Topics

Of interest, a "paraset" connection

Paul Goemans
 

Hello all,
  I just discovered a book which might be of interest. It is the story of a Baltimore woman, Virginia Hall. She became an incredibly successful spy in WW2 occupied France, first for the British SOE, and later for the US OSS. I have not read the book but saw an illustration from the book of her operating a “paraset” type spy radio! Has anyone read the book?
 
a-woman-of-no-importance-blog
 
virginia-hall-blog-post-web
 
 
Paul Goemans WA9PWP
Stoughton, WI

Dave Benson
 

Thanks, Paul-

Very interesting!

73- Dave, K1SWL


On Mon, Jun 29, 2020 at 8:13 AM Paul Goemans <wa9pwp@...> wrote:
Hello all,
  I just discovered a book which might be of interest. It is the story of a Baltimore woman, Virginia Hall. She became an incredibly successful spy in WW2 occupied France, first for the British SOE, and later for the US OSS. I have not read the book but saw an illustration from the book of her operating a “paraset” type spy radio! Has anyone read the book?
 
a-woman-of-no-importance-blog
 
virginia-hall-blog-post-web
 
 
Paul Goemans WA9PWP
Stoughton, WI

Paul Goemans
 

If I mislead anyone, I do not own the book. I just heard of it on Facebook.
 
Paul Goemans WA9PWP
Stoughton, WI
 

From: Dave Benson
Sent: Monday, June 29, 2020 7:25 AM
To: main@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] Of interest, a "paraset" connection
 
Thanks, Paul-
 
Very interesting!
 
73- Dave, K1SWL
 
On Mon, Jun 29, 2020 at 8:13 AM Paul Goemans <wa9pwp@...> wrote:
Hello all,
  I just discovered a book which might be of interest. It is the story of a Baltimore woman, Virginia Hall. She became an incredibly successful spy in WW2 occupied France, first for the British SOE, and later for the US OSS. I have not read the book but saw an illustration from the book of her operating a “paraset” type spy radio! Has anyone read the book?
 
a-woman-of-no-importance-blog
 
virginia-hall-blog-post-web
 
 
Paul Goemans WA9PWP
Stoughton, WI
_._,_._,_

 

w0rw
 

Thanks Paul,
i misunderstood.
i have ordered it and will put it into the W0RW Lending Library.
Paul  w0rw

Thomas Martin
 

I have read the book as with all of them about the SOE and OSS the radio networks were a key part operators were hard to come by  as their lives were short lived 


On Monday, June 29, 2020, w0rw <w0rw1@...> wrote:
Thanks Paul,
i misunderstood.
i have ordered it and will put it into the W0RW Lending Library.
Paul  w0rw

keith ford
 

She was missing one leg also. 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Monday, June 29, 2020, 07:32, Paul Goemans <wa9pwp@...> wrote:

If I mislead anyone, I do not own the book. I just heard of it on Facebook.
 
Paul Goemans WA9PWP
Stoughton, WI
 
Sent: Monday, June 29, 2020 7:25 AM
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] Of interest, a "paraset" connection
 
Thanks, Paul-
 
Very interesting!
 
73- Dave, K1SWL
 
On Mon, Jun 29, 2020 at 8:13 AM Paul Goemans <wa9pwp@...> wrote:
Hello all,
  I just discovered a book which might be of interest. It is the story of a Baltimore woman, Virginia Hall. She became an incredibly successful spy in WW2 occupied France, first for the British SOE, and later for the US OSS. I have not read the book but saw an illustration from the book of her operating a “paraset” type spy radio! Has anyone read the book?
 
a-woman-of-no-importance-blog
 
virginia-hall-blog-post-web
 
 
Paul Goemans WA9PWP
Stoughton, WI

WA4EFS
 

I have also read the book. It is very good.

 

From: main@4SQRP.groups.io [mailto:main@4SQRP.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Martin
Sent: Monday, June 29, 2020 8:47 AM
To: main@4sqrp.groups.io
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] Of interest, a "paraset" connection

 

I have read the book as with all of them about the SOE and OSS the radio networks were a key part operators were hard to come by  as their lives were short lived 

On Monday, June 29, 2020, w0rw <w0rw1@...> wrote:

Thanks Paul,

i misunderstood.

i have ordered it and will put it into the W0RW Lending Library.

