Resources to design transcievers


Nick-WA5BDU
 

It’s a hard question to try to answer because there’s no one-stop resource.  EMRFD as mentioned below is a good one. W7ZOI announced on the EMRFD discussion group recently that ARRL is discontinuing it. However, in discussions it seems several ham stores still have it in stock. And in further discussion, it now appears that ARRL is going to bring the book back into publication. Whether there will be a revision along with that is not yet known.
 
As others have said, building some simple stuff is the best way to learn. You’ll run into questions you didn’t anticipate and start “writing your own book”. 
 
Web blogs and websites can be good. Especially those where the author discusses how he did the design and problems he solved, rather than just posting the schematic and parts list. For example VE7BPO’s blog (now) and website (earlier).
 
Also useful to the struggling designer are PC based tools.  Especially a free spice program such as LTspice and various filter design programs.
 
73-
 
Nick, WA5BDU
 

From: Don Wilhelm donwilh@... [4sqrp]
Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2016 10:25 PM
To: 4sqrp@... ; paul@...
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] Resources to design transcievers
 
 

Paul,

See if you can find a copy of Experimental Methods In RF Design by
W7ZOI. It has a lot of design information. It is an ARRL publication,
but is currently out of print.

The ARRL Handbook also has lot of information.

Happy Experimenting.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 11/8/2016 10:09 PM, paul@... [4sqrp] wrote:
>
>
> I have been building kits from other countries and decided it was about
> time to bring my enjoyment to a new level. Instead of building kits I
> would like to try my hand at designing and building my own transceiver.
>
> I do have a basic understanding in electronics and mathematics, however
> I have not had much experience in the experimental side of our hobby.
>
>
>
> Does anyone has any favorite resources they would share?
>
>
> Thank you,
>
> Paul
>
> KG5NKW
>
>


Don Wilhelm
 

Paul,

See if you can find a copy of Experimental Methods In RF Design by W7ZOI. It has a lot of design information. It is an ARRL publication, but is currently out of print.

The ARRL Handbook also has lot of information.

Happy Experimenting.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 11/8/2016 10:09 PM, paul@... [4sqrp] wrote:


I have been building kits from other countries and decided it was about
time to bring my enjoyment to a new level. Instead of building kits I
would like to try my hand at designing and building my own transceiver.

I do have a basic understanding in electronics and mathematics, however
I have not had much experience in the experimental side of our hobby.



Does anyone has any favorite resources they would share?


Thank you,

Paul

KG5NKW


Paul Bonham
 

Phil,

I have no idea why I never thought to look a the ARRL resources.

I will look into those chips and the receiver you are suggesting.


Thank you,

Paul

KG5NKW



On 11/09/2016 10:58 AM, 'Phil' w0xiphil@... [4sqrp] wrote:
 

Hello Paul,
 
The sources are many; the question is which to look at.
A good starting place might be to check the resources that the ARRL has to offer. Take a look at their website.
 
If it is your first design, I’d suggest that you consider a basic single-conversion receiver with a crystal oscillator.
There you’d need a tuned circuit front end (from antenna), a mixer – such as the NE602 – and an audio amplifier,
perhaps the LM386.
 
You can find circuit configurations (suggestions) for using those chips by using your browser. For example, type in NE602, and you’ll get a
list of websites to look at. Most of the chip vendors include a technical specification and suggestive circuits.
 
Good luck and have fun. One other item. You can use the formulas in the ARRL handbook to figure out what L and C values you’ll need
for each tuned circuit.
 
73,
Phil, W0XI
Lawrence, KS
 
 
 
Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2016 3:09 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] Resources to design transcievers
 
 

I have been building kits from other countries and decided it was about time to bring my enjoyment to a new level. Instead of building kits I would like to try my hand at designing and building my own transceiver.

I do have a basic understanding in electronics and mathematics, however I have not had much experience in the experimental side of our hobby.


 

Does anyone has any favorite resources they would share?


