Topics

eznec and LTspice software


Phil Anderson
 

Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 


w2sh@...
 

Should one expect otherwise when those instructions may often derive from a Google translation of a  Chinese text?

72,

Charles, W2SH



To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh@...; wa0itp@...
CC: aldenmcduffie@...
From: aldenmcduffie@...
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 11:42:45 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 

Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 


Phil Anderson
 

Dah! Das is richtig mine Herr!
 
Unk Phil
 
 

----- Original Message -----
To: 4SQRP
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:54 AM
Subject: RE: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 

Should one expect otherwise when those instructions may often derive from a Google translation of a  Chinese text?

72,

Charles, W2SH



To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh@...; wa0itp@...
CC: aldenmcduffie@...
From: aldenmcduffie@...
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 11:42:45 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 

Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 


Tom Clifton
 

I got my start in LT Spice with the QST Column Hands-On-Radio. There were at least three articles (somehow I thought there may have been a fourth one) and all are available for members in the in-line archives. Using Spice has revolutionized my home brewing...

JAN 2010 - QST (PG. 61)
Experiment #83 -- Circuit Simulation, Build and Test
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX
Article: QST Archive [PDF]

FEB 2010 - QST (PG. 59)
Experiment #85 -- Circuit Simulation, Complex Parts
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX

MAR 2010 - QST (PG. 59)
Experiment #86 -- Viewing Waveforms in LTspice
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: 4sqrp@yahoogroups.com; n0evh@...; wa0itp@...
CC: aldenmcduffie@...
From: aldenmcduffie@...
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 11:42:45 -0500
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software




Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?

A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.

If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?

Uncle Phil


bobby rolph
 

Thanks for the info Tom. I will go to the website and print them out!
Bobby
Kb4qnr


Sent from my iPad

On Mar 26, 2013, at 2:38 PM, "Tom" <kc0vsj@...> wrote:

 

I got my start in LT Spice with the QST Column Hands-On-Radio. There were at least three articles (somehow I thought there may have been a fourth one) and all are available for members in the in-line archives. Using Spice has revolutionized my home brewing...

JAN 2010 - QST (PG. 61)
Experiment #83 -- Circuit Simulation, Build and Test
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX
Article: QST Archive [PDF]

FEB 2010 - QST (PG. 59)
Experiment #85 -- Circuit Simulation, Complex Parts
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX

MAR 2010 - QST (PG. 59)
Experiment #86 -- Viewing Waveforms in LTspice
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX

> ----------------------------------------------------------
> To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh@...; wa0itp@...
> CC: aldenmcduffie@...
> From: aldenmcduffie@...
> Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 11:42:45 -0500
> Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software
>
>
>
>
> Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
>
> A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
>
> If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
>
> Uncle Phil
>


Barney <barneyro@...>
 


Would this work for a regenerative radio?

Barney


On 3/26/2013 2:07 PM, Bobby Rolph wrote:
 
Thanks for the info Tom. I will go to the website and print them out!
Bobby
Kb4qnr


Sent from my iPad

On Mar 26, 2013, at 2:38 PM, "Tom" <kc0vsj@...> wrote:

 

I got my start in LT Spice with the QST Column Hands-On-Radio. There were at least three articles (somehow I thought there may have been a fourth one) and all are available for members in the in-line archives. Using Spice has revolutionized my home brewing...

JAN 2010 - QST (PG. 61)
Experiment #83 -- Circuit Simulation, Build and Test
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX
Article: QST Archive [PDF]

FEB 2010 - QST (PG. 59)
Experiment #85 -- Circuit Simulation, Complex Parts
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX

MAR 2010 - QST (PG. 59)
Experiment #86 -- Viewing Waveforms in LTspice
(Hands-On Radio)
Author: Silver, H. Ward, N0AX

> ----------------------------------------------------------
> To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh@...; wa0itp@...
> CC: aldenmcduffie@...
> From: aldenmcduffie@...
> Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 11:42:45 -0500
> Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software
>
>
>
>
> Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
>
> A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
>
> If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
>
> Uncle Phil
>



Phil Anderson
 


Hi Barney..............spice is a software program for simulating circuits. Yes, you can use it to simulate a regen ar audio or RF. If you wish I can send you a short article about that that I did for the last Xtal Set Society Newsletter in March. I can send that in pdf format. Let me know if you wish me to send it.
 
UNK Phil, W0XI


Would this work for a regenerative radio?

Barney



Tom Clifton
 

Short answer is 'yes' long answer is a bit more complicated. As an example, you can model a crystal oscillator, but as all the components are "perfect" there is no noise in the resistors and transistors that in the real world is what starts the oscillation. In Spice you get around this by modeling a voltage source that induces a little kick to get things started.

A regerative receiver would be an interesting model as the feedback to start the thing is carefully controlled so as not to actually run away and turn into a full blown oscillator.

Though I haven't done so- a query on the LT Spice Yahoo Group might yield some interesting answers (as might a simple Google Search)

--- In 4sqrp@yahoogroups.com, Barney <barneyro@...> wrote:


Would this work for a regenerative radio?

