Topics

Ozark Patrol Regen Receiver A+


W0PWE
 

I am amazed at how well the Ozark Patrol regen works! If you built one at Ozarkcon and haven't played with it yet you are missing out on some fun. 

My son wanted to take part in the Friday night Ozarkcon building session so we teamed up and put the Ozark Patrol receiver together. It was a fun project, easy to build and the front panel looks great. I figured it would work about like all the other regens I have built in the past but no, this one is different. It is sensitive, the regen control is smooth and predictable and the bandspread tuning is just right. 

I hooked it up to my trap dipole for 80,40 and 30 meters. I messed with the gimic capacitors a little and started tuning around. Lots of short wave stations were heard but the english speaking ones were not too interesting to listen to right then. I practiced the two hand tuning method the guys at the building session taught me and then I tuned in WWV, adjusted the main tuning knob to 10MHz, shut it off and went to bed. The next morning at about 7am I turned it on and WWV was gone but WWVH from Kaui Hawaii was coming in. 

Since then I have been letting it play when I am in the shack in the evening. I'm still hearing a lot of short wave stations but mostly I listen to 40M SSB and CW qsos. One evening while casually listening to 40M I heard F5IN calling CQ and working some stateside stations. RBN showed him at 25 to 31 dB on the skimmers in 8 land so he had a good signal but I think think this receiver will hear weaker ones without any trouble.

I think this receiver deserves a nice case like the ones N5IB made. As soon as my current woodworking project is finished I am going to dress it up with a fancy case. 

Thanks Dave for a great design and thanks Dar, Darrell and the whole buildathon gang for making it happen. 73,
Jerry - W0PWE


Walter - K5EST
 

Jerry, what a nice "infomercial" you gave for the Ozark Patrol regen receiver. I do not have one yet, but knowing the background on it, then the receiver is a welcome place holder in the Ham shack.

Thank you and your son for being a participant at OzarkCon.

72....Walter . K5EST




On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 9:01 PM, <j.b.hall@...> wrote:
 

I am amazed at how well the Ozark Patrol regen works! If you built one at Ozarkcon and haven't played with it yet you are missing out on some fun. 


My son wanted to take part in the Friday night Ozarkcon building session so we teamed up and put the Ozark Patrol receiver together. It was a fun project, easy to build and the front panel looks great. I figured it would work about like all the other regens I have built in the past but no, this one is different. It is sensitive, the regen control is smooth and predictable and the bandspread tuning is just right. 

I hooked it up to my trap dipole for 80,40 and 30 meters. I messed with the gimic capacitors a little and started tuning around. Lots of short wave stations were heard but the english speaking ones were not too interesting to listen to right then. I practiced the two hand tuning method the guys at the building session taught me and then I tuned in WWV, adjusted the main tuning knob to 10MHz, shut it off and went to bed. The next morning at about 7am I turned it on and WWV was gone but WWVH from Kaui Hawaii was coming in. 

Since then I have been letting it play when I am in the shack in the evening. I'm still hearing a lot of short wave stations but mostly I listen to 40M SSB and CW qsos. One evening while casually listening to 40M I heard F5IN calling CQ and working some stateside stations. RBN showed him at 25 to 31 dB on the skimmers in 8 land so he had a good signal but I think think this receiver will hear weaker ones without any trouble.

I think this receiver deserves a nice case like the ones N5IB made. As soon as my current woodworking project is finished I am going to dress it up with a fancy case. 

Thanks Dave for a great design and thanks Dar, Darrell and the whole buildathon gang for making it happen. 73,
Jerry - W0PWE



 

Is there any chance that this will be made available as a kit for wider
purchase or was this a one-shot deal?

72, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


WA0ITP
 

GM Nate,

Thanks for asking. Yes but we only made a small run this time to cover the
build session and FDIM sales. After FDIM we'll do another run.