Thank you,

Paul

KG5NKW




Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com




Curt
 

Paul

get to know others in the building community -- a few rapid suggestions --

EMRFD book by W7ZOI and others -- out-of-print at the moment

Soldersmoke website and podcoast

Websites of K8IQY, AA7EE, N5IB and others

Start small on your homebrew projects, and work your way up.  Also consider modular construction on smaller boards, so you can more easily make changes -- and re-use modules. 

get some basic test equipment -- some of it can be homemade. 

join EMRFD and QRP-Tech yahoo groups. 

learn from others designs -- even the one's kitted. 

learn from your own errors and difficulties -- when a project goes perfect, the opportunity to learn is less. 

don't fret what you can't purchase or find -- collect the most commonly used parts and gather/build some useful test equipment.  a signal source can be a simple xtal oscillator, a power detector can be based upon a diode detector -- or commercial log amplifier. 

CUL Curt


Phil <w0xiphil@...>
 

Hello Paul,
 
The sources are many; the question is which to look at.
A good starting place might be to check the resources that the ARRL has to offer. Take a look at their website.
 
If it is your first design, I’d suggest that you consider a basic single-conversion receiver with a crystal oscillator.
There you’d need a tuned circuit front end (from antenna), a mixer – such as the NE602 – and an audio amplifier,
perhaps the LM386.
 
You can find circuit configurations (suggestions) for using those chips by using your browser. For example, type in NE602, and you’ll get a
list of websites to look at. Most of the chip vendors include a technical specification and suggestive circuits.
 
Good luck and have fun. One other item. You can use the formulas in the ARRL handbook to figure out what L and C values you’ll need
for each tuned circuit.
 
73,
Phil, W0XI
Lawrence, KS
 
 
 

Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2016 3:09 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] Resources to design transcievers
 
 

I have been building kits from other countries and decided it was about time to bring my enjoyment to a new level. Instead of building kits I would like to try my hand at designing and building my own transceiver.

I do have a basic understanding in electronics and mathematics, however I have not had much experience in the experimental side of our hobby.


 

Does anyone has any favorite resources they would share?


Thank you,

Paul

KG5NKW




Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



gary rheuark <garyk5qnm@...>
 


Hello Paul, What band, what power level and what mode?

I just finished 25 watts CW on 475 KHZ.....Also, an inexpensive 3450 MHZ
AM design.....Progress is being made on a 22 dollar voice transceiver on
2445 MHZ....

I have done a lot of circuit boards also.....The attached photo shows a 3 board set that can be adapted for roughly 200 KHZ to 15 MHZ CW.....

The small board on the left is the CW oscillator-driver board.....All harmonics are at least 60 dBs down.....

The big board in the middle is the FET power amplifier.....Tuned and also has impedance matching to get a 50 Ohm output.....With harmonics.....

The board on the right is a low pass filter that runs cool and harmonics are down at least 60 dBs.....Runs cool at 25 watts.....

All this on a 4" by 6" piece of circuit board.....

As you can gather, I use all bands and modes of operation.....

If I can help.....Gary...K5QNM...EM36 in Missouri..... garyk5qnm@...



From: "paul@... [4sqrp]" <4sqrp@...>
To: 4sqrp@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 8, 2016 9:09 PM
Subject: [4sqrp] Resources to design transcievers



I have been building kits from other countries and decided it was about time to bring my enjoyment to a new level. Instead of building kits I would like to try my hand at designing and building my own transceiver.
I do have a basic understanding in electronics and mathematics, however I have not had much experience in the experimental side of our hobby.
 
Does anyone has any favorite resources they would share? 

Thank you,
Paul
KG5NKW





Paul Bonham
 

I have been building kits from other countries and decided it was about time to bring my enjoyment to a new level. Instead of building kits I would like to try my hand at designing and building my own transceiver.

I do have a basic understanding in electronics and mathematics, however I have not had much experience in the experimental side of our hobby.

 

Does anyone has any favorite resources they would share? 


Thank you,

Paul

KG5NKW