What are the letter codes for numbers for CW?


Phil Anderson
 

Hi OMs,

Many CW stations abbreviate their power with a number or letter
followed by a T and a second T, wherein T=10. So if a station
says his power is 3TT, he means 3*10*10 or 300 watts.

However, I've heard that some ops use a letter code for that first number,
but I can't find a definition on the web? Anybody know?

For example, in the ARRL contest going on this morning, I heard
OL1C on ten meters give his report at 5NN JTT,..........so what's the J?

Dah?

Unc Phil, W0XI


w9qs@...
 


I think it's a short 1.

Mike, W9QS


----- Original Message -----
From: aldenmcduffie@...
To: 4sqrp@...
Cc: aldenmcduffie@...
Sent:Sat Feb 15 03:59:03 UTC 2014
Subject: [4sqrp] What are the letter codes for numbers for CW?


 

Hi OMs,

Many CW stations abbreviate their power with a number or letter
followed by a T and a second T, wherein T=10. So if a station
says his power is 3TT, he means 3*10*10 or 300 watts.

However, I've heard that some ops use a letter code for that first number,
but I can't find a definition on the web? Anybody know?

For example, in the ARRL contest going on this morning, I heard
OL1C on ten meters give his report at 5NN JTT,..........so what's the J?

Dah?

Unc Phil, W0XI


Johnny AC0BQ
 

Gm Phil 
The spring thaw is in the way!
I always thought a T or a long dash was short for just one zero?
Thats my 2 c worth !
72
Johnny AC0BQ


On Saturday, February 15, 2014, Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...> wrote:
 

Hi OMs,

Many CW stations abbreviate their power with a number or letter
followed by a T and a second T, wherein T=10. So if a station
says his power is 3TT, he means 3*10*10 or 300 watts.

However, I've heard that some ops use a letter code for that first number,
but I can't find a definition on the web? Anybody know?

For example, in the ARRL contest going on this morning, I heard
OL1C on ten meters give his report at 5NN JTT,..........so what's the J?

Dah?

Unc Phil, W0XI



--
QRP....."more smiles per watt"


John Lonigro
 

Phil:

Maybe he was sloppy and missed a "dah" at the end. didadadah instead of didadadadah. That would make it 1TT or 100. One hundred Watts seems like a pretty standard value and is what I'd assume.

Just an idea, from a person who sometimes produces sloppy code.

72,

John AA0VE

On 02/15/2014 09:59 AM, Phil Anderson wrote:

Hi OMs,

Many CW stations abbreviate their power with a number or letter
followed by a T and a second T, wherein T=10. So if a station
says his power is 3TT, he means 3*10*10 or 300 watts.

However, I've heard that some ops use a letter code for that first number,
but I can't find a definition on the web? Anybody know?

For example, in the ARRL contest going on this morning, I heard
OL1C on ten meters give his report at 5NN JTT,..........so what's the J?

Dah?

Unc Phil, W0XI


wb9dlc@...
 

Also, a lot of 100 watt stations will become 99 watt stations and send power as "NN" to shorten the exchange.

Mike - WB9DLC


Chuck Carpenter
 

Phil,

Look up More Code Cut Numbers.


 his power is 3TT, he means 3*10*10 or 300 watts.





Chuck Carpenter, W5USJ
EM22cv, Rains Co. TX


Rick Bennett
 

IMHO one should probably avoid the more obscure shortcuts.  N for 9 is pretty common, but I would honestly not know any of the rest of them and I am guessing a lot of other operators out there won't either.  As my fine CW teachers pointed out if we are going to be good communicators it is best to avoid abbreviations and shortcuts that most people won't recognize.  If in doubt just spell it out.

My $.02

de KC0PET, Rick



From: "Chuck Carpenter"
To: 4sqrp@..., "Phil Anderson"
Sent: Saturday, February 15, 2014 6:08:55 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] What are the letter codes for numbers for CW?

 

Phil,

Look up More Code Cut Numbers.


 his power is 3TT, he means 3*10*10 or 300 watts.





Chuck Carpenter, W5USJ
EM22cv, Rains Co. TX



Bill Cromwell
 

On 02/15/2014 07:18 PM, Rick Bennett wrote:
IMHO one should probably avoid the more obscure shortcuts. N for 9 is pretty common, but I would honestly not know any of the rest of them and I am guessing a lot of other operators out there won't either. As my fine CW teachers pointed out if we are going to be good communicators it is best to avoid abbreviations and shortcuts that most people won't recognize. If in doubt just spell it out.