----------------------------------
I love this radio stuff !
72 WA0ITP
www.wa0itp.com
www.4sqrp.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Nate Bargmann" <@n0nb>
To: <4sqrp@...>
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 10:03 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Ozark Patrol Regen Receiver A+


| Is there any chance that this will be made available as a kit for wider
| purchase or was this a one-shot deal?
|
| 72, de Nate >>
|
| --
|
| "The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
| possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."
|
| Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us
|
|
| ------------------------------------
|
| 4SQRP Website: http://4sqrp.com
| OzarkCon is coming April 4-5, 2014 in Branson, MO
| View Details at http://www.ozarkcon.com/index.phpYahoo Groups Links
|
|
|


Chuck Carpenter
 

Terry,

Put my name on the list...

Thanks!


Thanks for asking. Yes but we only made a small run this time to cover the
build session and FDIM sales. After FDIM we'll do another run.

Chuck Carpenter, W5USJ
EM22cv, Rains Co. TX


chuck adams <chuck.adams.k7qo@...>
 

On 04/15/2014 07:44 AM, Chuck Carpenter wrote:
 

Terry,

Put my name on the list...

Thanks!

>Thanks for asking. Yes but we only made a small run this time to cover the
>build session and FDIM sales. After FDIM we'll do another run.

Chuck Carpenter, W5USJ
EM22cv, Rains Co. TX


---------------------

Put me down also.  Take a list and I'll be happy to
pay up front to get the ball rolling....

the other chuck, k7qo



 

* On 2014 15 Apr 09:12 -0500, WA0ITP wrote:
GM Nate,

Thanks for asking. Yes but we only made a small run this time to cover the
build session and FDIM sales. After FDIM we'll do another run.
I'm looking toward getting some things together for ARRL SKN on Jan 1
and am curious how soon the Patrol will be offered. I realize it is a
"beginners kit" but would like to pair a regen with the AC-1 Jr. I have
via the Magic Box for SKN. Would this regen be a good choice or should
I look elsewhere?

72, Nate

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


Curt
 

Nate

I am no expert in radio history, and even 'that period' where AC-1 was used was before my time (although I did own an R5 SWL receiver that may have only been paired in advertising!).  I am thinking that most beginners/hams with smaller investments would use a commercial receiver with their homebrew transmitter in the 1950 - 1970 era.  A decent receiver was a bit complex even with tube technology, and multiple xtals in a receiver were rather exotic except for very high end receivers. 

If you want to go vintage perhaps consider building a superhet (or even a DC receiver) and outfitting it with a vintage front panel look (yes same ideal as Ozark Patrol appearance). 

A local friend here is building his old novice station - and did find an SX-110.  I remember some of these types of receivers having nice 'bandspread' for the ham bands to allow someone to use it after being licensed from SWL only service.  But you might enjoy something with a bit more selectivity -- our bands may be a bit more crowded than 1950-something. 

In spite of ARRL beginner books promoting the build of a homebrew regen, I am thinking that most folk would have taken the expense of parts toward buying a used receiver -- even the ARRL book admitted its rather high cost.  The age of the regen was clearly pre-WW2. 

73 Curt

PS - one should build a regen just for the experience!  but I don't expect to plug one into my Magic Box


David Martin <davemrtn@...>
 


David Martin <davemrtn@...>
 


Robert
 

Hi Everyone:

I don't know what was discussed in other emails, but here "IS" just a little History:

I got my Novice  license  in the Summer of 1958.   My Novice rig was a regen receiver and a 6V6 transmitter (AC1 style) followed by a 6DQ6 built transmitter, and I did quite well.   The QRM on the Novice 80 and 40 meter bands in the 1960s was at least three to four times as bad as one has today. Also, on 40 Meters we had to deal with QRM from Radio Moscow, the BBC, Radio China etc. which are no longer around.  There maybe twice as many ham radio operaters today than were around in the 1960s, but there are not twice as many CW operators.

Bob K9ZLU
www.luetzow.us
QRZ (k9ZLU)
--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 7/28/14, @CurtisM [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Ozark Patrol Regen Receiver A+
To: 4sqrp@...
Date: Monday, July 28, 2014, 9:51 AM


 



   


     
       
       
       Nate

I am no
expert in radio history, and even 'that period'
where AC-1 was used was before my time (although I did own
an R5 SWL receiver that may have only been paired in
advertising!).  I am thinking that most beginners/hams with
smaller investments would use a commercial receiver with
their homebrew transmitter in the 1950 - 1970 era.  A
decent receiver was a bit complex even with tube technology,
and multiple xtals in a receiver were rather exotic except
for very high end receivers. 

