what Tom has there. One night we hooked up a two sets of window screens to the antenna terminals and prowled those short wave bands. We found traffic from a mountain climbing team in Europe doing something to the Materhorn. A few days later it was all over the news and at school. But - I knew about it *first* <grin>. That is single, most responsible event that drove me eventually to my ham license. And yes, viewed from the back the radio was similar to the one Tom has. There were a lot of them around once upon a time. SDR? Bah! Hunbug! <evil grin>

73,

Bill KU8H


Jim Sheldon
 

Tom, it looks to be one of the 3 on the top left pictures in the link.  One of the model 38 series.

W0EB

Sent from my iPad

On Oct 30, 2013, at 7:45 PM, "AG1P - Ron" <ag1p@...> wrote:

Hi Tom,

 

My dad owned a model 38 Philco.  My brother has it now.  Here is link to pictures of that line. Seeing the pics brings back good memories.

http://www.philcoradio.com/gallery/1938a.htm

 

72 – Ron AG1P

 

From: 4sqrp@... [mailto:4sqrp@...] On Behalf Of David Bixler
Sent: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 5:36 PM
To: 4sqrp@...; Tom Sevart
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Boatanchor ID help

 

 

Hi Tom:

That looks like an AM / short wave receiver made for home consumer use,
probably dating to around 1940, give or take 5 years or so. The fact
that the tube sockets are octals precludes the early 1930 era.

Philco and several other manufacturers produced receivers that covered
the AM broadcast bands plus several shortwave bands. The chassis were
often mounted in tall cabinets with large speakers installed below the
chassis. Back before the advent of television, these were the
entertainment centers of the home. I remember listening to the
adventures of the Lone Ranger on similar sets back in the 1940's.
Pretty good receivers as I recall.

73, Dave W0CH

On 10/30/2013 07:21 PM, Tom Sevart wrote:
> Someone gave me an old radio a while back that was in pretty rough
> shape, to put it mildly. It had a rat's nest in it, is all rusty, and
> was not even really good for parts, except the tubes I salvaged from it.
> It didn't come with a case, so I don't even know what kind of rig this
> used to be. But I was curious as to what make/model radio this was.
>
> I haven't been able to find any pictures of any radios which match it
> after looking through the book Shortwave Receivers Past & Present and
> searching all the pics on rigpix.com. But here's what I know about this
> radio. It's got a large, ganged brown tuning knob on the front, which
> leads me to believe that it was either a ham rig or shortwave receiver.
> It's also got four pots on front, and the center control just under
> the tuning dial is a 5 position switch. All the tubes I pulled from the
> radio had the Philco name on them, and on one of the barely legible
> labels on the back of the chassis also said Philco. Running down the
> center middle of the radio are three connected variable capacitors.
> Above the tuning knob is an obvious spot for a frequency dial with a
> glass rod in the center. There is an antenna connection on back
> consisting of four screw terminals.
>
> The only radios I've managed to find online made by Philco are AM band
> broadcast receivers, but I don't think that's what this radio was.
> There's little need for ganged tuning controls, and most if not all AM
> band receivers only had a couple of controls.
>
> I'm pretty sure this was a shortwave receiver, ham band receiver, or ham
> transceiver. The 5 position switch would correspond to either 5 ham
> bands, or 5 different shortwave ranges.
>
> Anyway, here are the pics:
>
> http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor_zps76093aaa.jpg
> http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor2_zpsa01bcdbc.jpg
> http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff99/n2uhc/boatanchor3_zpscc30c159.jpg
>
> Any help in ID'ing this sad relic is appreciated.
>


 

* On 2013 30 Oct 19:46 -0500, AG1P - Ron wrote:
Hi Tom,



My dad owned a model 38 Philco. My brother has it now. Here is link to
pictures of that line. Seeing the pics brings back good memories.

http://www.philcoradio.com/gallery/1938a.htm
Thanks for that link, Ron. Browsing through, this model looks very
close to the one my grandparents had:

http://www.philcoradio.com/gallery/1939c.htm#a

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


Tom Sevart
 

Someone on QRP-L ID'ed it as a Philco 37-116.

http://www.antique-radios.net/radpix/philco/37-116ft.jpg
http://www.antique-radios.net/radpix/philco/37-116bk.jpg

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS


Rick Bennett
 

Hey, that was kind of a fun little mystery.  My parents probably listened to something like that in their living room .  I do remember getting our first color TV - that was pretty exciting, all 19" of it.  