Paul  w0rw

Jim Upson
 

I’ve read another similar book: “The Wolves at the Door”.....I liked the story....but it wasn’t the best written book in the world.....

https://www.amazon.com/Wolves-Door-Americas-Greatest-Female/dp/159921072X


also....a movie was made: “Liberté: A Call to Spy“

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt7698468/

73, Jim / AC3B 

Frank Perkins
 

I've read several books about those brave radio operators 
Men operators started to be arrested because most men were expected to be serving in the war, and those left behind became suspecious. So the spy operations started recruiting women, who went about their routine daily lives ignored by the German occupation staff.
One book I liked was "The lost girls of Paris" by Pam Jenoff.
Frank N6CES


On Tue, Jun 30, 2020, 9:06 AM Jim Upson <jim72upson@...> wrote:

I’ve read another similar book: “The Wolves at the Door”.....I liked the story....but it wasn’t the best written book in the world.....

https://www.amazon.com/Wolves-Door-Americas-Greatest-Female/dp/159921072X


also....a movie was made: “Liberté: A Call to Spy“

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt7698468/

73, Jim / AC3B 

Tom Sevart
 

On 6/30/2020 18:56, Frank Perkins wrote:
I've read several books about those brave radio operators
Men operators started to be arrested because most men were expected to be serving in the war, and those left behind became suspecious. So the spy operations started recruiting women, who went about their routine daily lives ignored by the German occupation staff.
One book I liked was "The lost girls of Paris" by Pam Jenoff.
Frank N6CES
Part of the problem also was that the allies were using direct conversion receivers in their sets. For those who aren't aware, DC receivers tend to emit a heterodyne right on the frequency they're operating on. So when the German DF units found the general location of the transmitted signal, if they got close enough they'd pick up the het from the receiver right on the same frequency. Get close enough to the receiver and the het is almost as strong as the transmitted signal. So when you're trying to stay hidden, it's really bad when your receiver puts out a strong signal on the freq you're operating on.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS

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Frank Perkins
 

Yes, it seemed that those stationed at "listening posts" were the most vulnerable.
Since batteries were a scarce commodity, non-listening post stations completely shut down and hid the radio after their scheduled op-time. This, along with a secret, but appearingly random schedule, made detection more difficult.
When small aircraft made their nite pickup and drops of spies, batteries and first-aid supplies were usual cargo to the underground resistance groups.
Fantastic reading.
Frank N6CES



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020, 6:14 PM Tom Sevart <tmsevart@...> wrote:
On 6/30/2020 18:56, Frank Perkins wrote:
> I've read several books about those brave radio operators
> Men operators started to be arrested because most men were expected to
> be serving in the war, and those left behind became suspecious. So the
> spy operations started recruiting women, who went about their routine
> daily lives ignored by the German occupation staff.
> One book I liked was "The lost girls of Paris" by Pam Jenoff.
> Frank N6CES
>

Part of the problem also was that the allies were using direct
conversion receivers in their sets.  For those who aren't aware, DC
receivers tend to emit a heterodyne right on the frequency they're
operating on.  So when the German DF units found the general location of
the transmitted signal, if they got close enough they'd pick up the het
from the receiver right on the same frequency.  Get close enough to the
receiver and the het is almost as strong as the transmitted signal.  So
when you're trying to stay hidden, it's really bad when your receiver
puts out a strong signal on the freq you're operating on.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus




w2sh@...
 

The ability to operate a clandestine radio transmitter from batteries was an advantage because of the portability afforded.  But  more important was the removal of the equipment from mains power. 

Here's why.

The occupying Germans had mobile receiving units in automobiles with loop antennas.  But their task was made  easier when the Germans shut down various geographic sectors of commercially supplied electric power while the rogue transmitter was operating. Transmissions using commercial power immediately ceased and the location of the rogue transmitter became quickly localized.

72,

Charles, W2SH

P.S.  I am a former French national and my dad was in the resistance movement, never transmitting, but listening to coded messages contained in the daily French language broadcasts by the BBC from London.  With these he coordinated his sabotage efforts, spotting German coastal gun positions along the south-western coast of France while sailing a  "fishing" boat. 


From: main@4SQRP.groups.io <main@4SQRP.groups.io> on behalf of Frank Perkins <N6CES.r@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 0:09
To: main@4sqrp.groups.io <main@4sqrp.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [4SQRP] Of interest, a "paraset" connection
 
Yes, it seemed that those stationed at "listening posts" were the most vulnerable.
Since batteries were a scarce commodity, non-listening post stations completely shut down and hid the radio after their scheduled op-time. This, along with a secret, but appearingly random schedule, made detection more difficult.
When small aircraft made their nite pickup and drops of spies, batteries and first-aid supplies were usual cargo to the underground resistance groups.
Fantastic reading.
Frank N6CES



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020, 6:14 PM Tom Sevart <tmsevart@...> wrote:
On 6/30/2020 18:56, Frank Perkins wrote:
> I've read several books about those brave radio operators
> Men operators started to be arrested because most men were expected to
> be serving in the war, and those left behind became suspecious. So the
> spy operations started recruiting women, who went about their routine
> daily lives ignored by the German occupation staff.
> One book I liked was "The lost girls of Paris" by Pam Jenoff.
> Frank N6CES
>

Part of the problem also was that the allies were using direct
conversion receivers in their sets.  For those who aren't aware, DC
receivers tend to emit a heterodyne right on the frequency they're
operating on.  So when the German DF units found the general location of
the transmitted signal, if they got close enough they'd pick up the het
from the receiver right on the same frequency.  Get close enough to the
receiver and the het is almost as strong as the transmitted signal.  So
when you're trying to stay hidden, it's really bad when your receiver
puts out a strong signal on the freq you're operating on.