If you want to go vintage perhaps consider
building a superhet (or even a DC receiver) and outfitting
it with a vintage front panel look (yes same ideal as Ozark
Patrol appearance). 

A
local friend here is building his old novice station - and
did find an SX-110.  I remember some of these types of
receivers having nice 'bandspread' for the ham bands
to allow someone to use it after being licensed from SWL
only service.  But you might enjoy something with a bit
more selectivity -- our bands may be a bit more crowded than
1950-something. 

In spite
of ARRL beginner books promoting the build of a homebrew
regen, I am thinking that most folk would have taken the
expense of parts toward buying a used receiver -- even the
ARRL book admitted its rather high cost.  The age of the
regen was clearly pre-WW2. 

73 Curt

PS -
one should build a regen just for the experience!  but I
don't expect to plug one into my Magic Box

     
     

     
     



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Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Curt,

Actually there are hams who use regens coupled with a TX on the ham bands. I did a few years ago and had a lot of fun. I plan to do it some more. It's not as difficult to build a supehet with an xtal filter as it once was and so if a new ham feels up to a bit of a challenge it can be done. I built one from the ARRL Handbooks that was built and written up by Doug DeMaw. It uses four of the inexpensive color burst crystals - three in the IF filter and one for the BFO. Admittedly I had some experience by that time but mine worked the first time I powered it on. I've been lucky like that two or three times <evil grin>. Most of the time there is a bug or two. That's why we we build in stages and test each stage before moving on.

Purchasing a commercially built receiver is not a bad idea even if we do eventually build most of our own gear. One that has general coverage can be used in so many ways in addition to working on all the ham bands (MF/HF). But I would encourage anybody who has the desire to jump in and start building. So what if you let the smoke out of some parts. We *ALL* did that. That's why it's a common, inside joke :)

73,

Bill KU8H

On 07/28/2014 12:51 PM, @CurtisM [4sqrp] wrote:

Nate

I am no expert in radio history, and even 'that period' where AC-1 was used was before my time (although I did own an R5 SWL receiver that may have only been paired in advertising!). I am thinking that most beginners/hams with smaller investments would use a commercial receiver with their homebrew transmitter in the 1950 - 1970 era. A decent receiver was a bit complex even with tube technology, and multiple xtals in a receiver were rather exotic except for very high end receivers.

If you want to go vintage perhaps consider building a superhet (or even a DC receiver) and outfitting it with a vintage front panel look (yes same ideal as Ozark Patrol appearance).

A local friend here is building his old novice station - and did find an SX-110. I remember some of these types of receivers having nice 'bandspread' for the ham bands to allow someone to use it after being licensed from SWL only service. But you might enjoy something with a bit more selectivity -- our bands may be a bit more crowded than 1950-something.

In spite of ARRL beginner books promoting the build of a homebrew regen, I am thinking that most folk would have taken the expense of parts toward buying a used receiver -- even the ARRL book admitted its rather high cost. The age of the regen was clearly pre-WW2.

73 Curt

PS - one should build a regen just for the experience! but I don't expect to plug one into my Magic Box


Curt
 

Bob

extremely interesting on your first station containing a regen, and your report on QRM c. 1958 (yes I was not yet doing CW nor talking then).  Was this first receiver home constructed by yourself or another ham?  Certainly it must have been better than the 'toy regens' many of us have experienced?  I am considering a build of a WBR regen as something that might have better stability than my current model regen.  Yes I was merely thinking c. 1930 QRM not that from a later time with more hams, with less stable transmitters. 

I do know of a ham who has made many dozen QSOs with a haman rig, but realize it is xtal based.  Just curious on the craft of your original receiver. 

