MP/PM


Michael McEwen
 

Sorry for reverting to old habits...MP used to mean "man portable" not PC now...I will try to remember PM...
_ _ ...   .. _ _ _

Doc K5OSA - QTH: EM04sr
ARRL  
4SQRP #801 - NAQCC #7625 - SKCC #10098
FISTS #17157 - OMISS #9886
LFSARC (Lawton/Fort Sill Amateur Radio Club)

Michael T McEwen
Lt Col, US Army, Ret

Cellular Phone:  580 919-9205
Residence:  580 529-3412


AA4GA <aa4ga@...>
 

I thought "MP" was "Military Police" - or is that obsolete?

73 de Lee
--
Lee Hiers, AA4GA

Submit your QRP DXCC totals to www.qrpdx.com!


On Tue, May 26, 2015 at 4:02 PM, Michael McEwen mcewenk5osa@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

Sorry for reverting to old habits...MP used to mean "man portable" not PC now...I will try to remember PM...
_ _ ...   .. _ _ _

Doc K5OSA - QTH: EM04sr
ARRL  
4SQRP #801 - NAQCC #7625 - SKCC #10098
FISTS #17157 - OMISS #9886
LFSARC (Lawton/Fort Sill Amateur Radio Club)

Michael T McEwen
Lt Col, US Army, Ret

Cellular Phone:  580 919-9205
Residence:  580 529-3412



Bill Cromwell
 

Lee,

You are confused - Shore Patrol is not related to Man Portable.

73,

Bill. KU8H


Sent from my Galaxy S®III


-------- Original message --------
From: "AA4GA aa4ga@... [4sqrp]" <4sqrp@...>
Date:05/26/2015 16:19 (GMT-05:00)
To: 4sqrp@...,Michael McEwen
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] MP/PM

 

I thought "MP" was "Military Police" - or is that obsolete?

73 de Lee
--
Lee Hiers, AA4GA

Submit your QRP DXCC totals to www.qrpdx.com!


On Tue, May 26, 2015 at 4:02 PM, Michael McEwen mcewenk5osa@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:
 

Sorry for reverting to old habits...MP used to mean "man portable" not PC now...I will try to remember PM...
_ _ ...   .. _ _ _

Doc K5OSA - QTH: EM04sr
ARRL  
4SQRP #801 - NAQCC #7625 - SKCC #10098
FISTS #17157 - OMISS #9886
LFSARC (Lawton/Fort Sill Amateur Radio Club)

Michael T McEwen
Lt Col, US Army, Ret

Cellular Phone:  580 919-9205
Residence:  580 529-3412



w7aqk@...
 

For us, here in the U.S., "MP" does tend to suggest the military police.  Any army vet would probably think of that first.  However, if you get a little more "worldly", the Brits refer to their representatives in Parliament as "MP's".  To further complicate things along that same line, if you use the term "PM", that refers to the Prime Minister!  It just "shows to go ya" how difficult it is for any acronym to have only a single connotation.  Yes, context helps, but all too often folks just make up their own stuff, and confusion results.  I see that a lot in posts, and also on CW, where there seems to be a propensity to try to shorten everything!

Dave W7AQK


AA4GA <aa4ga@...>
 

On Wed, May 27, 2015 at 9:45 AM, w7aqk@... [4sqrp] <4sqrp@...> wrote:  

It just "shows to go ya" how difficult it is for any acronym to have only a single connotation.


Yep, only about 675 unique combinations of two letters!

73 de Lee, AA4GA


Bill Cromwell
 

Hi,

I have used 24 hour time format (sometimes referred to as "military time) since my teens and I automatically see 16:00 when the little hand is the 4 and the big hand is on the 12 (remember hands?) with a westering sun. But other people - those who use "kindergarten time" use PM to mean after noon. Context is everything but can be inadequate.

73,

Bill  KU8H


On 05/27/2015 09:45 AM, w7aqk@... [4sqrp] wrote:
 

For us, here in the U.S., "MP" does tend to suggest the military police.  Any army vet would probably think of that first.  However, if you get a little more "worldly", the Brits refer to their representatives in Parliament as "MP's".  To further complicate things along that same line, if you use the term "PM", that refers to the Prime Minister!  It just "shows to go ya" how difficult it is for any acronym to have only a single connotation.  Yes, context helps, but all too often folks just make up their own stuff, and confusion results.  I see that a lot in posts, and also on CW, where there seems to be a propensity to try to shorten everything!

Dave W7AQK



dekle@...
 

For the English alphabet, if using the same letter twice is permissible, it is

n**r  =  676 possibilities.

if the letters must be different it is

n! / (n-r)!  =  650

For the Khmer language, 2-letter permutations with repetition allowed would be

74**2 = 5476 possibilities.

Bill
KV6Z