My $.02

de KC0PET, Rick
Rick,

Make that four cents. There once was the long dash (not a 'T') as a substitute for zero but if you don't use a straight key or a bug you're out of luck sending one of those. Most of the time when we try to make shortcuts and abbreviations we end up with meaningless alphabet soup, babbling, and straight gibberish. 'N' and '9' are completely different things and that's why they are spelled differently. I do know from overexposure what the 5NN is but if that 'N' get used in another context...well I just shrug, take a sip of coffee, and move on.

That's a lot for an additional two cents.

73,

Bill KU8H


Jim Sheldon
 

Having been a "morse intercept operator" many years ago, I had to learn the "cut" numbers. The standard ones are:
1-A
2-U
3-W
4-V
5-E
6-B
7-Z
8-D
9-N
0-T

The ones generally in use by today's hams are A, E, N and T for 1, 5, 9 and 0 respectively.

Jim, W0EB


Sent from my iPad

On Feb 15, 2014, at 6:35 PM, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@gmail.com> wrote:

On 02/15/2014 07:18 PM, Rick Bennett wrote:
IMHO one should probably avoid the more obscure shortcuts. N for 9 is
pretty common, but I would honestly not know any of the rest of them
and I am guessing a lot of other operators out there won't either. As
my fine CW teachers pointed out if we are going to be good
communicators it is best to avoid abbreviations and shortcuts that
most people won't recognize. If in doubt just spell it out.

My $.02

de KC0PET, Rick
Rick,

Make that four cents. There once was the long dash (not a 'T') as a
substitute for zero but if you don't use a straight key or a bug you're
out of luck sending one of those. Most of the time when we try to make
shortcuts and abbreviations we end up with meaningless alphabet soup,
babbling, and straight gibberish. 'N' and '9' are completely different
things and that's why they are spelled differently. I do know from
overexposure what the 5NN is but if that 'N' get used in another
context...well I just shrug, take a sip of coffee, and move on.

That's a lot for an additional two cents.

73,

Bill KU8H




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Phil Anderson
 

Thanks Rick and Bill.............

Seems as if the guys operating from 28000 to 28025 in the
WPX contest today and tomorrow use a lot of these
codes and their code rate  is faster than I'm used to too.........but I got
by by listening to their calls a number of times....they were
all european calls since this is a WPX exchange from there
with either Canadians or US op this side of the big pond.

I noticed that a great many of them were using a KW or at least 5TT.
Ha, little ole me.....I was running my FT450D at an outragious 50 Watts!
Most of them heard me but I sometimes had to wait in the pileup until
the CA kilowatt guys got their share, hi. Long live moderate power!!! 

I head JTT, aNN, N, 1TT,  3TT and other abbrevs.....seems like a great veriety,
also heard KW......with obvious meaning. Nearly all of them were using
these abbreviations, so I guess it's eat like the Romans when in Rome!

I decided to work 26 contacts, labeling in the margin A.....to Z for the
number of contacts made, then when reaching Z I quit - had other stuff to do
at home. My join WPX again in the morning. Plenty of signals from 8 AM
through 10 AM today  .........was really fun.

72, unc Phil, W0XI





Phil Anderson
 

Thanks Jim,

I found the "cut" number list on the web.......

Unc Phil............


Jim Sheldon
 

Phil,
It's not WPX, it's the ARRL International DX contest.  US and Canadian Stations can work only DX stations & vice versa.  DX exchange is RST plus their power.  US & Canadians send RST & state or province.

Jim - W0EB

Sent from my iPad

On Feb 15, 2014, at 7:00 PM, Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...> wrote:

Thanks Rick and Bill.............

Seems as if the guys operating from 28000 to 28025 in the
WPX contest today and tomorrow use a lot of these
codes and their code rate  is faster than I'm used to too.........but I got
by by listening to their calls a number of times....they were
all european calls since this is a WPX exchange from there
with either Canadians or US op this side of the big pond.

I noticed that a great many of them were using a KW or at least 5TT.
Ha, little ole me.....I was running my FT450D at an outragious 50 Watts!
Most of them heard me but I sometimes had to wait in the pileup until
the CA kilowatt guys got their share, hi. Long live moderate power!!! 

I head JTT, aNN, N, 1TT,  3TT and other abbrevs.....seems like a great veriety,
also heard KW......with obvious meaning. Nearly all of them were using
these abbreviations, so I guess it's eat like the Romans when in Rome!

I decided to work 26 contacts, labeling in the margin A.....to Z for the
number of contacts made, then when reaching Z I quit - had other stuff to do
at home. My join WPX again in the morning. Plenty of signals from 8 AM
through 10 AM today  .........was really fun.

72, unc Phil, W0XI





Bill Cromwell
 

Thanks Phil for reminding me why I stay out of Rome.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 02/15/2014 08:00 PM, Phil Anderson wrote:
so I guess it's eat like the Romans when in Rome!

72, unc Phil, W0XI