73 Curt WB8YYY


Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Curt,

Let me relate my own experiences with regens. Once upon a time (when I was a kid) my parents bought me a radio kit - a regen. I was thrilled. I soon discovered that regens were just little toy radios. Not very desireable. Hard to tune. Drifty. Bump it and you'll *never* find that station again - ever. The tuning cap was a compression mica trimmer - never intended for the application! No wonder. The whole radio was made of thin plastic. Wpas and bends quite easily. It didn't stand a chance. I spent a whole winter playing with it. Then I got a better "little toy radio" - another cheapie regen. The same kind of results - maybe not quite as bad. At least it had a *real* tuning cap. But the tuning rate was lightning fast and covered many MHz i it's half of a turn. Finally I built a 6SN7 regen from the ARRL Handbook. As a kid I didn't know what to do with it but it *DID* work. So I dismissed regens as useless "little toy radios".

Later an old timer offered me his RAK-7 when I told him I wanted to receive 100 kc signals so I could examine LORAN signals. I went to his house after dark to pick it up and he had it already out on his porch. I hustled it into the car and we had a beer and a nice visit. Next day I noticed the big control prominently labeled "Regeneration". I thought I'd made an awful mistake but as long as I had it I gave it a try. Regens are *not* all created equal!! Build your regen sturdy so it doesn't flex and wobble. Use reasonable quality parts. Be realistic about tuning ranges and tuning rates. Finally, ask for some help. You'll find a lot of help available on the Yahoo regenrx group. I have - and use - two regens here with two more under construction. Everybody should have two or three samples of every kind of radio. Nobody can survive with only one radio!!

73,

Bill KU8H

On 07/28/2014 03:11 PM, @CurtisM [4sqrp] wrote:

Bob

extremely interesting on your first station containing a regen, and your report on QRM c. 1958 (yes I was not yet doing CW nor talking then). Was this first receiver home constructed by yourself or another ham? Certainly it must have been better than the 'toy regens' many of us have experienced? I am considering a build of a WBR regen as something that might have better stability than my current model regen. Yes I was merely thinking c. 1930 QRM not that from a later time with more hams, with less stable transmitters.

I do know of a ham who has made many dozen QSOs with a haman rig, but realize it is xtal based. Just curious on the craft of your original receiver.

73 Curt WB8YYY

------------------------------------------------------------------------


Curt
 

Bill

thus far I haven't met a radio that I don't like some -- and I confess to having plenty of dead radio parts around.  hopefully no one else has this compulsion.  I wonder if anyone knows how to decode these colors that seem to label audio transformer cases? 

well my regen was my first electronics project - a P-box kit from Rat Shack.  I built it and turning the controls it made these dreadful sounds, so I presumed it didn't work.  I recently built a regen and it makes the same sounds - and works with some patience! 

while I have the parts (close enough including some Ge transistors that might still work) to build that regen again and the schematic is on-line.  I may cobble together an Ozark Patrol homebrew - and I am thinking I may also get it working on the AM BC band (with one of these loopstick coils I have) if I don't hear much on shortwave.  there are no unusual parts in that, well except those strange transistors - and I found a few!  and curiousity means I should socket the regen stage to see if other more common transistors also work (but they seem to have less capacitance in them ... hmmm ... a hint maybe).  anyway I need to do something with some of these radio parts .... but these old radio parts won't pull HCJB, Radio Nederland or Radio Australia out of the ether.  those of us old enough (unfortunately most of us) were blessed to live in a different wireless age than now. 

73 Curt


Robert 'RC' Conley <rc.kc5wa@...>
 

here is a web site that can give insite to regen radio and crystal radio
kc5wa
--
"The price of freedom is eternal vigilance"
Thomas Jefferson


Robert
 

Hi Curt:

This time frame was about 60 years ago so this is what I remember.