I gotta say they made radios a lot prettier back then.  It makes me think that one of these simple little QRP rigs might look good in a nice stained wooden box like that.  

de KC0PET, Rick




From: "Tom Sevart"
Cc: 4sqrp@...
Sent: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 8:00:43 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Boatanchor ID  help

 

Someone on QRP-L ID'ed it as a Philco 37-116.

http://www.antique-radios.net/radpix/philco/37-116ft.jpg
http://www.antique-radios.net/radpix/philco/37-116bk.jpg

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS



John Lonigro
 

I think Tom should plug it in and see if it still works (hi). 

My grandfather had a nice Zenith set similar to that one.  My brother didn't like the looks of it, took out the guts, put it in the corner of our hobby area, and hung the speaker near the ceiling.  It sure looked better with all the insides showing (and glowing), but probably lost some of the audio quality, with the speaker outside of any enclosure.

John AA0VE



On 10/30/2013 09:08 PM, Rick Bennett wrote:
 
Hey, that was kind of a fun little mystery.  My parents probably listened to something like that in their living room .  I do remember getting our first color TV - that was pretty exciting, all 19" of it.  

I gotta say they made radios a lot prettier back then.  It makes me think that one of these simple little QRP rigs might look good in a nice stained wooden box like that.  

de KC0PET, Rick




From: "Tom Sevart"
Cc: 4sqrp@...
Sent: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 8:00:43 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Boatanchor ID  help

 

Someone on QRP-L ID'ed it as a Philco 37-116.

http://www.antique-radios.net/radpix/philco/37-116ft.jpg
http://www.antique-radios.net/radpix/philco/37-116bk.jpg

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS




W0IIT
 

Hi Guys and Gals,

Like Nate's response this won't help a bit in the mystery. Looks like someone solved it already, anyway.

I remember, like it was just last week, lying in front of a radio (much like the Philco pictured) listening to the kids programs they ran on Saturday mornings. Sunday afternoon was a real treat listening to "The Shadow" and "True Detective". Those are the only two program names I remember but there was several of them and they served to keep me out of trouble on Sunday afternoons. I remember the family gathering around to listen to "Fibber Magee and Molly" and get this, a program featuring a ventriloquist (heck even I could be a ventriloquist on the radio:-)! That, of course, was the Charley McCarthy show. At the very end, my favorite part of the program was "Snerds Words for the Birds" which featured a one line, usually, bit of hilarious wisdom. 9 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. nightly during the week was a program called, I think, "Solders of Fortune". Featuring three guys that went from one thrilling adventure to the next. I and two of my buddies listened to that show religiously and each of us adopted the name of one of the three heroes. We even convinced our teacher to accept homework signed with our temporary names.

Sorry, but don't ever mention the Saturday afternoon double feature, with a serial, matinee at the local movie theater to me or you will have to walk down memory lane with me again:-)

cu es 72, Bart W0IIT
Pittsburg, KS
4Sqrp = #72, FP= #11, ARS=#568, SKCC=1139, NAQCC=#588 FIST=#5819, Zombie=#500, Geratol=#1000


Jim Sheldon
 

Hey Bart, do you remember who played the Lone Ranger on radio?  Or Matt Dillon in Gunsmoke on the radio?  I didn't think we were getting that old hi hi.
 