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus





--
Charles Moizeau, W2SH

griffithsesq.robert
 

I believe that a German Spy in the U.S. in WW2 was caught when a Radio Amateur working for either a Utility Company or the FCC recognized the buzzing of a faulty Electric Meter to be Morse Code. Radio Amateurs in the U.S. had been prohibited from being on the air.

Following up on Charles W2SH’s comment about messages to the French Resistance from the BBC:

“This is London calling. Some messages for our friends.
The Dice are on the Carpet.
The Dice are on the Carpet.
It is Hot in the Suez.
It is Hot in the Suez.”
Evening, London, 6/5/44
Nous nous Souvenons.
73.
Griff NE3I

Robert Alan Griffiths

Peter Dehman
 


On Thu, Jul 2, 2020 at 4:32 PM griffithsesq.robert via groups.io <signalnaut=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I believe that a German Spy in the U.S. in WW2 was caught when a Radio Amateur working for either a Utility Company or the FCC recognized the buzzing of a faulty Electric Meter to be Morse Code. Radio Amateurs in the U.S. had been prohibited from being on the air.

Following up on Charles W2SH’s comment about messages to the French Resistance from the BBC:

“This is London calling. Some messages for our friends.
The Dice are on the Carpet.
The Dice are on the Carpet.
It is Hot in the Suez.
It is Hot in the Suez.”
Evening, London, 6/5/44
Nous nous Souvenons.
73.
Griff NE3I

Robert Alan Griffiths



Tom Sevart
 

On 7/2/2020 15:32, griffithsesq.robert via groups.io wrote:

Following up on Charles W2SH’s comment about messages to the French Resistance from the BBC:
“This is London calling. Some messages for our friends.
The Dice are on the Carpet.
The Dice are on the Carpet.
It is Hot in the Suez.
It is Hot in the Suez.”
Evening, London, 6/5/44
Nous nous Souvenons.
If you remember the movie "The Longest Day"

"Jean has a long mustache."

--
Tom Sevart N2UHC
St. Paul, KS

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

w0rw
 

i have "A Woman of No Importance" in my lending library.  
Go to: https://www.librarycat.org/lib/W0RW
   If you have never requested books before then you have to send me an email so I can approve your name and address, (Send email to  w0rw1@...).
   After you get approved you can double click on a book from the scrolling banner. 
   If you want that book, and it shows as 'Available', Click "Check Out" button.
The pasword is 'Paraset'.
Same Rules:

It is all free but there are rules to keep everything moving.

Only 2 books at a time maybe ordered out at a time.

Return books after 1 month.  You only pay return postage.

Return books via USPS “Media Rate”. 

I can only ship to USA addresses.

Use the 'TinyCat' Web page to request books. 

i don't need to know when you received the book(s) or when you sent them off.

 

Procedure: I send the books to you, You read and return the book(s) to me or send them on to next person as advised on the circulation list.

 
Paul  Signorelli   w0rw

905 Zodiac Dr.

Colorado Springs, CO  80905

n5ib_2
 

Posted also to the Bayou Jumper Group:

Another book to add to your fireside reading list:
Scholars of Mayhem, by Daniel Guiet and Timothy Smith
ISBN 9780735225206 (hardcover) or 9780735225213 (ebook)

It's the story of the author's father, Lt. Jean Claude Guiet, an American airborne officer who was the wireless operator for the
"Salesman II" SOE circuit in France in the time of the Normandy invasion.

N5IB

David Wilcox
 

Just ordered it.

Dave K8WPE (a book addict hooked by my mother a long time ago, especially WWII spy books)

David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad

On Jul 8, 2020, at 4:58 PM, n5ib_2 <n5ib@...> wrote:

Posted also to the Bayou Jumper Group:

Another book to add to your fireside reading list:
Scholars of Mayhem, by Daniel Guiet and Timothy Smith
ISBN 9780735225206 (hardcover) or 9780735225213 (ebook)

It's the story of the author's father, Lt. Jean Claude Guiet, an American airborne officer who was the wireless operator for the
"Salesman II" SOE circuit in France in the time of the Normandy invasion.

N5IB


Peter Dehman
 

GM,

Just ordered it from Amazon.
TNX fer the heads up!!

de WA1ISA



On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 5:32 AM David Wilcox via groups.io <Djwilcox01=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Just ordered it.

Dave K8WPE (a book addict hooked by my mother a long time ago, especially WWII spy books)

David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad

> On Jul 8, 2020, at 4:58 PM, n5ib_2 <n5ib@...> wrote:
>
> Posted also to the Bayou Jumper Group:
>
> Another book to add to your fireside reading list:
> Scholars of Mayhem, by Daniel Guiet and Timothy Smith
> ISBN 9780735225206 (hardcover) or 9780735225213 (ebook)
>
> It's the story of the author's father, Lt. Jean Claude Guiet, an American airborne officer who was the wireless operator for the
> "Salesman II"  SOE circuit in France in the time of the Normandy invasion.
>
> N5IB
>
>
>