I got my start building regen receivers when I received an Allied Radio Knight Kit 6 in 1 radio lab kit for Christmas when I was in the 4th grade. One of the Kit’s circuits was an AM broadcast band regen receiver circuit that worked pretty good, as I remember. I lived in Logansport, Indiana, during my school years, and was I able to receive AM radio stations from all over the eastern half of the USA (after 12 PM when most of the local radio stations went off the air). I had two good family friends who were hams, Bob Gharis W9ZYR and John Fry W9EGV both SK. John was the Popular Electronics author of the Carl and Jerry stories and my Mom’s cousin. Both Bob and John showed me how to build many other electronic circuits on the 6 in 1 lab kit board and several were regen receiver circuits using a 6SN7 tube circuit. When I decided to go for my Novice License, I built a regen receiver using what I had learned from the 6 in 1 lab kit and a circuit from
a book at the local City Library called “The Radio Builders Handbook”. It was not the Allied Radio book but it had several regen circuits and one covered 300 KHz to 20 MHz using plugin coils. The regen circuit used three tubes and worked pretty nice. I used 80 Meters most of the time because the local AM radio station was on 1230KHz and the third harmonic was 3690 KHZ which helped me find the 80 Meter Novice band. The main problem I had using the regen circuit was the over load problem when the CW transmitter was keyed, but at the Novice code speeds, that was not that much of a problem. Since there was a QRM problem using the regen receiver, most of my contacts were in the earily evening or late night hours, 11 PM or later. I don’t remember how many contacts I made as a Novice (more than 100), but I had a nice stack of QSL cards. I sent out less than two hundred of my KN9ZLU cards because I had two groups of 100 cards made.

73,
Bob K9ZLU
www.luetzow.us
--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 7/28/14, @CurtisM [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Ozark Patrol Regen Receiver A+
To: 4sqrp@...
Date: Monday, July 28, 2014, 12:11 PM


 









Bob

extremely
interesting on your first station containing a regen, and
your report on QRM c. 1958 (yes I was not yet doing CW nor
talking then).  Was this first receiver home constructed by
yourself or another ham?  Certainly it must have been
better than the 'toy regens' many of us have
experienced?  I am considering a build of a WBR regen as
something that might have better stability than my current
model regen.  Yes I was merely thinking c. 1930 QRM not
that from a later time with more hams, with less stable
transmitters. 

I do know
of a ham who has made many dozen QSOs with a haman rig, but
realize it is xtal based.  Just curious on the craft of
your original receiver. 

73 Curt WB8YYY









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Curt
 

Bob

fascinating discussion on your first ham receiver being a homebrew regen! 

it was in my teen years that Allied Radio sold out to Radio Shack, and the end of Knight kits - I remember the fire sale but I had no building experience or mentors then, and Knight kits had become as pricey as Heath. 

cool story on the AM harmonic being a nifty calibration tone! 

I don't plan to stop building receivers anytime soon.  But work does get in the way! 

When I was a teen also I worked some at a TV shop when nearly everyone's TV still used tubes, although most of the new ones were solid state.  Also when I went to college I was in a program required co-op work assignments - the first in a plant that designed and prototyped CRTs - I am glad I quickly moved on from there into RF. 

Oh yes I treasure my novice QSL cards also!  Its a wonder I got anything to radiate from my used Heath stuff I managed to get. 

CUL nice to meet you and dialog.  I hope others have enjoyed your info as well (and probably already discussed it on this group). 

73 Curt


 

Since the post I spotted and bought a nice TS-520SE off ebay. It
arrived yesterday and looks as nice as in the pictures. Of course,
shippers can do amazing things and in this case the plug managed to work
out of the Remote VFO socket and get smashed to bits. Fortunately, the
pins required for normal operation were only bent slightly and I was
able to get the rig receiving just fine (moral, remove, wrap and note
fragile parts). Even though I had a TS-820S and TS-830S in years past,
I thought I had forgotten how to tune these guys as I couldn't get any
ALC reading. I removed power and then the top cover and reseated the
driver tube. Plugged it back in and powered it up and it tuned up just
fine on 75m even though the meter seems a bit "peaky". Closed
everything up and about an hour later I wanted to retune on 160m and
again no ALC indication when trying to peak the Drive control.

It's an old radio and I'll go through the alignment procedure one of
these days and get it going in fine fashion in time for SKN. The
receiver sure sounds good, though.

72, Nate

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us


Curt
 

Well, I'm not a real "old-timer", but built a 2-tube receiver from the QST 1956 in 1962 and a single-tube transmitter ( keyed oscillator ) in '63.  I scrounged old tvs and radios from the local dump, so the parts were free for the labor of removing them.  I used this setup for six months after getting my novice ticket, then my folks bought an HQ-170 and Eico 723 from an estate sale of an SK.  Only owned one crystal for the novice section of 40M so many times had to "wait in line" for the frequency to be clear.

73, Curt KB5JO