Jim - W0EB

> Hi Guys and Gals,
>
> Like Nate's response this won't help a bit in the mystery.  Looks
> like someone solved it already, anyway.
>
> I remember, like it was just last week, lying in front of a radio
> (much like the Philco pictured) listening to the kids programs they
> ran on Saturday mornings.  Sunday afternoon was a real treat
> listening to "The Shadow" and "True Detective".  Those are the only
> two program names I remember but there was several of them and they
> served to keep me out of trouble on Sunday afternoons.  I remember
> the family gathering around to listen to "Fibber Magee and Molly"
> and get this, a program featuring a ventriloquist (heck even I
> could be a ventriloquist on the radio:-)! That, of course, was the
> Charley McCarthy show. At the very end, my favorite part of the
> program was "Snerds Words for the Birds" which featured a one line,
> usually, bit of hilarious wisdom.  9 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. nightly
> during the week was a program called, I think, "Solders of
> Fortune".  Featuring three guys that went from one thrilling
> adventure to the next.  I and two of my buddies listened to that
> show religiously and each of us adopted the name of one of the
> three heroes.  We even convinced our teacher to accept homework
> signed with our temporary names.
>
> Sorry, but don't ever mention the Saturday afternoon double
> feature, with a serial,  matinee at the local movie theater to me
> or you will have to walk down memory lane with me again:-)
>
> cu es 72, Bart W0IIT
> Pittsburg, KS
> 4Sqrp = #72, FP= #11, ARS=#568, SKCC=1139, NAQCC=#588 FIST=#5819,
> Zombie=#500, Geratol=#1000
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> 4SQRP Website: http://4sqrp.com
> OzarkCon is coming April 4-5, 2014 in Branson, MO
> View Details at http://www.ozarkcon.com/index.phpYahoo Groups Links
>
> <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
>
> <*> Your email settings:
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>
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Wayne Dillon
 

Heck with it Bart, I'll take that stroll down memory lane with you anytime!
Sunday afternoons wre the time for a family gathering around the "Wireless" in my home, with shows like "The Navy Lark" a 30 minute skit featuring an inept Naval officer and his attempts to maouver HMS troutbridge, then there was more Comedy with "The Clitheroe Kid" and of course "Hancocks Half Hour". I still have a recording of Tony Hancock and the gang doing "The Radio Ham" and "The Blood Donor". After sunday linch we had Edmundo Ross and the latin beat, then "Billie Cotton's Band Show" an hour of big band music. Oh the memmories come flooding back, is it just me or were times simpler and better then or am I just a curmudgeonly old geezer?  :)
Saturday morning cinema, oh yes I remember Zorro, the Lone Ranger, and other serial shows for us kids.
I think my fondest memory of the wireless is sitting with my father listening to the comedies and watching him laugh so hard he almost cried, yes that would be the memory I treasure the most.
Thanks for the reminder folks, they wre grand times to be youngster with access to a wireless...

72/3 es God Bless all de Wayne - KC0PMH



On Thu, Oct 31, 2013 at 8:30 AM, Bart Lawson <blawson2@...> wrote:
 

Hi Guys and Gals,

Like Nate's response this won't help a bit in the mystery. Looks like someone solved it already, anyway.

 

Sorry, but don't ever mention the Saturday afternoon double feature, with a serial, matinee at the local movie theater to me or you will have to walk down memory lane with me again:-)

cu es 72, Bart W0IIT
Pittsburg, KS
4Sqrp = #72, FP= #11, ARS=#568, SKCC=1139, NAQCC=#588 FIST=#5819, Zombie=#500, Geratol=#1000




--
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QRP -  EFFICIENCY AND SKILL, NOT POWER. 
 
I'm British by birth but American by CHOICE!

Jesus came to pay a debt He didn't owe because we owe a debt we cannot pay...

The Lord bless you and keep you
The Lord make His face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you
The Lord lift up his contenance upon you and give you peace.

God Bless from Wayne Dillon - KC0PMH

Joshua 24:14-15
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1 Jn 2:17
 

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Tom Sevart
 

On 10/30/2013 21:08, Rick Bennett wrote:
Hey, that was kind of a fun little mystery. My /parents/ probably
listened to something like that in their living room <grin>. I do
remember getting our first color TV - that was pretty exciting, all 19"
of it.