Barney


Eric Dallmann
 

Really, you find the EZNEC manual poorly written?  I actually think Roy did an outstanding job with it (I have no financial interest in EZNEC).  Of course, I will point out that antenna modeling is a little more involved than turning on/off some combination of four burners and an oven, so the manual may not read like that of a 1950's vintage range.  If that's what you were looking for in the EZNEC manual, I can see why you were disappointed.

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson
To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh ; WA0ITP
Cc: Phil Anderson
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:42 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 
Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 



Barney <barneyro@...>
 

     I did some searching and as you said the short answer is yes, but some of the discussion I saw  indicated that for each change in feedback voltage, the program would have to be ran again.  Not to mention knowing the motional parameters of any crystals in an oscillator. Which is unrelated to the regen I am playing with.

     I am totally unfamiliar with the lt spice program and I think I would have to practice a long  while to get it going, if at all, maybe.

Barney




On 3/26/2013 6:19 PM, Tom wrote:
 

Short answer is 'yes' long answer is a bit more complicated. As an example, you can model a crystal oscillator, but as all the components are "perfect" there is no noise in the resistors and transistors that in the real world is what starts the oscillation. In Spice you get around this by modeling a voltage source that induces a little kick to get things started.

A regerative receiver would be an interesting model as the feedback to start the thing is carefully controlled so as not to actually run away and turn into a full blown oscillator.

Though I haven't done so- a query on the LT Spice Yahoo Group might yield some interesting answers (as might a simple Google Search)

--- In 4sqrp@..., Barney wrote:
>
>
> Would this work for a regenerative radio?
>
> Barney
>
>



Phil Anderson
 


Hi Eric..............my point was that manuals in general could be improved. I've talked to Roy in person at a few hamfests; nice guy! Outstanding program; paid for the pro version; and like it a lot.
 
What I'd still like is an executive summary at the beginning of every manual and/or sectoin that outlines the big picture  ---- probably not going to get it. A narrative ahead of each "click here than then click there" would be nice.
 
Unk Phil.
 
 

---- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:35 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

Really, you find the EZNEC manual poorly written?  I actually think Roy did an outstanding job with it (I have no financial interest in EZNEC).  Of course, I will point out that antenna modeling is a little more involved than turning on/off some combination of four burners and an oven, so the manual may not read like that of a 1950's vintage range.  If that's what you were looking for in the EZNEC manual, I can see why you were disappointed.

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson
To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh ; WA0ITP
Cc: Phil Anderson
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:42 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 
Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 



Rick Bennett
 

I second that.  The EZNEC manual is one of the best out there.  (My iPhone is one of the worst I have ever seen, I wouldn't even put them in the same category).  

I think the challenge with antenna modeling is that it is complex.  It takes time to learn how to get good results from the software.  I have found Roy's manual to be helpful for almost every odd situation I have messed with and that is above and beyond most manuals.  But antenna modeling takes time to learn and you just have to spend time, accept some trial and error with it and learn some antenna theory to understand what you are getting.

I have not tried LTspice yet, but I expect that the issues are similar.  

While these things may not quite be "rocket science", they are not far from it either.

de KC0PET, Rick


 

Really, you find the EZNEC manual poorly written?  I actually think Roy did an outstanding job with it (I have no financial interest in EZNEC).  Of course, I will point out that antenna modeling is a little more involved than turning on/off some combination of four burners and an oven, so the manual may not read like that of a 1950's vintage range.  If that's what you were looking for in the EZNEC manual, I can see why you were disappointed.

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson
To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh ; WA0ITP
Cc: Phil Anderson
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:42 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 
Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 



Eric Dallmann
 

Phil,

I agree on current manuals in general; they're mostly awful.  I just thought that the EZNEC manual was an odd choice to pick on when there are so many truly bad ones to choose from.  Your suggestion would probably improve the EZNEC manual, but it's plenty usable as-is.

I also agree on your assessment of Roy.  I'm sure I've tried his patience more than once via both e-mail and phone, but he's never showed it (running the pro version here too).

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson
To: Eric Dallmann ; 4sqrp@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 10:09 AM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software


Hi Eric..............my point was that manuals in general could be improved. I've talked to Roy in person at a few hamfests; nice guy! Outstanding program; paid for the pro version; and like it a lot.
 
What I'd still like is an executive summary at the beginning of every manual and/or sectoin that outlines the big picture  ---- probably not going to get it. A narrative ahead of each "click here than then click there" would be nice.
 
Unk Phil.
 
 
---- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:35 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

Really, you find the EZNEC manual poorly written?  I actually think Roy did an outstanding job with it (I have no financial interest in EZNEC).  Of course, I will point out that antenna modeling is a little more involved than turning on/off some combination of four burners and an oven, so the manual may not read like that of a 1950's vintage range.  If that's what you were looking for in the EZNEC manual, I can see why you were disappointed.

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson
To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh ; WA0ITP
Cc: Phil Anderson
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:42 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 
Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 





Johnny AC0BQ
 

Ge Guys:
I have been following the thread, kinda.
I have to ask the question.
Where do you get the ENZEC?
I would suppose from the web site? How much is it after the trial period?
Thanks
Johnny AC0BQ

On Wed, Mar 27, 2013 at 7:30 PM, k9vic <ericdallmann@...> wrote:
 

Phil,

I agree on current manuals in general; they're mostly awful.  I just thought that the EZNEC manual was an odd choice to pick on when there are so many truly bad ones to choose from.  Your suggestion would probably improve the EZNEC manual, but it's plenty usable as-is.

I also agree on your assessment of Roy.  I'm sure I've tried his patience more than once via both e-mail and phone, but he's never showed it (running the pro version here too).

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...>
To: Eric Dallmann <K9VIC@...>; 4sqrp@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 10:09 AM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

Hi Eric..............my point was that manuals in general could be improved. I've talked to Roy in person at a few hamfests; nice guy! Outstanding program; paid for the pro version; and like it a lot.
 
What I'd still like is an executive summary at the beginning of every manual and/or sectoin that outlines the big picture  ---- probably not going to get it. A narrative ahead of each "click here than then click there" would be nice.
 
Unk Phil.
 
 
---- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:35 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

Really, you find the EZNEC manual poorly written?  I actually think Roy did an outstanding job with it (I have no financial interest in EZNEC).  Of course, I will point out that antenna modeling is a little more involved than turning on/off some combination of four burners and an oven, so the manual may not read like that of a 1950's vintage range.  If that's what you were looking for in the EZNEC manual, I can see why you were disappointed.

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...>
To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh <n0evh@...>; WA0ITP <wa0itp@...>
Cc: Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...>
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:42 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 
Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil 
 
 






Eric Dallmann
 

EZNEC is available at: http://eznec.com/

The trial period for the demo is forever, but you can only use 20 segments (which severely limits what antennas you can model accurately).  However, it does let you see (and use) all the program's features.  A full version of EZNEC (there are several levels you can purchase) may not be the cheapest antenna modeling program out there, but often you get what you pay for.

Eric/K9VIC


From: Johnny Matlock
To: 4sqrp@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 7:37 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 
Ge Guys:
I have been following the thread, kinda.
I have to ask the question.
Where do you get the ENZEC?
I would suppose from the web site? How much is it after the trial period?
Thanks
Johnny AC0BQ

On Wed, Mar 27, 2013 at 7:30 PM, k9vic <ericdallmann@...> wrote:
 
Phil,

I agree on current manuals in general; they're mostly awful.  I just thought that the EZNEC manual was an odd choice to pick on when there are so many truly bad ones to choose from.  Your suggestion would probably improve the EZNEC manual, but it's plenty usable as-is.

I also agree on your assessment of Roy.  I'm sure I've tried his patience more than once via both e-mail and phone, but he's never showed it (running the pro version here too).

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...>
To: Eric Dallmann <K9VIC@...>; 4sqrp@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 10:09 AM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

Hi Eric..............my point was that manuals in general could be improved. I've talked to Roy in person at a few hamfests; nice guy! Outstanding program; paid for the pro version; and like it a lot.
 
What I'd still like is an executive summary at the beginning of every manual and/or sectoin that outlines the big picture  ---- probably not going to get it. A narrative ahead of each "click here than then click there" would be nice.
 
Unk Phil.
 
 
---- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:35 PM
Subject: Re: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

Really, you find the EZNEC manual poorly written?  I actually think Roy did an outstanding job with it (I have no financial interest in EZNEC).  Of course, I will point out that antenna modeling is a little more involved than turning on/off some combination of four burners and an oven, so the manual may not read like that of a 1950's vintage range.  If that's what you were looking for in the EZNEC manual, I can see why you were disappointed.

Eric/K9VIC


From: Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...>
To: 4sqrp@...; n0evh <n0evh@...>; WA0ITP <wa0itp@...>
Cc: Phil Anderson <aldenmcduffie@...>
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:42 AM
Subject: [4sqrp] eznec and LTspice software

 
Good idea John on downloading EZNEC. It does take a bit of time to get used to the manual/instructions - and that would be true of any manuals "written" today. Manuals in general are a problem. Take my iPhone as an example, really crappy documentation. About 6 or 8 years ago I was visiting my daughter in St Louis and we were cleaning her kitchen. We really cleaned the stove top gas range only to discover the manual for it in the drawer, written in about 1950. I found that manual to be excellent, very clear on how to use it and what burner went with what knob, etc. Not so of today's ranges. When did we stop teaching writing to kids, todays designers? Maybe about 1980?
 
A second via John, consider downloading LTspice. You can download a free copy from linear technology's website. It is really super for simulating circuit. It's easy, for example, to draw the schematic for a audio phase-shift oscillator and then hit the simulation button; you can select to see the waveform generated or the frequency response of the unit. Then you can change values and play what if. Again....the manual takes some time to get used to.
 
If anyone is interested, we could get a "go-to-meeting" link set up on the WEB and I'd be happy to outline how to use the program, generating and simulating several simple circuits. Let's discuss that at Ozcon?
 
Uncle Phil