I gotta say they made radios a lot prettier back then. It makes me
think that one of these simple little QRP rigs might look good in a nice
stained wooden box like that.
Too bad this one was in such terrible shape. It would have been nice to restore it and build a new wooden case for it.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS


Tom Sevart
 

On 10/30/2013 21:23, John R. Lonigro wrote:
I think Tom should plug it in and see if it still works (hi).
I think that would be a shocking experience.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS


Tom Sevart
 

On 10/31/2013 08:30, Bart Lawson wrote:
I remember the family gathering around to
listen to "Fibber Magee and Molly" and get this, a program featuring a
ventriloquist (heck even I could be a ventriloquist on the radio:-)!
That, of course, was the Charley McCarthy show.
I recently heard an episode of the Charlie McCarthy show on an episode of "When Radio Was" and wondered if Edgar Bergen actually had his dummy in front of the live audience or just did the voices. But yes, being a ventriloquist on the radio must have been pretty easy.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS


W0IIT
 

Tom et. al.,

The sad thing about these beautiful works of American labor was that back in the 80s and 90s a person could have filled their home with these radios. I spotted two sitting in a man's garage and found out I could have them for the price of loading them in my pickup. He didn't want to throw them in the dump. I hate to think of what happened to them but I knew what would happen if I showed up with them:-) We lived in a very small house and I had already turned one bedroom into a radio, computer, workbench play room. I was pretty sure that showing up with two console radios would be pushing my luck even with a very forgiving wife.

cu es 72, Bart W0IIT
Pittsburg, KS
4Sqrp = #72, FP= #11, ARS=#568, SKCC=1139, NAQCC=#588 FIST=#5819, Zombie=#500, Geratol=#1000


John Lonigro
 

Several years ago, a friend of mine who has lived in California for years came back to St. Louis for a few days. He called me and said the trip wasn't a pleasure trip. He had to help clean out his recently deceased uncle's basement. The day after it was all cleaned out, he told me his uncle used to be a TV repairman and had all kinds of radios in the basement, including some consoles, plus lots of spare parts, test equipment, etc. My friend had called some company that essentially charged him to take all that stuff away. In a way, I'm glad I didn't know about it until after the basement was cleaned out. The temptation would have been too great, especially after my friend said he was listening to one of the consoles while cleaning up.

John AA0VE

On 11/01/2013 06:55 AM, Bart Lawson wrote:

Tom et. al.,

The sad thing about these beautiful works of American labor was that back in the 80s and 90s a person could have filled their home with these radios. I spotted two sitting in a man's garage and found out I could have them for the price of loading them in my pickup. He didn't want to throw them in the dump. I hate to think of what happened to them but I knew what would happen if I showed up with them:-) We lived in a very small house and I had already turned one bedroom into a radio, computer, workbench play room. I was pretty sure that showing up with two console radios would be pushing my luck even with a very forgiving wife.

cu es 72, Bart W0IIT
Pittsburg, KS
4Sqrp = #72, FP= #11, ARS=#568, SKCC=1139, NAQCC=#588 FIST=#5819, Zombie=#500, Geratol=#1000


Jim Lowman
 

None of you should feel bad. We heard Pat speak about his collection of radios at Pacificon last year.

Check this out:

http://www.wa6mhz.org/PIX_of_the_Museum.php

72/73 de Jim - AD6CW

On 11/1/2013 4:55 AM, Bart Lawson wrote:
Tom et. al.,

The sad thing about these beautiful works of American labor was that back in the 80s and 90s a person could have filled their home with these radios. I spotted two sitting in a man's garage and found out I could have them for the price of loading them in my pickup. He didn't want to throw them in the dump. I hate to think of what happened to them but I knew what would happen if I showed up with them:-) We lived in a very small house and I had already turned one bedroom into a radio, computer, workbench play room. I was pretty sure that showing up with two console radios would be pushing my luck even with a very forgiving wife.

cu es 72, Bart W0IIT
Pittsburg, KS
4Sqrp = #72, FP= #11, ARS=#568, SKCC=1139, NAQCC=#588 FIST=#5819, Zombie=#500, Geratol=#1000